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Posts by John Schuermann

The color calibration we are referring to is a one time deal at initial setup. Bulb hours etc. do not factor in.
Good answers here, particularly Mark's. And yes, LoudDad, the video processor takes the 810 or so lines and upscales it to 1080. Panamorph has developed a technology to encode extra resolution behind the black bars of letterboxed movies to get to a resolution of 1920 x 1080 as well. We will be talking about this technology day after tomorrow on Scott Wilkinson's AVS show. The first part of the series - on anamorphic lenses and constant height projection - is...
FYI I saw those at CES and they were impressive. Both LG and Samsung told me that they are not necessarily going into production on those models - they were simply judging the response they were getting at the show. Time will tell what feedback they got, and whether or not these models will ever make it to a retailer near you.
Personally, I would stick with the X90 and wait for a true 4K (or High Dynamic Range) projector to hit a price point you are comfortable with. IMO, the PQ improvement of going from the X90 to the X900 would not be all that substantial. There are literally zero plans for 21:9 panels to hit projectors, at least for the foreseeable future. DPI and Projection Design had one a few years ago (at $25,000 or more, IIRC) and they ended up sitting on a lot of inventory. There is...
Jeahrens above is correct when he states you will need a projector with lens shift and a good zoom range. When zooming a projector that does not have lens memory, it's usually not as easy as simply zooming the image in to make it larger. You also need to re-center the image as zooming usually results in an image that also shifts up or down. This is where lens shift is a necessity.You might also consider a projector with excellent black levels (like JVC or Sony) so that...
RE: opening apertures and reducing contrast. Stanger posted this in another thread, and I think it addresses the subject far more clearly and cogently that I can. I hope he doesn't mind me re-posting it here: Zoom lenses on (almost all) projectors are not constant aperture, as you open the aperture, less light is blocked (or more light is allowed to pass). This includes both "real" light and "waste" light. The less waste light you block the lower the contrast. This is...
I would agree with your statement regarding sub-pixel shift if you said "has the potential to cause loss of resolution." I have played with Sony, Epson and JVC projectors and have adjusted the zones for pixel alignment with literally zero visible artifacts (at least for current models). It is a scaling operation as you point out, so like any scaling operation, has the potential to create artifacts. To verify that the process was clean, I used the desktop output from my...
This screen info is helpful, since obviously the screen is a huge part of the equation. My only real contribution here is to stress how important it is to match the screen material to the room and the projector. If you want a huge screen, you need a bright projector or a high gain material (the latter entailing compromises). If you want black pillarbox bars to "disappear" without masking, you need a grey or black screen (or a white screen with at least a little gain,...
My admittedly prejudiced answer: yes. I have a JVC projector (an HD950) and use an automated Panamorph DC1 lens. Before I became a consultant for Panamorph I already was using their products. That said, I don't think the zoom method in your room is a bad idea. You are already compensating for some of the compromises by having an almost perfect, blacked out room. Your screen is also small enough that it does not scream out for more light output from the...
A couple of things: The use of keystoning to correct for image geometry issues is scarily prevalent. There was a VERY high end A/V company here in Colorado Springs who used to slam every projector up against the ceiling and then keystone the hell out of it. It was literally SOP. The guy who ran the company used to teach classes at CEDIA University on home theater design. Scary! They are out of business now so I can finally break my silence on this. FYI you can get a...
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