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Posts by JHAz

Wait, you gave the speakers beer?
Neighbors problems are not about in room volume. If the sub is making 40 hz tones they will be just as strong next door or upstairs or downstairs as in your room unless the structure is unusual. Weak enough to not bother neighbors might mean weak enough to be inaudible in your room.
FWIW< for me, on balance, the improved sound. But not necessarily because of the lossless formats (although I'll always find the PCM or lossless encode if the disk doesn't default there). Instead, in large part because the custom has been to use higher bitrate lossy so even on a lossy BD, you're at least very very close to lossless sound. With my 42 in (OMG is's so ancient) display at my seating distances, I probably cannot distinguish 1080 versus 720. Although to...
I honestly don't know. I honestly am quite sure that if the two approaches were different, it would mean that the pink noise wasn't pink noise (ie precisely averaging equal power per octave all the time, like it's supposed to).* Nor do I care to fiddle with it any more. IOW you may be right but it doesn't matter. Like I said. Feel free to be as offended as you desire to be.*I also feel pretty confident that my RatShack meter cannot pull out real peaks in real content...
Ah, missed the china ref (kinda a big deal) halfway through the thread . . . if you could know you could do (or have done) some woodworking, I'd consider bringing an appropriate Eminence or other commercial bass driver because I'd expect nothing will be cheap to get (for real) over there. Although if you happen upon a real rolex daytona for 200 bucks, I'll gladly give you $400 for it and pay shipping . . . . OTOH, if you're going to be in an apartment, fear the bass. ...
what's the test signal? Looks clearly to be more than a -70dBFS level. If it's 0dBFS, then in all likelihood at my typical listening levels the highest jitter shown is well below the noise floor. Actually below zero for average levels. I haven't, however, been exposed to anything I think is a reasonably accurate listening test for audible effects of jitter. But if "sounds" whether spurious or otherwise, below the audible threshold can affect the reproduction of music...
why change subs at all? the more competent sub will either be better (reducing distortion at high levels that you might not have even noticed) or just as good as the new sub, and all you can do is lose money on the old one to move to the new one
yes and no. What we know is that based on the physical laws of our universe, at any given voltage, no amplifier anywhere can possibly deliver more current than allowed by the law (essentially it's Ohm's law but it gets a little more complex with AC signals). We also know that no amp anywhere in our universe can deliver LESS current at any given voltage than the physical laws of the universe require. As it happens, the maximum and minimum are EXACTLY the same number. ...
Kids, with steady state test signals fast and slow on your spl meter make zero difference afaik. When nothing changes, how fast you track changes becomes irrelevant.
ohm's law controls what actually happens. You could play around with it here http://www.ohmslawcalculator.com/ohms_law_calculator.phpif 200 watts is high power, at 8 ohms, it's 40 volts and 5 amps, at 4 ohms, it's about 28 volts and 7 amps. At 2 ohms, it's 20 volts and 10 amps.if you set the amp so that it is delivering 200 watts at 8 ohms, it is, by definition, putting out 40 volts. If you change the impedance of the connected device and change nothing else the amp...
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