The Mummy Blu-ray Review

An ancient princess is awakened from her crypt beneath the desert, bringing with her malevolence grown over millennia, and terrors that defy human comprehension.

The Review at a Glance:
(max score: 5 )

Film:

Extras:

Audio/Video total rating:
( Max score: 100 )

90

Details:

Studio and Year: Universal – 2017
MPAA Rating: PG-13
Feature running time: 110 minutes
Genre: Action/Adventure/Fantasy

Disc Format: BD-50
Encoding: AVC
Video Aspect: 2.40:1
Resolution: 1080p/24

Audio Format(s): English Dolby Atmos, Dolby TrueHD 7.1, French/Spanish DTS 5.1
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish
Starring: Tom Cruise, Annabelle Wallis, Sofia Boutella, Jake Johnson, Courtney B. Vance, Russell Crowe
Directed by: Alex Kurtzman
Music by: Brian Tyler
Written by: David Koepp, Christopher McQuarrie, Dylan Kussman
Region Code: A,B,C

Release Date: September 12, 2017

“Ancient Evil Returns”



My Take:

Thought safely entombed deep beneath the desert, an ancient princess (Sofia Boutella) whose destiny was unjustly taken from her is awakened in our current day. Her malevolence has grown over millennia and with it come terrors that defy human comprehension.

The lineage of The Mummy harkens back to Universal Studio’s early days or wonderment via it’s classic tales of monsters and eerie things that go bump in the night. Unfortunately, there is little about this film that is reminiscent of its ancestors. Created and helmed by filmmakers that have had great success with blockbuster films, it throws together a shallow and rushed action/adventure, that is seemingly designed to kick off a series, but doesn’t take the time to generate an interesting threshold. The narrative threads are short, failing to capture the essence of the iconic subject matter, while blending in an assortment of elements that attempt to tie in future endeavors.

The action is fine, but nothing we haven’t seen done before, with a stronger script, the production elements are solid, and the casting is just okay, save for Boutella, who always manages to steal the show, despite being covered from head to toe in make-up. I would have much preferred a slower boil, that carefully stirred in its flavors, introducing its characters, plot, and the start of the narrative threads that lead or hinted at what is yet to come. It all felt very rushed, overtly serious, and lacking any semblance of the creep factor necessary to support its namesake. The smattering of humor felt forced and lacked the good, campy, fun of the Brendan Fraser Mummy series.

The Mummy has minimal value as mindless entertainment, as it purports to be more than that, given its subplots. It also kind of misses the mark as a popcorn flick, but probably comes closer to that than anything else. At the end of the day I was a bit bored with it and had hoped for better. I am not sure what the future holds, but I will try and keep an open mind should there be another installment.

Replay Value:

Parental Guide:

The rating is for violence, action, and scary images, and for some suggestive content and brief nudity.

AUDIO/VIDEO – By The Numbers:
REFERENCE = 92-100/EXCELLENT = 83-91/GOOD = 74-82/AVERAGE = 65-73/BELOW AVERAGE = under 65

**My audio/video ratings are based upon a comparative made against other high definition media/blu-ray disc.**

Audio: 94
(Each rating is worth 4 points with a max of 5 per category)

  • Dynamics: 
  • Low frequency effects: 
  • Surround Sound presentation: 
  • Clarity/Detail: 
  • Dialog Reproduction: 

 

Video: 92
(Each rating is worth 4 points with a max of 5 per category)

 

  • Resolution/Clarity:
  • Black Level/Shadow Detail:
  • Color Reproduction:
  • Fleshtones:
  • Compression:

 

Dolby Atmos Rating: 88
(Each rating is worth 4 points with a max of 5 per category)

 

  • Level of immersion: 
  • Soundstage integration: 
  • Audio object placement: 
  • Effectiveness: 
  • Entertainment factor: 

 

The Mummy comes to Blu-ray Disc from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment featuring 1080p AVC encoded video that has an average bitrate of 32 Mbps and lossless Dolby Atmos/TrueHD 7.1 sound that has an average bitrate of 3.9 Mbps. .[/b]

This is an excellent video presentation that boasts plenty of high level detail, bold use of contrast, and rewarding depth. Other some innate softening due to the extensive use of CGI resolution is solid. Blacks have excellent dynamic range with visible gradational highlights. Visual perspective in low lighting and darkened areas is excellent. The combination gives dark scenes appreciable dimension. Images are punchy, clearly drawn, eye catching and perfectly suited for the source material.

The lossless 7.1 Dolby TrueHD (Atmos Core) soundtrack has solid dynamic range, detail rich clarity and makes excellent use of the entire surround platform to drive the film’s elements. The music score, coupled along with the integration of discrete and ambient sound effects, plays an intricate role in this active surround mix. The detection of subtle background sounds, off camera cues and spatial dimension within the room’s acoustic environment makes for a notably enveloping surround experience. Low frequency effects can be room energizing as the subwoofer works in tandem with the rest of the system to convey the low-level bass and dynamic impact associated with the action based sequences. Dialog is firmly planted in the center channel and clearly renders voices and effects with appropriate distinction and balance within the front soundstage. I thought this audio presentation made for an entertaining home theater experience.

In listening to the Dolby Atmos surround mix I found it to be of the moderately active variety. Its use of audio objects placed above is a mix of atmospherics, discrete effects and occasional panning fills. This is done well when implemented and creates an enriching level of immersion that coincides with the onscreen events nicely. Examples can be found during the unleashing of Ahmanet in the first act or the plummeting airplane sequence. The entire soundstage is used to place you inside the aircraft as it tumbles, rolls and lists, tossing the occupants from floor, to wall, to ceiling. The music score is subtly mixed over the platform so as to add natural depth to its orchestrated elements without drawing attention away from the thematic details of what is transpiring onscreen. While this mix doesn’t make constant use of room traversing audio objects, I found myself completely involved when it mattered and found this to be an enjoyable audio presentation that complimented the source material.

Bonus Features:

  • Disc 1: The Mummy Ultra HD Blu-ray
    Disc 2: The Mummy Blu-ray
  • Feature Commentary
  • Deleted/Extended Scenes
  • Cruise & Kurtzman: A Conversation
  • Rooted in Reality
  • Life in Zero-G: Creating the Plane Crash
  • Meet Ahmanet
  • Cruise in Action
  • Becoming Jekyll and Hyde
  • Choreographed Chaos
  • Nick Morton: In Search of a Soul
  • Ahmanet Reborn: Animated Graphic Novel
  • Digital HD Copy

Final Thoughts:

The Mummy had lots of weight behind it in star Tom Cruise and a successful creative team, unfortunately it just doesn’t have the chops to make for a solid horror/action/thriller. It comes to Blu-ray from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment featuring excellent high definition audio/video, including a complimentary Dolby Atmos sound mix, and a fan friendly assortment of extras that are worth exploring. The Mummy is a swing and miss, but it probably worth checking out for its presentation on Blu-ray.

 

Ralph Potts
AVS Forum Blu-ray Reviews

Reference Review System:

JVC DLA-RS500 3D/4K Ready High Definition Front Projector
(Calibrated with Calman 5 & C6-HDR Meter from Spectracal)
Stewart Filmscreen – Studiotek 130 G3 100” 16×9 Screen
Carada Masquerade Electronic Horizontal Masking System
Marantz AV8802A 13.2 Channel Audio/Video Processor
Sherbourn Technologies – 7/200 Seven Channel Amplifier
B&K Reference 200.7 Series 2 Seven Channel Amplifier
Oppo UDP-203 Ultra HD Blu-ray Player
Sony Playstation 3 Blu-ray disc Player
System Controller: Apple iPad/iRule Pro HD Universal Remote Control
Canton “Ergo” and Canton In-Ceiling Series Speakers
SVS Ultra Surrounds (Gloss Finish in Bipolar Configuration)
SVS PB-13 Ultra (Rosenut finish)
SVS SB-13 Ultra (Piano Gloss finish)
Panamax M5400-PM Power Conditioner/Surge Protector
Wireworld, Better Cables (Silver Serpent) – Audio/Video/Speaker Cabling
Cool Components – CP-CP102 cooling package