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Posts by John Schuermann

I just spent the last few days scouring the state of Colorado for any remaining Panasonic plasmas. Finally found one right here in Colorado Springs at the local Best Buy - a display model with minimal hours. After I bought it, I found out that Paul's TV right here in Colorado Springs also has a few floor models left (a couple of VTs and a ZT IIRC). Just posting this in case anyone else here in Colorado is frantically searching for a set before they disappear...
There will always be some pincushion with an anamorphic lens; the shorter the throw the more pincushion there will be. Panamorph recommends a throw ratio of at least 3X the screen height for a horizontal expansion lens (one that makes the image 33% wider). So, with a 44" tall screen your minimum throw distance should be 11 ft. You are at a slightly greater throw distance than the minimum, which means you will have some pincushion but under the amount most people would...
The idea behind an anamorphic lens is actually to preserve OAR.Hopefully you find the webcast interesting.
Time for a little flagrant self-promotion. DavidHir, it might be worth an hour of your time to watch the webcast I did with Scott Wilkinson right here on this forum: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1515263/aspect-ratios-and-anamorphic-lenses-with-john-schuermann All of this stuff is talked about - and illustrated - during our talk. If your projector is zoomed out to the maximum in order to get the 108.5" wide image, yes, if you are using the zoom method that is what you are...
As Stanger points out, it was released early on and there was no consensus yet on what 4K would be.The Sony has various modes that let you use all or just the 16:9 portion of the chips, even for anamorphic.BTW, I can personally confirm that some of the major studios are using the VW1000 in their labs (I saw it in action).
Blu-ray did not include anamorphic as part of the format since there was no path to 21:9 / 2.40:1 home displays on the horizon when the standard was formalized. We who have anamorphic lenses would have been the only ones able to take advantage of it, and unfortunately, we are only a small minority of consumers. However, 21:9 displays ARE currently being marketed (or soon will be) and this may change.That said, an anamorphically enhanced 1080P Blu-ray will have visible...
Most explanations of 16:9 have dealt with the "equal pain" theory (which I planned to bring up on the show, but did not have the opportunity). Up until the advent of 16:9, most material likely to be viewed was either 4:3 or 2.40:1. Use of 16:9 (1.78.1) splits the difference, with both 4:3 and 2.40:1 requiring roughly the same amount of "black bar space" to be displayed properly. Therefore, both formats suffer equal compromises - or equal pain, depending on how you look...
No, it will work with any UltraWide aspect ratio, with the *maximum* potential increase of resolution being 33% (which gets you to 2.37:1, as pointed out). So, a 2.40:1 movie will still get a 33% increase of resolution but part of that resolution will be wasted on very slight black bars remaining even after we apply the process (an end result might be an effective increase in vertical resolution of 32%). A movie like "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World" has an aspect ratio of...
Not all that familiar with HDMI protocols, so perhaps someone else here can answer that in more depth.Shawn's technology works equally well with UHD as it does with HD. We have had interest on both sides of the equation. Things are moving fast in the industry with many different proposals as to how things "should" go. What we are focusing on is creating technologies that are agnostic to specific formats so the benefits are pretty much universal. The only real issue...
That's correct - it's an actual D-Cinema configuration.
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