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Posts by alluringreality

To most people the following is generally pointless, and all that really matters is that if you are going to lower the gamma control you will probably want to view the TV in dim room lighting, since lowering the gamma control might tend to obscure information near black in a brightly lit room.Reproducing an image without modification would be represented by an end to end gamma of 1.0, which just means the display gamma would be expected as the opposite of the gamma...
A higher display gamma number generally means the TV comes out of black more slowly. Basically the video information between black and white is expected to end up slightly darker with a 2.4 gamma than with a 2.2 gamma. Overall a 2.4 gamma intends to create an image that's actually darker than the originally photographed image, and a 2.4 gamma would assume you are watching the TV with very limited room lighting. Digital Video Essentials has a pattern that's intended to...
Yes, UHD may simply end up being current consumer video standards with a higher resolution, and in that case then I also think it's reasonable to suggest a TV with current connections. It's entirely possible that most of Rec. 2020 may never actually be adopted.http://www.itu.int/rec/R-REC-BT.2020/enhttp://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33199_7-57570365-221/ultra-hd-4k-and-beyond-rec-2020-glimpses-the-future-of-tvs/Personally I'd like a content solution that works if cable ever...
I generally remember the sort of time frame you're talking about. Many people didn't feel that 1080p deserved the additional cost at the time. Your alternate choices were generally to either pay more for 1080p models or to wait for 1080p prices to fall. According to google the first 1080p plasma was 2006, which would have came with the introduction of HD media and the 1080p game consoles. I'm thinking ATSC, cable, and satellite also offered HD before that time. Basically...
The way I read Cnet's PN60F8500 review, their calibrated TC-P60VT60 measured only 9.8 fL on a white field. That's rather dark for white on a TV, at around a third of the recommended white level for viewing in dim room lighting. I suppose using a gray with more blue might be brighter, yet another 5" of plasma screen probably wouldn't help with reducing brightness limiting. In the F8500 thread someone was complaining about watching hockey on the Samsung, and if the TV was...
The Sony and Samsung UHD demonstrations at Best Buy are pretty, and generally the TV prices seem to be falling rather quickly for first generation products. At some point there will likely be a limited price difference, so content is generally the limiting factor. While Sony does currently have the online product, Blu-ray and maybe things like satellite or fiber-optic cable are the most realistic alternate options. The Sony display looks a lot more similar to a 1080p...
The grayscale shift towards blue is rather common out of the box for many displays, and to me the rest of the pre-calibration information seems almost impressively bad. The post-calibration measurements don't appear to reveal anything overly glaring. I'll guess the 30% grayscale measurement might mean the TV gets a bit blue near black, similar to the Sound & Vision comments on the XBR-65X900A.Thanks for posting. Apparently I would currently have to travel out of state to...
There are a couple links at the bottom of the release notes.http://www.avsforum.com/t/948496/avs-hd-709-blu-ray-mp4-calibration/2340#post_19413135
Generally TV reviews seem to consider the F9000 somewhat similar to the F8000 at identical screen sizes, so they typically give the F9000 a lower grade due to the higher price. Between similar performance with current video content, higher prices, and reduced screen size, the F9000 might not really be an upgrade.Considering this is your position, the most rational thing to do at this time is probably to only consider 1080p TVs (F8000). Aside from Sony there currently isn't...
I agree this is in the HCFR information. My displays tend to drop gamma before they get to the limiting color(s), so that's why I was questioning if you had looked at the RGB values when adjusting contrast.I suggest ignoring colors on the luminance graph from HCFR, especially if they all do not have nearly identical RGB values at 100%. The luminance graph is normalized, so the colors are not relative to each other on the HCFR graph. The CalMAN luminance graph does not...
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