or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:

Posts by Johnnymenudo

Do you have a source? Thanks.
His estimate was that the CAD plans would be around $500.
Seems reasonable. He did say the plans are mine to keep if I don't hire him. Well, I already have plans for the riser, stage, soffit and layout that I would follow if I don't hire him. These were done by me with mechanical pencil and drafting tools - admittedly not CAD. I don't think there is anything to be gained for me by having an architect produce CAD plans, in fact I would likely have to ask him to change them to what I envision. My hunch, and part of why I...
Thanks. That is what I thought too but he is the "go to" guy for the local home theater designers and is well respected in the area. If this wasn't a completely framed room (the door is even in place) I would understand, but plans for the soffit and riser? I have always been accused of being a bit OCD about details myself, but the soffit is pretty much a do it on the job thing, and there is nothing about a riser or stage platform that requires a CAD draftsman.
I was speaking to a contractor to build out my room. The room is already framed, it just needs insulation, HVAC, electrical, drywall and finish work. It will be a basic build with a riser in the back and 2 rows of seating. Before the contractor even wants to bid, he wants to have his design guy come out, discuss my needs, and draw up plans for the room. These are not home theater plans per se, but are just construction plans. The draftsman is not doing anything in the...
Basement home theater in unfinished portion 25' X 17'. The room is right next to utlities, but due to a lot of duct work already running through the area, the ductwork for a 3rd zone with it's own supply and returns will be a challenge and will add quite a bit of labor cost. The guys have quoted me $6,000 for the third zone, and $3,000 to do the mitsubishi mini split. With the 3rd zone, heating the room is not too much of a concern, but keeping it cool when the room has...
Well, there might be some lean years. It will help if you can live cheap or have a supportive spouse who works.
I am not industry expert but I did something similar to what you propose from 1994 to 1999. I created high end audio rack systems with all the bells and whistles and kept cost fairly reasonable considering the products were a combination of premium hard woods, isolation bumpers, phenolic laminate shelving with high density fiberboard plinths for the actual shelves. Cool stuff and we actually did lab testing with accelerometers to show that it isolated your components...
Understood.If you want to be future proof, I think your speaker placementand number is adequate for casual music. I would not use in ceiling speakers for locations where you are going to be primarily stationary and want to enjoy a more immersive experience. I would use in wall speakers for those and set them up with spacing as you would for any critical listening position.If you ever think you will listen to music or watch tv in bed, wall speakers for front, in ceiling...
Can you give me an example of WHA control keypads?So are you saying that you would run a 14/4 to the keypad location and then splice in to the two 14/2 for the speakers and mark it so you could always ad volume later, or would you run 2 14/2 but have them cross a common point where you could splice in a keypad later?
New Posts  All Forums: