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Posts by johnqh

Actually, while ENCODING takes a lot of CPU power, capturing takes hardly any CPU. The DV stream was encoded by the camcorder, and the computer only does a copy. The only potential problem may be slow hard drive, not CPU. And that's not the issue either. I only want to easily switch between two camcorders without disconnecting/connecting all the time. I am not asking how to have both running. The problem is, when there are two camcorders connected, the 2nd one won't...
Has anyone tried this? I want to connect two miniDV camcorders to Windows PC. However, Windows cannot import/capture video from the second camcorder, with an error "insufficient system resources". I even used GraphEdit to check, and go the same result. I have tried on a desktop and a laptop, with the same result. I would like to know if there is some workaround. Why does this happen? Do I need multiple 1394 cards? On different buses? (for example one one PCI, one...
Hi Polygamy, How was your screen installed? Was it easy?
Actually you are right. Those TV's aren't computers. The scaling most likely uses a look-up table algorithm which takes time to initialize, so yes, anytime the input format changes, there will be a lag caused by that.
There are a lot of misconceptions about inherited quality of those two formats. First, they are digital formats, with the SAME video compression (MPEG-2, MPEG-4). Sure, they have different navigation, physical attributes of the disc, and storage. However, essentially, they use the same video format! You may ask "maybe they are decoded differently so the same MPEG-2/4 look better on HD DVD?" Not a chance. There is temperal compression involved. One key frame is...
Switching the signal will not cause significant lag. The output is the same - native resolution at 60hz. When the input resolution is different from the output, a scaler is involved. Thus, when the input resolution changes, the scaler needs to be reset. However, all of these are done digitally (meaning it is in the firmware program) and it takes very little time. Actually the second biggest reason for the lag is that the decoder would hold some # of frames in memory....
HD content will have some delay due to the video compression. Modern video compression (MPEG-1, 2, 4...) uses temperal compression, which means only key frames contain the whole information about the frame, and all other frames contain the difference to the previous (or previous + next) frames. Normally, a key frame occur per half second, but the content providers have the control to increase or decrease that. The decoder can only start decoding on a key frame. So,...
Quote: Originally Posted by Bud-man The biggest 4:3 lcd i ever saw was 20". i owned one from Costco's last winter for a short time and then returned it for the 27" Akai. You realized that when watching SDTV, the display area of the 27" widescreen is about the same as the 20" normal aspect ratio, right?
I am not saying black bar is not necessary occasionally. I am saying I want to choose the physical form according to watch I watch, and since I want a TV to watch SDTV, the physical TV should be 4:3. As I said, I watch the DVD with my front projector. There aren't much "great hd content" to miss. Comcast's HD offering is sad, and I don't plan to get Blue Ray or HD DVD yet. There is no point switching from the old 20" tube TV to a 20" LCD, so I am looking for...
tipstir, I don't want 4:3 content to be displayed in full screen mode on a 16:9 screen (as the 32 inch Trutech). I want the native dimension to be 4:3.
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