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Posts by Gorilla83

As far as room you really only "need" a foot or two on each side of the machine as well as space for loading sheet goods or whatever you plan to cut. As you're probably seen from their site, the 4x8 bots are about 6' wide x 10' long in footprint.CAD - The learning curve will vary quite a bit depending on which software package you choose. You can start with something as simple as google sketchup and work your way to an Autodesk or Solidworks. It's quite different from...
Honestly if you can upgrade for 200-250ish the crest might NOT be a terrible idea. I've been toying with the idea myself.
To give you some idea for frame of reference, I sold my 12" x 18" desktop setup used with a basic router with no software or bits for 1000. The cheapest useful 4x4 kits I know of will generally run you in the 4-5000 range with electronics but without any software. An assembled unit like a 4x4 shopbot will run you in the 12-16k range delivered.As an example, here is a basic mechanical 4x4 kit using aluminum extrusions (bolt together) - you would need to add all...
It took me a good 3-4 months to find something local, but I wound up picking up my machine from a local high-end kitchen/bath/custom woodworking center. They used the machine for prototypes and such so it wasn't used a ton and barely even had any scratches on it. I have under 10k into everything including the machine, electronics, wiring, and my DIY vac box. New everything would be in the mid 20s somewhere. My machine is in my workshop/shed and it's 13x34. The shopbot...
For recreational use (like you and I) the key maintenance is just keeping the rails clean and rack greased. Otherwise every few months you would check for play in pinion gears, etc. If you're looking at a new machine the maintenance would be very minimal. For a few examples, here is a recommended list from Shopbot - I think many of these are way overkill if you're not running the machine 12+ hours a day....
Dave - The dust collectors move alot of air (CFM) but generally pull very little vacuum. You will need/want something that will hold 8-10+ hg and flow 200+cfm minimum.As far as the spindle vs. Router - the spindle will last MUCH longer, operate quieter, far more powerful, and they are rebuildable should they come to that. The spindle is the industrial solution vs. A hobbyist router setup. The collet choices are also more substantial with a spindle.I'm running a Colombo...
The setup I'm building uses 4 of the 240V lighthouse motors that are very common among the shopbot guys. I "borrowed" a baffle design from one of the members there and made a few tweaks to accommodate all 4 motors running in parallel. Collectively they will pull 9-10" hg and flow 380-400+cfm which is WAY more than I will need for most sheet goods. Total cost under 850 including motors, gaskets, electrical, and the box itself. Even used the machine to cut the panels....
Dave,In general there are two types of vacuum pump setups:1) High hg, low CFM - These would typically be smaller pumps (like the one you mentioned earlier) that will pull a lot of vacuum (Hg) with very low airflow. This would be used in holding down very small parts with gasketed jigs that are NOT cut all the way through to completely seal the workpiece to the table.2) High CFM, low hg - This is a more typical setup for holding down large sheets of plywood, etc where the...
SOLD
Storage for flux capacitors. Nah, my sump pump(s) are under those risers. They used to be a lot higher and I cut them down to the point where the plumbing is nearly touching. Acoustically those positions aren't great for subs anyway though as I've discovered after sweeping nearly every available position from the front wall back to the bar. Right in the middle of the room I'm getting some solid room gain and easily flat to single digits without any significant bumps or...
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