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Posts by sperron

The old 360 dashboard wasn't sharp when displayed in 1080p and the new dashboard isn't any better. However when displaying games or movies, the 360 and PS3 are equally sharp all other things being equal (obviously not in games with different rendering resolutions on each console). The biggest difference I see between the 2 consoles in the clear difference in gamma each one has. 360 games tend to be much darker then the same game on the PS3 after calibration.
Actually every single commercial DVD/Blu-Ray disc that has been tested by AVS members in the calibration forums has had luminance values in the 236-254 region (for example this post by aluring reality when he was testing you assumption). Mr D. who works in profession video production for films and TV also verified that films are mastered using the headroom area for "specular highlights" and other peak white information that should be visible. Stacy Spears has also done...
You can only receive 0-15 (16 is black when using limited limited) if you turn on "superwhite" when you are using limited. If the "superwhite" setting is off the PS3 clips 0-15 and 236-254 when using limited. If you calibrate the PS3 correctly, both limited and RGB full look nearly identical (assuming the TV in question doesn't have any quirks that make one or the other not optimal). The only downside to choosing one or the other is the possibility of introducing banding...
The problem you are describing goes away when you use a HDMI cable, so it is a component cable only problem. The black level problem has existed from the beginning with the 360 BC and apparently has never been addressed. For some reason the 360 remaps the video levels in the game before it outputs them and it's remapping "black" from the games to a video level that is obviously not black as far as your TV is concerned. My solution was just to adjust the "brightness"...
Assuming this is a relatively modern Sony TV, what you really want to do is adjust the color decoder using the approprriate sevice menu settings rather then hoping one of the "AXIS" defaults is correct (assuming Sony even uses the "AXIS" service menu setting for that purpose anymore). What you should do is to change the "AXIS" value back to whatever number it was before you changed it. If you are dead set on properly adjusting your color decoder, you should do a search...
What happens is that every HDTV has a certain amount of time it takes between receiving a frame of the video coming in and actually displaying it. What it does during this time is process the incoming signal. All those options in your TVs menu as well as things that are done by default are applied to the incoming picture before it can be displayed. What you are seeing is not only this processing time, but also the time it takes the PS3 to process the raw PS2 rendered video...
They certainly don't look "better". They just look different. Some people like the blurrier look. Some people don't. It's all subjective.
Everything I've ever read has said it's disc specific. People have in fact popped in different DVDs back to back and see differences in the optimizer test patterns. Michael TLV from this forum who trains people to be THX certified calibrators has said that it's per disc only.All the THX site says is:http://www.thx.com/home/dvd/optimizer/index.htmlWhich is worded rather ambiguously. What it does not say is that the patterns on the disc are suitable to calibrate your...
Here's a link to a comparison I did almost 2 years ago: http://www.hdtvarcade.com/hdtvforum/...howtopic=11408 Basically the PS3 adds a blur filter to the PS2 games by default before it upscales, so there is no way to not get a blurrier image then you would get out of a PS2. The only options the PS3 offers you make the image even blurrier then the already blurry default image. Any pixelation that was already there on an actual PS2 is still there on the PS3, but with a...
Once you calibrate your tv to match you will see virtually the same thing (provided that your TV doesn't have some quirk that prevents you from calibrating it correctly). What you will get with games that render to PC levels is a compression of the orignal 255 levels down to 216 levels which could potentially result in banding. If you have no intention of watching video based content on the console and have a display that stores each input's settings seperately, then...
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