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Posts by sarangiman

Gagorian,Have you seen this thread:http://www.avsforum.com/t/1334832/new-high-contrast-high-power-discussion-thread/300I've been posting most of my images/measurements with the HCHP screen there.I definitely see the horizontal bands in your video, as well as vertical bands in your image. I have the same issues. I'm trying to swap it out for a Draper "Contrast Radiant" (Draper's version of the HCHP). Not sure what to expect; close up its texture looks like the HCHP, so it...
Sure. Too bad my actual HCHP screen had considerably less gain than the HCHP sample patches Da-Lite sent me. Because it was dirty... some dark residue all over. Curious to see how the Draper will turn out.But definitely want a high gain screen now... all the more given how much the sharpness increases with smaller iris (didn't pay close attention to just how much sharpness was affected previously).
Haha, Zombie, word.The Da-Lite HCHP is going back & I'm getting a Draper Contrast Radiant ('Onyx' fixed frame) 110". I still believe in the grey screen b/c they amplify reflections from scattered light less than white screens.If the Draper is also dirty or has a texture, I'll probably just go for the Draper Radiant (Draper's version of the HP). I'm fairly certain I'll prefer Draper's method of tensioning the screen anyway compared to Da-Lite's snaps. The snaps led to...
All fair points. But my knowing some of these things, one can can pump the last bit of performance out of their machines. For example, knowing all that I know about my HW50ES that I posted above, I know I can get a good deal of sharpness just by going with a high gain screen & limiting my Iris Open Reg. That's pretty cool.As for Nikon/Canon 2k+ lenses... you spend that much money on a lens, and if you're a professional, you need a lens that'll perform. So it's absolutely...
Your first statement is a bit of a generalization, but yes I get your point. Depending on what RC chooses to emphasize (which, in turn, depends on the quality of the noise/grain), though, it could sometimes amplify noise more than is desired. My point was simply that for some content it just doesn't work. Yes, I realize that's in the source, which is why I mentioned 'for some content' (season 1 of 'Breaking Bad' is another great example). So for content where RC just...
I know. But setting focus is actually not as easy as the method you suggested (albeit, it's a theoretically sound method!).The thing is, some of the softness is due to:Different areas of the image having different effective focal planes, possibly due to patches of the lens having different effective focal lengths or due to the chip not being perfectly flat or due to the lens being decentered (latter is not the case for me, since random patches go out of focus, not one side...
720/60p frame-packed 3D gaming is a no-go on my HW50ES. Ghosting is ridiculous.I just don't understand how the Epson can handle it though. That'd imply the Epson's technique of line-doubling/480Hz actually leads to faster effective frame response, which I'd figure would not only help 3D, but also motion resolution. But people claim Sony has better motion resolution.If only some review site properly quantitated this stuff.
Well, I find that with some movies I can't use RC (e.g. 'Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy') b/c of the inherent noise/grain that gets ridiculously amplified. Even with RC at 'min'. For that reason, I prefer optical sharpness. Which I can actually get my stopping down the lens (Iris Open Reg; 725, enable 'Auto Limited'). Of course, that doesn't work for 3D, which opens up the lens all the way. Maybe that's why I feel I need excessive RC with 3D (along with some report that 3D on...
Ok, if elements within the lens aren't multicoated properly to avoid internal reflections, then I can buy this argument. I'm guessing it's a combination of that & of selectively using more of the center of the lens. The latter likely has a good deal of impact, given how out of focus a good portion of my image becomes when I open up the iris (i.e. lens performance is quite poor).
Right; everything you said is what I said in my post. I'm a photographer, & projector owner, so admittedly quite possibly the worst kind of pixel peeper Just was surprised that no one else had mentioned the reason for the increased contrast when stopping down, just like increased MTF when stopping down a lens in photography. I didn't know it'd have that much of an effect on a projector (figured they wouldn't behave like poorly designed wide-aperture primes), but seeing how...
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