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Posts by djearl81

I'm currently using xbmc. However the video playback is a secondary function of this pc. I don't absolutely have to have the bluray playback stutter free at this point.It's one of those things that bugs me a little just because I know it could be better....but I don't really need it. I run an OEM copy of XP that came on the e510 out of the box. I wouldn't be able to transfer the license to a new MB. I just priced out the parts I need to upgrade to an AMD Llano...
Thanks for the suggestions. I probably will end up replacing the pc with a budget build. I could get the hardware I need for sub $200 since i have a spare case and power supply, but I'd like to run Windows 7 on the new pc and that pushes the cost up a bit. Also going to put in a SSD, after having one of those in my HTPC I don't think I'll ever run the OS from a HD again in a new build. I use a GT440 in my HTPC and have been very happy with the performance.
Thanks in advance for any help. My dell e510 is struggling to play any local or networked HD content. The audio is great, but the video stutters. I currently have a Nvidia 7600 GT video card installed and it has served me well over the past 9 or so years. However, I would like to be able to play BluRay rips and HD home videos on the PC. I'm not sure if the video card (7600 GT) is the bottleneck or the processor itself. The PC is gigabit connected. I'd love to upgrade to...
Yes is the answer to your question. I'd recommend UltraVNC. Youtube or other browser based video applications will work just fine the way you describe in your original post. The sound will play through your receiver, video will appear on the TV. The only downside is if you are running a full screen directX application such as XMBC, it will need to be windowed before it can be viewed remotely. UltraVNC is free, so you could check it out and delete it if you aren't happy.
Why not just use the original DVD?
He did say the extra 8 GB is free from a coworker. I say take it.
I have a 3TB WD Green. If you power down your drives when they aren't in use I wouldn't recommend the green drives. They have built in power saving functions. I don't have data to back it up, but I think the extra wear and tear of the drive power saving and windows drive power saving is the reason I lost one of these drives a little while back. (The one I have now is the replacement for the failed drive.) I know you are looking internal, but I have a 3TB external seagate...
It almost sounds like the data isn't streaming from the drives fast enough to provide smooth video. I had a HD go bad and it would spin up, play for about 30 seconds, then the video would buffer and eventually fail. Is the problem on all videos on different drives? You might copy a video file to another drive and test that. Just trying to brainstorm a bit with you. Good luck.
May I ask how you are measuring your throughput rates? There's plenty of factors to consider when measuring speed of a network.Also, do you have the option to test the powerline adapters with the video before buying anything? If it were me I'd unplug the printer and move the adapter to the desired location in the house to test a BR stream. At least that way you'd know for sure without spending anything other than time.Best of luck....
Main title to MKV with audio track and forced subtitles. No idea what the format of the actual tracks is inside the mkv file. I'm happy in my ignorance. I don't see the reason to spend more time trying to make the file smaller and degrade the quality of the original track. Others may see it differently and factor in screen size, storage requirements, love of tinkering, etc...
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