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Posts by bwaslo

pmsmith - Usually, making your own speakers isn't a great way to save money, it would probably cost you more in materials than just to buy some commercial ones that use equivalent quality parts (unless you already have drivers and crossover parts). Exceptions are for more exotic (and more rare) designs like constant directivity (SEOS, OS, Synergy) types which tend to be expensive in commercial forms. A big exception might be the "Econowave" concept (use an old existing...
I don't think it's that clear or simple, though. Though coaxial drivers have the same off-axis response all the way around them and act sort of like a single point driver, their off-axis response isn't likely to be the same as their on-axis response. Off-axis, you're likely to get the usual widening at the bottom of the tweeter range and narrowing just below that when the woofer part kicks in - the tweeter isn't big enough to keep directivity constant down to the...
Yes, they are if the frequency response is flat and the phase response is linear. It's the total response that matters, not of each driver. This is normal behaviour for limited band systems, rise time is related to bandwidth. Same sort of things happen as an analog in filter circuits, like crossovers. You can't just look at one part of the setup, the total that matters.Same answer, if the OVERALL response is flat at the phase is linear, you cannot do any better...
Hi MBentz, Maybe I'm a Synergy fanboy, but I have to disagree with you on a number of points. Normal compression drivers, and lots of plain old cone drivers also work with a wave traveling back and then bouncing forward again, but through the far-from-acoustically-opaque cone/diaphragm. Absorbing a back wave entirely is pretty hard to do without adequate depth for the wavelength involved (such as in B&W snail-like back chambers). So it's not like the Synergy is doing...
Regarding some comments earlier in this thread about the focus going from creativity to bargain hunting -- I'd just like to remind everyone that this particular forum and topic aren't all, or even a majority of the writeups or discussion about SEOS. There are a good number of described experiments and builds at the forum section at DIYsoundgroup. Erich, maybe for description about some of the kits you could just add a link to the DIYsoundgroup threads documenting their...
LT, The spectrum of a perfect square wave is a series of discrete tones at (only) odd harmonics of the square wave's fundamental, the level of each varying by 1/(harmonic number). So a 1Hz square wave will consist of the sum of tones at 1Hz (with some level, call it "A"), 3Hz (with level A/3), 5Hz (with level A/5), 7Hz with level A/7, etc., onward to infinity. It won't have a flat spectrum, and it won't have any DC content (though the 1Hz tone will be the highest). The...
The point of demodulation rings is to avoid the voice coil inductance changing as the cone goes in and out. It's like the crossover frequency changing as the cone moves Air core inductors avoid saturation at h igh AC cuurents, which occurs rather abruptly whem cirrent peaks too high on iron core inductors. But with higher efficiency speakers, that point is less likely to be reached because less imput power is required.
50ms is about 50 ft.... sound travels about 1.13ft per millisecond. So for 10 milliseconds between direct and backwave you'd need to be about 5ft from the wall behind.
Check: http://www.diysoundgroup.com/forum/index.php?board=14.0
I just didn't want anyone who might want to try it to get scared away. The wood horns are kind of fun to make, actually, a break from just doing boxes. Actually, if you get the midrange entries pretty much as close as you can to the tweeter throat (which is easiest with smaller mid drivers) , and do a quick HornResponse model (also not hard, get parameters from my spreadsheet and the drivers' Thiele/Smalls) to ballpark the port areas and back volumes , you're likely to...
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