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Posts by xrox

I just wrote this explanation in another thread Each displayed frame in a plasma display is "compiled" or "integrated" from a series of short light pulses. 10-14 pulses create one solid frame that we see. However, these individual pulses have brightness weights ranging from very dim to very bright and they are ordered from darkest to brightest or vice versa. This creates a pattern of dark-light-dark-light-dark-light that we see as 60Hz flicker. The light portion is...
Nope. Plasma TV flicker is constant and equal to the refresh rate. It is somewhat different than CRT in that it has a longer duty cycle and in most cases is not a scan (not all), but the frequency is identical to CRT and OLED.
From the literature I can say that OLED addressing can be very complex with multiplex addressing, line-by-line, groups of lines, address-then-strobe.....etc. However, IIRC different addressing schemes requires different circuitry and possibly different TFT arrangements and designs.Note: Plasma displays also update the picture line by line from top to bottom. However, most are address-then-display so the panel is updated with data and then strobbed when the update is...
Not trying to confuse anyone but it would be more correct to say that Plasma TVs operate this way in order to create grayscale and not due to some limitation on exciting plasma. It can most definitely stay on if designed that way but would have no ability to create grayscale.
I've tried explaining this for a good 10 years here without success LOL. Maybe I need to work on my explanation. Here goes -- Plasma TVs do not have better motion resolution due to response time, pixel persistence, PWM, or 600Hz whatever!!!!!!!!They have better motion resolution due to sequential subfield weighting which creates 1 dark period and 1 light period per frame (i.e. 60Hz flicker).Each displayed frame in a plasma display is "compiled" or "integrated" from a...
You see three types of motion blur in displays.1 - Blur in the signal (e.g. - blur created by the camera recording the video....etc)- This blur is dominent according to a scientific paper I have.2 - Blur created by the display (e.g. - long phosphor decay, slow pixel transitions...etc)3 - Blur created by your eye smoothly tracking sequential stationary frames on a screen. This blur largely depends on how long each frame is displayed and your eyes degree of persistence.
PDP generates gray levels via spatial and temporal dithering (ie - error diffusion/halftoning....etc). This can be argued to be a source of percieved sharpness reduction in PDP vs that of LCD.
The Kuro models have several (2 or 3 IIRC) set up black levels that are brighter than MLL and are used on blank inputs, after the entire screen has been black too long and shuts off, and when first turning on the panel.MLL is only reached when several conditions are met including having an active input.AFAIK The reason for this is to activate the exoelectron process that enables stable operation with MLL.
Very well may be the case. My response was not to argue the cause of the red tint but to point out that the driving voltages and physical panel affect each other. Your post suggested they did not.Not necessarily. The material thickness does vary across the panel (on purpose in some cases). Combine that with some very tight voltage thresholds and you can get unwanted non-uniformities. The KURO models had an ovel shape to the black level due to this phenomenon IIRC (see...
Both the physical structure and the electrical properties of the cells change with usage.In other words, the voltages needed to discharge the cells properly shift with usage time and this shift is caused by the physical changes within the cell.IIRC here are a few physical changes that cause electrical shifts within a cell.MgO is sputtered off of the top electrode and onto the walls, adjacent cells, and phosphors.MgO surface morphology and impurity concentration change with...
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