or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by ArthurJ

Quote: Originally Posted by beanpoppa If it's so dangerous to lay a plasma on it's side, why don't manufacturers put tilt sensors on the boxes? It seems it would save the manufacturers a lot of $ in warranty claims if it's so dangerous to the TV? Some people say that they used to. Some people also claim that they still do, but it's hidden inside the case (sounds like mythology to me, but who knows?). In any case, this information is only of...
If you cared about contrast ratio, you would probably get a plasma panel instead of an LCD. Published numbers for both types and all brands are wildly exaggerated, but they can probably be used as a rough relative guide if you just divide by 10. If you want to see what the fuss is about, here's a set of examples comparing the photos of picture on an LCD screen (Westinghouse) and a plasma (Vizio) to the original digital image from the DVD:...
Quote: Originally Posted by martyj19 Personally, I trust Techniwizard, who may not be someone you would acknowledge to be an expert, but is definitely in the business of servicing plasmas. He is the one who said that the cells could be damaged and that the damage would show up down the road in shortened lifespan. Knowing something of how plasma cells are constructed, I find it difficult to picture how a cell could be damaged by flexing of the...
The pulse-width-modulation effect discussed in the above-referenced paper, which we are assuming is the cause of the rainbow effect on a plasma screen, affects LCDs equally. The paper discusses the effect mainly on LCDs, with a passing mention that it affects plasma screens too. It's far worse on single-chip DLPs because of the sequential color projection. On an LCD or plasma, what you're seeing from one RGB pixel in a 1/60th second frame interval might be something...
Here's a technical paper on how eye tracking interacts with pulse-width-modulated displays (including all DLP, plasma and LCD displays): http://www.poynton.com/papers/Motion...yal/index.html Their main point is that CRTs escaped this effect because the screens were small, resulting in small angle change for moving objects in the picture, and the persistence of CRT screen phosphors is very short. It seems to indicate the possibility of seeing rainbow effect on a...
I think we're mixing up some different effects here. Regarding LEDs: LEDs are a continuous monochromatic light source - they don't strobe or flicker. You could see them leave a strobing trail as your eyes move, but this is because your eyes move in microjumps and the LED brake lights are very bright. Regarding seeing rainbow effect with 3-chip DLPs: whatever you're seeing, it's not rainbow effect. 3-chip DLP systems don't have rainbow effect. If you see some sort...
There's no need to freak out about the possibility of hidden damage from transporting a plasma panel laying flat, as long as you're careful not to stress the glass so much that you break it. You'll get lots of dire warnings about it, but frankly nobody here is an expert on this topic - they're all speculating. I've seen lots of posts from people who said that they were forced to transport their plasma panel home from the store laying flat. They all said they were careful,...
It could be a defect, but the one-inch vertical strip pattern doesn't sound like any failure mode I've heard of on the Panasonic plasma, and the segments from which the panel is made aren't that shape. Just guessing from what you've described, but it sounds like a case of image retention - i.e., somebody displayed a bright 1-inch vertical strip down the right side of your screen for long enough to stick. That very typically causes the area to appear slightly blacker in...
Actually the test you folks are referring to was a test for 3:2 pulldown at 1080i, which has nothing to do with the original poster's question about SD, which is 480i. Most current sets, including Panasonic plasmas, pass the 480i test. Most current sets fail the 1080i test. In theory there's nothing stopping an LCD from having a good SD picture, but in practice most don't. Personally I think the problem is with their color processing, not the de-interlacer or the...
Technically all these points are correct, although you have to allow for some marketing hyperbole as usual. It's true that many LCDs cannot reproduce the full HD color gamut, but that's a relatively minor fault. Panasonic has recently made a big deal out of the fact that they've eliminated the need for leaded glass in their 2006 panels. LCD panels with flourescent backlights use some mercury, just as all flourescent lamps do. I think they're stretching a bit to...
New Posts  All Forums: