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Posts by hwjohn

I agree with you, which is why I think that the Naturalizer over does it a bit. It is more like watching an old film projector than a modern one. You still notice flicker today, but that is just and issue with 24p. Human eyes can pretty readily distinguish 24p flicker, which is why directors must be very careful with pans, lens selection, film, etc. It is unbelievable the trouble they will go through to get a shot right. I remember reading about a shot in the new...
I think you are correct about deinterlacing being done by the DRC chip, but it may depend on what type of deinterlacing needs to be done. Video mode deinterlacing is entirely different (and more complicated) than film mode. Video (this is camcorder type material) is almost always interlaced, but the kicker is that the fields (aEven, aOdd) are from two different times. If you shoot video in 30i, then aOdd is actually captured a 30th of a second later than aEven. This...
You can change the setting in the menu while the disc is playing... it does not gray out to deny you access. It basically turns itself off automatically without giving you notification when it sees that the signal does not require it. Again, I could see no difference at all with it on vs. off. If anyone else cares to take a look, that would be great.Well, I haven't studied how Blu-Ray is stored and investigated all the possibilities, so I cant give you a sure fire...
joefx, Thanks for the comment. In general, any good DVD player will probably perform the reverse pulldown better than the TV. You question about the reverse pulldown is a bit complicated, mainly because that term is used loosely. A true reverse pulldown "undoes" the entire operation to give you a 24p signal. A DVD player like the PS3, Oppo, or the A3000 for that matter, can't do a real reverse pulldown as I have it defined above. The reverse pulldown that is...
Ok, I just watched the same portion of 300 (a fight scene, chapter 14 I believe) about 20 times or more with various settings. I only used one setting at a time, so I can't speak for any interaction between the three. CineMotion - Can't tell a difference with any setting. It appears as if it is doing the right thing and turning itself off. I watched all three settings several times over as closely as I could, and could not see any difference at all. It would be...
I'll check it out with 300 when I get home today if I have time before my softball game. I'll see if my brother can bring over Underworld Evolution and check it too if I can. If you can find out a specific title that shows it really well, then I'll try to get it and check it too. I'm not saying that you or anyone else isn't seeing a real difference, but for me I have to have someone else turn the setting on and off so that I don't know if it is on or off. Then I can...
I'll put it to you this way... if you are going to notice lag, you will notice it most in a shooter like Halo. For example, several years ago my friend bought and RCA DLP (this was when they first came out). We were playing Halo 1 via system link, with him on his new DLP and us on a standard CRT. We were absolutely killing him, and couldn't figure out why. Then we switched TV's. We started getting killed. We finally figured out the DLP had video lag. It wasn't...
Zero lag for an A3000... or for that matter, XBR2. I have gamed extensively on both (360 and PS3).
You can check to see if the A3000 has a 24p input signal by looking at the on screen display. If it is recognized there, then it should be trivial for CineMotion to recognize it and turn itself (CineMotion) off. If it doesn't turn itself off, then it would seem as though Sony is doing something weird in processing the signal. If that is the case, then I don't suppose there is much point in further discussion until someone gets an explanation from Sony. I can't see...
A3000 has zero lag... I have been playing Halo 3 on it since it was released Monday night.
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