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Posts by aBlueSky

Actually, if you are going to argue that studio monitors don't work for consumer applications, then you are going to have to provide something more than your "hunch" as evidence. Certainly, in overly broad terms, consumer speakers may not always be the best choice for professional applications***, because of some of the items listed in a previous post, but that doesn't mean that the inverse is true. From my own personal experience at Lucasfilm THX, M&K, Audio Design Labs...
I think you are confusing several different applications; when people refer to studio monitors, they are typically referring to monitoring systems for smaller recording studios, such as near-field and mid-field monitors and rooms under about 5k cubic feet. When you mention the x-curve, that is only for large rooms / movie theaters, cinema applications and dubbing stages. However, it is important to note, that when you close-mic and measure a cinema speaker system, it...
Just to be clear, the picture you are showing is of the scoring stage at Skywalker Sound (music recording) and there are a number of monitoring systems that are available to clients of the scoring stage (M&K, Blue Sky, Wilson Audio, B&W, Tannoy, Meyer, ATC, Genelec and Yamaha). There is also a custom Allen Sides / Ocean Way monitoring system built-in the front wall, behind the acoustically transparent material. In the rooms dedicated to post production audio editing and...
Just because it wasn't the designers primary design goal, doesn't mean that they cannot perform well in that application. And from a purely technical / performance criteria, there is no reason why a consumer can't use professional monitors in their home audio systems. As I mentioned we have many consumer users, but so do Genelec, Mackie and others. For whatever reason, this does seem to be more popular outside the US, especially in the UK and Denmark, at least for Blue...
I believe I did address the the general question, when I mentioned the issues about design goals, cosmetics and the fact that they are typically self powered (which is a performance benefit, but can add to the complications at installation, especially for the surround speakers). However, the laws of physics don't change when you call a speaker 'professional'. A speaker with flat on axis response, smooth on and off axis response, and good overall power response, is well...
If the consumer wants speakers that are generally a little more accurate (due to the design goals and needs of the professional customer, they tend to be less forgiving), doesn't mind the more industrial or utilitarian cosmetics, and can deal with self powered monitors (most pro near fields and mid-field monitors are bi-amplified or tri-amplified, etc), then there is no reason why they can't be used in a home. And, we have many consumers and professionals, that are very...
Correct.
Contact one of their cinema sales people: http://www.qscaudio.com/support/sales_contact/sales.htm Francois or Danny should be able to help you. Cheers!
Thank you for the link, I will check it out. With regard to the surrounds; the surround height is 2' above seated ear height (please note that seated ear height is lower than the top of the backrest of the couch) and as you move to the left or right side of the couch, you end up being pretty far off axis from the speaker that is nearest to you and more on axis with the surround speaker that is opposite of you. This effect is accentuated by how the speakers are rotated and...
With regard to the back of the TV: I used some simple Auralex Foam and Velcro. It actually is reasonably effective. With regard to the ceiling: The ceiling is angled and doesn't seem to be a huge issue in the main seating area, but I am still looking at building an acoustic 'cloud' panel at some point. Both the front and back wall have 4" GIK panels on them, so that helps. We have also ordered an area rug, which should help tame the room a little more, but in general it...
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