or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Official Denon AVP-A1HD/AVP-A1HDCI and POA-A1HD/POA-A1HDCI owners thread.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Official Denon AVP-A1HD/AVP-A1HDCI and POA-A1HD/POA-A1HDCI owners thread. - Page 813

post #24361 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJHT View Post

Given the amount of work that would take, tooooo much. I will let everyone know what I think, but the rooms and other equipment would not be the ideal AB type of comparison. SJ

Don't blame you, I wouldn't bother pulling everything apart. You would be able to get an idea once handling the unit etc.
post #24362 of 25955
I'm just glad that both setups will work very similar. Learning curve for the Marantz setup should be simple. Besides the equipment differences, the rooms are totally different. Family room is wide open in our home vs. the HT. The family room has always been the room to get the equipment from the HT when I upgraded over the years. Besides the TV, I think the Marantz stack is the first piece of equipment that I purchased for that room. Although the rest ain't bad. wink.gif. Had to recently move my "old" Oppo 93 to that room when I got the 105. smile.gif. SJ
post #24363 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

Wow!!!

This update for DenonLink delivered SACD/DSD multichannel audio (restoring LFE levels) is a huge win.

I've been listening to SACDs since yesterday and I'm re-discovering great music. My Genesis collection is getting a workout, and several other classical pieces are now reproduced in their full glory. Organ pieces now have 32' pipes with real authority. The house shakes as it should

So for anyone with a DenonLink tethered player, do the firmware update *NOW*, then go re-listen to your mch-SACDs.

That's a quote from myself back from March of 2012. I usually get this stuff right, so not sure what happened between then and now.

I do believe they fixed something, but it was still not quite what I expected, at least compared to the authority of many DVD-A's. So I think my recent 'problem' with missing LFE is that the recordings I'd been listening to this winter are all in the 'wimpy' bass category, where the mix is bass-deficient.

I'll have to put that Organ music SACD back in today and see.

anyway, at least I can adjust 'preference' with a flick of the finger now ;-)

I'll report back tomorrow with some measurements as well.
post #24364 of 25955
I just finished watching 'Dredd' with optimized DTS HD MA 7.1 soundtrack, optimized for Neo:X 11.1 - which means additional tracks encoded in sub-bands - in 9.2 configuration with heights with my AVP and I am mesmerized by the sound quality. This is absolutely overwhelming what the AVP does.

I did the Pro measurement and my room is not the best, however, the AVP is absolutely the best unit, I ever heard. I remember DTS Neo:X in - I call it - simulation mode for heights channels. This was not very good. Since I own the Audionet power amps, I always switched Neo:X off and listened with the respective decoder only, no post-processing.
I mean, I want to be fair, I did not listen to a Neo:X optimized track before, however, the AVP does an excellent job.

I am a very happy owner of the AVP.biggrin.gif

PS: DEQ should be always on for Audyssey XT32. Not for XT, there it is optional, says Chris from Audyssey.
post #24365 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I just finished watching 'Dredd' with optimized DTS HD MA 7.1 soundtrack, optimized for Neo:X 11.1 - which means additional tracks encoded in sub-bands - in 9.2 configuration with heights with my AVP and I am mesmerized by the sound quality. This is absolutely overwhelming what the AVP does.

I did the Pro measurement and my room is not the best, however, the AVP is absolutely the best unit, I ever heard. I remember DTS Neo:X in - I call it - simulation mode for heights channels. This was not very good. Since I own the Audionet power amps, I always switched Neo:X off and listened with the respective decoder only, no post-processing.
I mean, I want to be fair, I did not listen to a Neo:X optimized track before, however, the AVP does an excellent job.

I am a very happy owner of the AVP.biggrin.gif

PS: DEQ should be always on for Audyssey XT32. Not for XT, there it is optional, says Chris from Audyssey.

I agree. NEO:x is great I use for music CD's. PLIIz for TV. Direct multi-ch music. DEQ though I did some listening comparisons and found it to alter music listening way too far from the original mix. As I have said here before I love bass and is why I have two subs, one front facing 12" & the other with two 12" down facing. I have not treated the room yet, which could be and probably is most of the problem. Can clap in room and hear a slight echo, this i know is the cause heard in the high end, shrill at high listening. I have to raise the volume of the two subs +7db to get music where I expect the bass response to be. Bass pedals should rock the house, without raising the subs its very weak.

Just love how I can push the Enter-center button on Denon remote to adjust individual speaker volume, and if needed change the processing with the STD on the remote screen. Don't have to go into setup menus.
Edited by dahlgren - 1/26/13 at 12:13pm
post #24366 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I just finished watching 'Dredd' with optimized DTS HD MA 7.1 soundtrack, optimized for Neo:X 11.1 - which means additional tracks encoded in sub-bands.
Just a small clarification, Neo:X's additional signals are not in sub-bands. They are right out in the open for everyone to hear. It's just the use of "phantom" signal in front/surround (wides) or front/rear (heights). The Neo:X decoder knows where to look, and steers the signals accordingly.
post #24367 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Just a small clarification, Neo:X's additional signals are not in sub-bands. They are right out in the open for everyone to hear. It's just the use of "phantom" signal in front/surround (wides) or front/rear (heights). The Neo:X decoder knows where to look, and steers the signals accordingly.

Robert, as far as I know, in the case of Expendables 2 and Dredd the signals are in the soundtrack.

Please read this: "The extra channels come courtesy of the new DTS Neo:X codec which includes support for speakers in the front mounted both high and wide to create more of a 3D audio effect that can simulate planes flying overhead or a car driving past. While those who have upgraded their receivers and added extra speakers will mostly experience the effect thanks to upmixing, it does allow for an 11.1 audio track with the extra channel info matrixed into a standard 7.1 audio track."

This is from here: http://www.engadget.com/2012/10/10/the-expendables-2-blu-ray-dts-neo-x-11.1/ and there are other sources. Just search for 'Expendables 2 DTS Neo:X'

These four additional tracks are somehow matrixed into the 7.1 channels, I read something about sub-bands. Please check it out yourself and please correct me again, if I am wrong.

Markus
post #24368 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

Robert, as far as I know, in the case of Expendables 2 and Dredd the signals are in the soundtrack.
That's what I said. And who is Robert? rolleyes.gif
Quote:
These four additional tracks are somehow matrixed into the 7.1 channels,
Exactly. Matrixing is just a specific form of mixing.
Quote:
I read something about sub-bands. Please check it out yourself and please correct me again, if I am wrong.
I have checked it out in great detail, and am intimately familiar with how Neo:X encoding works. I think you can find a video tutorial by Fred Maher on twit tv, IIRC.

.
Edited by Roger Dressler - 1/26/13 at 11:51pm
post #24369 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

That's what I said. And who is Robert? rolleyes.gif
Exactly. Matrixing is just a specific form of mixing.
I have checked it out in great detail, and am intimately familiar with how Neo:X encoding works. I think you can find a video tutorial by Fred Mahr on twit tv, IIRC.

I am sorry Roger for the 'Robert'. Sorry about this.

But, honestly, it is not just added by post-processing. It is encoded in the soundtrack.
Edited by Ganymed4 - 1/26/13 at 8:52pm
post #24370 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I am sorry Roger for the 'Robert'. Sorry about this.
No problem at all.
Quote:
But, honestly, it is not just added by post-processing. It is encoded in the soundtrack.
I am quite familiar with the how the process works. I think we are getting hung up on terminology and losing sight of the process.

Let's take a simple example of a "matrix" encoder: a 3-channel source (L/C/R) that we want to deliver in a 2-channel program. The C signal gets "encoded" into the L and R channels, in this case with an equal level signal in each, at a level of -3 dB. That's how Dolby Surround works, and it is how Neo:X encodes a wide channel into the front and surround channels. Then the decoder is tuned to detect those signals and derive speaker output signals.

Did you not check out the video I mentioned? Here's the link.
post #24371 of 25955
Hi, all

I just purchased an used AVP and POA, but later find out that POA has two channel that is not working and front center meter not working as well

Am thinink of just upgrading to MC8207 instead, will this setup sounds better or work with with the AVP than with POA?
Thanks
post #24372 of 25955
^^^

If your POA has a problem, having it serviced will be likely much cheaper than replacing it. The POA and AVP are designed as a cohesive system, no other amp will give you the flexibility a POA will when used with the AVP.
From a sound perspective, owners on this thread rave about their POAs performance.

As for the Mac amps, several members here love and use them with their AVP and report excellent results. Just search the thread for McInstosh or amp model number, you'll get several hits.
post #24373 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I am sorry Roger for the 'Robert'. Sorry about this.

But, honestly, it is not just added by post-processing. It is encoded in the soundtrack.

Ganymed4, Just as a heads up: Roger probably knows more about surround systems and how they work than all of us on this forum combined. He was one of the principals at Dolby Labs. If he says something works a certain way, I'd take his word over some random Engadget writers words any day.
post #24374 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

Ganymed4, Just as a heads up: Roger probably knows more about surround systems and how they work than all of us on this forum combined. He was one of the principals at Dolby Labs. If he says something works a certain way, I'd take his word over some random Engadget writers words any day.

That is correct.
post #24375 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

Ganymed4, Just as a heads up: Roger probably knows more about surround systems and how they work than all of us on this forum combined. He was one of the principals at Dolby Labs. If he says something works a certain way, I'd take his word over some random Engadget writers words any day.

Not about my surround system !!, i have hidden a speaker in a unknown location ! unless someone spilled the beans he has no clue smile.gif

Daniel.
post #24376 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

No problem at all.
I am quite familiar with the how the process works. I think we are getting hung up on terminology and losing sight of the process.

Let's take a simple example of a "matrix" encoder: a 3-channel source (L/C/R) that we want to deliver in a 2-channel program. The C signal gets "encoded" into the L and R channels, in this case with an equal level signal in each, at a level of -3 dB. That's how Dolby Surround works, and it is how Neo:X encodes a wide channel into the front and surround channels. Then the decoder is tuned to detect those signals and derive speaker output signals.

Did you not check out the video I mentioned? Here's the link.

I agree to your point of view and I also agree that it is more a wording problem. I also clearly say and know, that this is a 7.1 soundtrack and NOT an 11.1 soundtrack on the disks.
I will check out the video you send the link, but didn't had time to do so. Thank you.

To the other guys, thank you for your advice, explaining my who Roger is. I am a sound engineer but I have much less experience than Roger and I am also not an expert for coding of surround tracks.

However, I do not see a mismatch in our opinions. I completely agree to Rogers explanation above. This is, I believe, what was meant by 'matrixed' in the Engadget article.

Greetings

Markus
post #24377 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonFo View Post

^^^

If your POA has a problem, having it serviced will be likely much cheaper than replacing it. The POA and AVP are designed as a cohesive system, no other amp will give you the flexibility a POA will when used with the AVP.
From a sound perspective, owners on this thread rave about their POAs performance.

As for the Mac amps, several members here love and use them with their AVP and report excellent results. Just search the thread for McInstosh or amp model number, you'll get several hits.

Thanks JonFo
But assuming that I don't have to spend anything if replacing the MC8207 will you go for it? or would you rather stay and service the POA?
MC8207 does have extra 50watt per channel, and I have Martinlogan Montis and Stage in my system.
post #24378 of 25955
@Roger Dressler

While we are on the subject of matrixing.....................

Do you have any clue what the "THX Pro Logic" mode in the AVP menu is all about? I posted about this a couple of months ago here and I also wrote to Denon. The response I got back from Denon is nice and explanatory about the modes but they failed to answer my question as to whether it is based on PL or PLII modes. I find it hard to believe it would be based on the original PL mode but in all the other Denon menus, they clearly specify PLII and even PLIIx. The differences between the 2 modes (PL and PLII) I think are fairly dramatic so I was wanting to get it clarified. I think you also developed the PLII mode so maybe you can say if any company even uses the old PL mode anymore - maybe I should just assume it is based on PLII mode? Many thanks for any info or suggestions!

MY QUESTION TO DENON SUPPORT:

What exactly is "THX PRO LOGIC" mode?

In the menus, it clearly lists a THX Movie and a THX Pro Logic and this makes me think it is a music mode but I cannot find any information about it anywhere. Since the AVP is the only THX pre/pro from Denon, and this appears to be some proprietary mode of Denon's or THX, I think there needs to be a detailed technical explanation of what this mode is all about.

Is it some form of the original PRO LOGIC mode (that dates from the 70's), or is it based on PRO LOGIC II or PRO LOGIC IIx?


DENON RESPONSE:

THX Pro Logic doesn't’t exist, the same as THX dts doesn't’t. THX is a post processing algorithm that adds to the effect of the DSP mode at hand. THX can be added to any of the Main stream version of DSP processing.

DTS and Dolby in any flavor that is 5.1 or greater are Encoded material. This content is intended to be played back in a specific manner and from a specific channel. Anything less than a 5.1 encoded signal must be processed by the AVR’s DSP processor and create an effect. This requires the original signal to be processed and have delay added to it for proper playback in the listening area.

THX Adds additional correction to the playback of the signal. http://www.thx.com/

Re-EQ Many movie soundtracks are mixed in studios for playback in large cinema auditoriums with an array of speakers. When played on home systems, they may appear abrasive and edgy. Re-EQ establishes a more accurate tonal balance when enjoying movies in your home.

Timbre Matching Your ears hear different tonal qualities in sounds coming from different directions. Timbre Matching restores the frequency balance between your front and surround speakers—ensuring seamless and smooth panning between the front to back of the room.

Boundary Gain Compensation (BGC) Sitting near a wall may result in distorted bass response. BGC corrects the way low frequency sound is perceived when seated near a wall. This results in a more true and accurate bass response.

Adaptive Decorrelation Adaptive Decorrelation changes one surround channel’s time and phase relationship with respect to the other surround channel, expanding the listening position and creating the same spacious audio experience at home as in a movie theater.

As you will see from the THX site, link listed in the THX logo above, THX Pro logic doesn’t exist. But the ability to add THX correction to a DSP mode does.
post #24379 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I agree to your point of view and I also agree that it is more a wording problem. I also clearly say and know, that this is a 7.1 soundtrack and NOT an 11.1 soundtrack on the disks.
Then we are in complete agreement.
Quote:
However, I do not see a mismatch in our opinions. I completely agree to Rogers explanation above. This is, I believe, what was meant by 'matrixed' in the Engadget article.
Good. Then we also agree that "sub-bands" have no place in the discussion of Neo:X encoding. If any questions remain at all, please feel free.
post #24380 of 25955
Yes thank you Roger and I have a question:

What is your opinion about these matrixed channels? Can they be seen as - let's say - 'full channels'? Or are they only some helpful enhancements, containing less information than a - I would call it - discrete channel?

I am asking because I was really surprised how much information came from these channels, at least in 'The Expendables 2'. 'Dredd' was different, there it was more ambient sound - at least my listening experience.

Thank you in advance.
post #24381 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillyJ View Post

@Roger Dressler

While we are on the subject of matrixing.....................

Do you have any clue what the "THX Pro Logic" mode in the AVP menu is all about?

DENON RESPONSE:

THX Pro Logic doesn't exist, the same as THX dts doesn't. THX is a post processing algorithm that adds to the effect of the DSP mode at hand. THX can be added to any of the Main stream version of DSP processing.
Their answer is correct. So the question comes down to this: Does the AVP offer a basic Pro Logic mode? If so, THX may be added to it. If not, then there is no way to get Pro Logic operation, regardless of whether THX is on or off.

The PLII algorithm has various modes, the most common of which are Movie and Music. It also has a Pro Logic mode (like Movie mode but with mono surrounds rolled off at 7 kHz). Other than some Sony AVRs I'm not sure many products used it.
post #24382 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

What is your opinion about these matrixed channels? Can they be seen as - let's say - 'full channels'? Or are they only some helpful enhancements, containing less information than a - I would call it - discrete channel?
They are not restricted in their capability -- it is just how a new signal is mixed into the existing channels. That new signal may be the same as any other signal carried in the soundtrack.
Quote:
I am asking because I was really surprised how much information came from these channels, at least in 'The Expendables 2'. 'Dredd' was different, there it was more ambient sound - at least my listening experience.
If that ambient sound is audible with direct 7.1 playback, then that is an aspect of the mix.

If that ambience s only apparent when Neo:X is used, then we are talking about the decoder. Neo-X is a newer breed of surround decoder, unlike PLII or Logic7. Those are wideband decoders (no frequency selectivity in the signal path), whereas Neo:X (like Neo:6 before) are frequency selective. That means sounds in part of the spectrum can be handled differently than other sounds in different parts of the spectrum, all at the same time. It's like having multiple decoders running in parallel.
post #24383 of 25955
Thank you very much for this answer. I learned something and very interesting. This is information I never saw before somewhere else.

Sorry and I hope, I am not bothering you but I have one last question:

Difference between DTS HD MA and Dolby True HD.

I know the basic differences CBR vs. VBR, 1,5 Mbit/s vs. 6 Mbit/s max. and I have compared PCM, DTS-HD MA and Dolby True HD on a Japanese Blu-Ray, who seems to enjoy to give the customer the choice of many differently encoded soundtracks. This means, same soundtrack on the same disk and I just switched around: No audible difference for me, but I did the test with headphones and not in a surround-system.
However, my impression is, that Dolby True HD with around 3 Mbit/s sounds better than DTS HD MA, in the sense of liveliness. DTS HD MA sounds a bit less dynamic and the highs sound more dynamic with Dolby True HD. Despite the fact that my impression - it is just one - is true or not, is there a difference in the codecs, which could lead to such an impression? Or are they similar in the output? What do you think?
Thank you again and this is my last question.
Edited by Ganymed4 - 1/27/13 at 1:36pm
post #24384 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

PS: DEQ should be always on for Audyssey XT32. Not for XT, there it is optional, says Chris from Audyssey.
AFAIK DEQ is optional regardless of whether you have XT or XT32, and has the exact same effect with both. Can you source that quote exactly?
post #24385 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Their answer is correct. So the question comes down to this: Does the AVP offer a basic Pro Logic mode? If so, THX may be added to it. If not, then there is no way to get Pro Logic operation, regardless of whether THX is on or off.

The PLII algorithm has various modes, the most common of which are Movie and Music. It also has a Pro Logic mode (like Movie mode but with mono surrounds rolled off at 7 kHz). Other than some Sony AVRs I'm not sure many products used it.

I think what was confusing was that they call it "Pro Logic" in some menus and in the manual in several places and they also have menus and references in the manual where they call out PLII (or PLIIx). I was thinking these were 2 separate modes. After reading your explanation and reading the manual again (and again) and looking at the GUI menus, I think they must be using it as a generic reference and simply calling it simply "Pro Logic". Also, they seem to use it when they want to describe it as Pro Logic without the Cinema mode. In the very back of the manual they also describe Pro Logic II mode but there is not description for Pro Logic.

So, it would appear to me that there is no "Pro Logic" mode - just Pro Logic II. Since the original Pro Logic mode is so old, I probably could have surmised this from the beginning but I hate to assume things and find out later I have been doing it all wrong.eek.gif

Thanks for the help. I will now add this mode to my alphabet of 2 channel modes.smile.gif
post #24386 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

Difference between DTS HD MA and Dolby True HD.

However, my impression is, that Dolby True HD with around 3 Mbit/s sounds better than DTS HD MA, in the sense of liveliness. DTS HD MA sounds a bit less dynamic and the highs sound more dynamic with Dolby True HD. Despite the fact that my impression - it is just one - is true or not, is there a difference in the codecs, which could lead to such an impression? Or are they similar in the output? What do you think?
The codecs are rather different internally, and in the DSP resources needed, but they both output the same PCM samples, so there is no reason they should sound any different. There are two possible exceptions: Overall volume differences due to dialog normalization, and if the source was 7.1, how the rear channels are mixed into the 5.1 is subject to producer downmix parameter choices. If such are not in play, I cannot think of any way to explain a subjective difference.
post #24387 of 25955
Thank you very much Roger. Then it is just my impression, wishful thinking...
post #24388 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundofMind View Post

AFAIK DEQ is optional regardless of whether you have XT or XT32, and has the exact same effect with both. Can you source that quote exactly?

Let me see, if I can find it in Ask Audyssey.

Sorry, I can't publish the link here due to privacy reasons.

The whole Answer from Chris was:

"Hi Markus,

First: please make sure you have the latest firmware from Onkyo for the PR-SC5509. We were informed that there were some problems with the original firmware that were affecting the Audyssey performance. These were corrected by Onkyo in a later release.

Regarding the levels: It's possible that the 5507 and 5509 have different internal gains and so MultEQ is setting different levels. There is NO reason for the levels to be near 0 dB. Levels are set to achieve two goals: (1) to make all speakers play at the same level as each other and (2) to make the system play at film reference when you set the master volume control to 0 dB. So, depending on the sensitivity of each speaker and the listening distance, the levels will most often be in the negative range. Many people don't understand that these are simply relative numbers to achieve goals (1) and (2). There is no lack of punch or anything like that. If you want to listen louder, simply turn up the volume control. It is *identical* to turning up the levels in each speaker.

Dynamic EQ is absolutely necessary if you listen at any volume level below reference (0 dB). It must always be on to make sure the balance is maintained at lower listening levels.

Don't worry about the subwoofer dynamic range. It doesn't matter where the level on the sub is set. It's just a relative setting."

The essential sentence from Chris Kyriakakis is:

"Dynamic EQ is absolutely necessary if you listen at any volume level below reference (0 dB). It must always be on to make sure the balance is maintained at lower listening levels."

We were talking about XT32 as Onkyo implementation. I experienced this completely different for XT. There it was thickening the bass in a way, I didn't like. However, as I learned from Chris, for XT32 it should be always on. I had big problems with the XT32 implementation in the Onkyo first, however, Onkyo also sent out a firmware update which changed the DSPs. After that, I was happy with the Onkyo and also leave it on for the AVP. The Denon implementation of Audyssey is much better than the Onkyo one - is at least my impression.

Listening to the sound of 'Dredd' in 9.2 with the AVP was just exactly what I always wanted to hear. I hope this answers your question. In doubt, please use Ask Audyssey.

But at the end, you are right, it is absolutely optional. However, I found it most helpful, if you are using XT32. For XT, I would find it too much. Or in other words: There is a difference in the implementation of DEQ in XT and XT32.
Edited by Ganymed4 - 1/27/13 at 5:53pm
post #24389 of 25955
May be, it could be helpful, if I tell you the full story, of what I went through. I will make it short.

My experience goes from Onkyo PR-SC5507 to 5509 and the change of Audyssey XT to XT32 with it. Finally to the Denon AVP, which solved all my problems. Thank you Denon.

Well it started with 'comb filter' effects on the 5507 using Audyssey XT. This was the reason, why I bought the 5509. The direct comparison between the 5507 and the 5509 equipped with Audyssey XT32 and Sub-EQ HT led me to turning down the levels of my subwoofers to about 9 o'clock from 12 o'clock, to reach 75 dB level. This puzzled me. Same room, same chain, just change the pre-amp and had to turn down the levels dramatically. Nearly no bass, subwoofers were set too low, in my opinion. Could correct with DEQ but something was not right.
Then big firmware update by Onkyo during March 2012. Big changes. They changed the DSPs, a very long update but improved the sound and added Pro capability.
Bought Pro-Kit to make a Pro measurement. Everything was better.
Then changed to AVP. Made the Audyssey XT setup and - wonder, wonder - my subwoofers were back to 12 o'clock. Upgraded AVP and made the XT32 Pro measurement and my subwoofers stayed at 11 to 12 o'clock. Also, due to not having Sub-EQ HT, for each measurement position, the subwoofers were measured separately and not together. Sub-EQ HT measures the subwoofers only at the first position separately and each consecutive position together.
OK, this is my story about Audyssey Odyssey and the changes in the Audyssey implementation. What I didn't ask Chris up to now, is why the subwoofer levels are so different, with the same implementation of Audyssey? Internal levels, as he wrote, I guess.
However, the AVP is for me the best AV pre-amp, I ever had my hands on.
post #24390 of 25955
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

However, I found it most helpful, if you are using XT32. For XT, I would find it too much. Or in other words: There is a difference in the implementation of DEQ in XT and XT32.

A lot of people had issues with XT. And with respect to the DEQ/RLO implementation on the AVP, it is done a little differently after the XT32 upgrade. I never used DEQ or even knew about the RLO until JDSMOOTHIE set me straight on this thread (thanks JD) - there was a good bit of discussion about this back in July/August 2012 - See posts discussing DEQ and RLO on the AVP starting with this post here.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Official Denon AVP-A1HD/AVP-A1HDCI and POA-A1HD/POA-A1HDCI owners thread.