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LG BH200: Hidden Hacking Options - Page 10

post #271 of 332
FF on Byte 4 doesn't do anything. Maybe try some of the other Bytes if you're not too worried about messing things up?
post #272 of 332
1st of all does region free blu ray even exist ? if no than its a waist of time checking out different codes on your player.
post #273 of 332
Yes region free blu-rays do exist as do region locked.
post #274 of 332
Thread Starter 
I think Champer means "Hardware" BD Region Free. I am not aware of anything, except maybe Windows/Linux/Mac software.
post #275 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

I think Champer means "Hardware" BD Region Free. I am not aware of anything, except maybe Windows/Linux/Mac software.

if software region free blu ray exists what letter do they use for region free blu rays ?
post #276 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

if software region free blu ray exists what letter do they use for region free blu rays ?

Region Free Blu-Rays are marked ABC.
post #277 of 332
Thread Starter 
To be precise Region Free means:

DVD: Region 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
BD: Region A + B + C

Technically there's no such thing as Region Free, it's just the device happens to allow all of them. The Windows software in question is AnyDVD.
post #278 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

To be precise Region Free means:

DVD: Region 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
BD: Region A + B + C

Technically there's no such thing as Region Free, it's just the device happens to allow all of them. The Windows software in question is AnyDVD.

region free does exist for software there are some dvds that have 0 on the back but they are verry rare. what i dont get is what picture format they use ? ntsc or pal on the region 0 dvds
post #279 of 332
DVD region and PAL/NTSC are independent. For example, there are plenty of Region 4 DVDs in both PAL (Australasia) and NTSC (South America) versions. In the same way, a Region 0 DVD will be PAL or NTSC depending on how/where it's authored.
post #280 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

DVD region and PAL/NTSC are independent. For example, there are plenty of Region 4 DVDs in both PAL (Australasia) and NTSC (South America) versions. In the same way, a Region 0 DVD will be PAL or NTSC depending on how/where it's authored.

i thought only usa and canada use ntsc
post #281 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

i thought only usa and canada use ntsc

Japan is another.
post #282 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by narcopolo View Post

Japan is another.

since japan does so good developing electronics i though they would use pal since its better than ntsc
post #283 of 332
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

region free does exist for software there are some dvds that have 0 on the back but they are verry rare.

Region Free on Software, Hardware or Disc isn't Region Free it's Regions 1-6. It's only known as Region Free. AnyDVD for example lists Region Free discs as Regions 1-6. There is technically no such thing as Region 0, it's Region 1-6. It's slightly a moot point as we all know it as Region 0 or Region Free anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

what i dont get is what picture format they use ? ntsc or pal on the region 0 dvds

It depends on the country, whatever it uses. PAL/NTSC and Region status aren't connected.

Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

i thought only usa and canada use ntsc

Nope. More countries in fact use NTSC rather than PAL. Most of Asia (including India) is NTSC. Some Asian countries use both, Thailand Hong Kong being examples. Thai DVDs could just as easily be PAL as NTSC (often if they're ports from other countries), all HK DVDs are NTSC but broadcast TV is PAL.

As I'm sure you know Europe, Australia and New Zealand are solely PAL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

since japan does so good developing electronics i though they would use pal since its better than ntsc

Neither are better than the other . PAL has a higher line resolution but it also runs 4% faster (25fps instead of 29.97fps) meaning the audio pitch is off. I cannot notice it but many can. If I had to pick I'd go with PAL (for it's increased line resolution) but then I cannot notice PALs issues.

Film runs at 30fps which means NTSC doesn't suffer from this problem. Film being how it's projected in cinemas world-wide and also stored natively. It's converted to NTSC or PAL for the home markets. There's also SECAM which I think France (and a few others) uses for broadcast TV but French DVDs are also PAL. From what I can gather it's technically very similar to PAL.
post #284 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

Region Free on Software, Hardware or Disc isn't Region Free it's Regions 1-6. It's only known as Region Free. AnyDVD for example lists Region Free discs as Regions 1-6. There is technically no such thing as Region 0, it's Region 1-6. It's slightly a moot point as we all know it as Region 0 or Region Free anyway.


.

i went to a science museum not to long ago and the dvds they had for sale in there had region 0 on the back of them. so that makes those movies region free

i know if i go to bestbuy or walmart every dvd there is gonna be region 1 of course. i also have a dvd that has region 23456 on the back of it and its a pal dvd. thats why i thought only region 1 discs where ntsc cause that dvd i have region compatibale with anywhere else in the world besides here and it uses pal as its picture format
post #285 of 332
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

i went to a science museum not to long ago and the dvds they had for sale in there had region 0 on the back of them. so that makes those movies region free

Of course, they're not going to say Region 1+2+3+4+5+6 when they known All Regions is known as Region 0 . It doesn't mean technically there is a Region 0 standard. Technically Region Free is also wrong, it just means the disc is compatible with all regions.

I've seen cases with R0 on the back too. Put a Region 0 disc into a DVD-ROM drive and fire up something like AnyDVD and I think DVD Decrypter, it will in fact say Region 1+2+3+4+5+6, which covers all the world-wide regions anyway, hence Region 0.

Technically Region 0 would have to also include Region 7 (Reserved) and 8 (Airlines/Military) but those aren't commercial and no commercial DVD Player can read them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by champer View Post

i also have a dvd that has region 23456 on the back of it and its a pal dvd.

I have one of those too. It's likely to be down to licensing why R1 isn't included too.

All DVD-Audio discs are Region 0 and NTSC, simply because they re-use the same discs world-wide and NTSC is therefore needed.
post #286 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

Film runs at 30fps which means NTSC doesn't suffer from this problem. Film being how it's projected in cinemas world-wide and also stored natively. It's converted to NTSC or PAL for the home markets. There's also SECAM which I think France (and a few others) uses for broadcast TV but French DVDs are also PAL. From what I can gather it's technically very similar to PAL.

Not quite. Film is 23.97 fps (essentially 24fps). Hence the 1080p24 settings for film content.

PAL is deemed "close enough" that no conversion happens. Instead, it's just sped up. 24fps content is played at 25fps...which can lead to pitch issues as mentioned earlier.

For NTSC, a 2:3 pulldown telecine process is performed to convert the 24fps (progressive) content to 30fps (interlaced). Progressive displays/players can convert that back to a 24fps progressive image by performing reverse telecine...to varying degrees of success.

Anyway, for more, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine
post #287 of 332
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilblue View Post

Not quite. Film is 23.97 fps (essentially 24fps)

Of course it is. I knew that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oilblue View Post

PAL is deemed "close enough" that no conversion happens. Instead, it's just sped up. 24fps content is played at 25fps...which can lead to pitch issues as mentioned earlier.

For NTSC, a 2:3 pulldown telecine process is performed to convert the 24fps (progressive) content to 30fps (interlaced). Progressive displays/players can convert that back to a 24fps progressive image by performing reverse telecine...to varying degrees of success.

Thanks Oilblue. I was hazy about it. Are you saying all NTSC DVDs are stored in an Interlaced manner?

Except for the PAL speed-up wouldn't it mean PAL is better quality as it's played back without having to be converted first? That's without the fact PAL has a higher line resolution.
post #288 of 332
i googled it and says NTSC uses a Frame consisting of 486 horizontal lines in the Active Area and a Framerate of 29.97fps. The frame is interlaced, meaning it's composed of two individual fields (pictures) with a Fieldrate of 59.94fps.

and pal having 576 lines in the Active Area of the Frame. The Framerate, however, is slightly lower at 25fps.
post #289 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by oilblue View Post

Not quite. Film is 23.97 fps (essentially 24fps). Hence the 1080p24 settings for film content.

Close Film on film is actually exactly 24fps, but for NTSC DVD it's slowed down to 23.976 fps to better match up with the NTSC framerate of 59.94 interlaced fields per second.
post #290 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

Thanks Oilblue. I was hazy about it. Are you saying all NTSC DVDs are stored in an Interlaced manner?

Except for the PAL speed-up wouldn't it mean PAL is better quality as it's played back without having to be converted first? That's without the fact PAL has a higher line resolution.

Actually, nowadays most NTSC DVDs are stored at 23.976 progressive frames, ie non-interlaced, with flags instructing the DVD player how to deal with them (ie split frame into fields, repeat Field A 3 times then repeat Field B 2 times).

And yes, many people find that PAL is better at reproducing film as the 4% speedup is more seamless than the motion judder introduced by the 3:2 pulldown that NTSC needs. Other people notice the speedup and the pitch shift more.
post #291 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

Are you saying all NTSC DVDs are stored in an Interlaced manner?

No, as petercat clarified above (thanks peterjcat, and thanks for correcting my 24fps error ).

Here's a bit more, from the wikipedia article I referenced above: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine#DVDs
Quote:


On DVDs, telecined material may be either hard telecined, or soft telecined. In the hard-telecined case, video is stored on the DVD at the playback framerate (29.97 frame/s for NTSC, 25 frame/s for PAL), using the telecined frames as shown above. In the soft-telecined case, the material is stored on the DVD at the film rate (24 or 23.976 frame/s) in the original progressive format, with special flags inserted into the MPEG-2 video stream that instruct the DVD player to repeat certain fields so as to accomplish the required pulldown during playback.[8] Progressive scan DVD players additionally offer output at 480p by using these flags to duplicate frames rather than fields.

NTSC DVDs are often soft telecined, although lower-quality hard-telecined DVDs exist. In the case of PAL DVDs using 2:2 pulldown, the difference between soft and hard telecine vanishes, and the two may be regarded as equal. In the case of PAL DVDs using 2:3 pulldown, either soft or hard telecining may be applied.

Apart from playback reasons, one benefit for going with progressive (plus flags) on NTSC discs is that video at the same quality takes less space (there's simply fewer frames to encode). That either allows for more extras/features, or a bump up in the quality of the encode.
post #292 of 332
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

Actually, nowadays most NTSC DVDs are stored at 23.976 progressive frames, ie non-interlaced, with flags instructing the DVD player how to deal with them (ie split frame into fields, repeat Field A 3 times then repeat Field B 2 times).

Cheers. I thought most DVDs were Progressive nowadays, hence the question. Annoyingly many Asian countries still produce shoddy interlaced discs as routine though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

And yes, many people find that PAL is better at reproducing film as the 4% speedup is more seamless than the motion judder introduced by the 3:2 pulldown that NTSC needs.

I'm pleased I cannot notice either. I do notice PALs increased line resolution though.

I thought it was closer to 550 lines vs. 625 lines but maybe it differs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

Other people notice the speedup and the pitch shift more.

They certainly do, some people are very vocal about it.

Peter Jackson actually corrected the pitch on the PAL Lord of the Rings films but sadly (at least on the Australian discs) it introduced pops to the sound. I doubt I'd notice them but there are reviews out there mentioning it.
post #293 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by bradavon View Post

I thought it was closer to 550 lines vs. 625 lines but maybe it differs.

It's 525 vs 625 scan lines, not all of which are visible. Actual vertical resolution on DVDs is almost always 480 for NTSC and 576 for PAL, though sometimes there are a few blank lines for whatever reason.

Anyway, once we've all got TVs that can display at a multiple of 24hz and only play BDs and HD DVDs through our BH200s we'll all be happy
post #294 of 332
Re: the LG BH200 and PAL. Either it does the conversion or my display accepts PAL because I played one of the extras on disc 2 of La Mome and the motion was very jerky...

Ooops... I pressed the resolution button. Things are all messed up now.
I will need to connect my BH200 to a CRT.

Sigh...

Nope, ejecting the disc fixed everything... No more PAL crap. I'm changing it back to NTSC.
post #295 of 332
Quote:
Originally Posted by dring View Post

(snip)

MODEL: SMB_PLAYER_CANADA
Country: CA
Option Code: 43 41 00 01 00 05 00 40
Initial Language: English
TVSystem: NTSC
BDRE: Enabled
BD: Enabled
BD9: Enabled
HDDVD: Enabled
3xDVD: Enabled
Screen Saver: 5
Show Mode: OFF
Admin Mode: OFF
Auto Power Off: ON

(snip)
I would guess that the above list of parameters are all encoded in the EEPROM string. That one labeled "BDRE" looks interesting; might it stand for something like "Blu-ray Disc Region Enforcement"?

Sorry to bump this old thread. I just want to correct something.

BDRE is the equivalent of DVD+-RW for Blu-Ray.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blu-ray...isc_recordable

Quote:
Blu-ray Disc recordable refers to two optical disc formats that can be recorded with an optical disc recorder. BD-R discs can be written to once, whereas BD-RE can be erased and re-recorded multiple times. The theoretical maximum speed for Blu-ray Discs is about 12× as the speed of rotation (10,000 rpm) causes too much wobble for the discs to be read properly, similar to the 20× and 52× respective maximum speeds of DVDs and CDs.
post #296 of 332
Thanks allargon; we did work that out a couple of posts after the one you quoted. Still no real clues on making the BH200 BD region-free.
post #297 of 332
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by allargon View Post

Ooops... I pressed the resolution button. Things are all messed up now.
I will need to connect my BH200 to a CRT.

I've done that. The resolution button is completely pointless. If you press it a few more times it will re-cycle through the options and put you back to a working one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by allargon View Post

Nope, ejecting the disc fixed everything... No more PAL crap. I'm changing it back to NTSC.

You'll probably have to, it sounds like your TV doesn't support PAL.

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterjcat View Post

Still no real clues on making the BH200 BD region-free.

Personally I don't think it's possible. If BD Region coding was used like DVD region coding (on all releases) I'd consider it much more of an issue but when it's only used by a handful of studios I don't think it's a big deal.

Most of my BDs will work fine no matter what the region of the player. When I want to watch a Fox BD I set it to RA (I'm sticking with RA for Fox) and when I want to watch an Optimum BD I set it to RB.

Optimum Releasing UK have announced their forthcoming BDs will be RB. They have contradicted themselves since a little by announcing the odd title as Region Free (The Orphanage, RA in America by New Line) and some as RA+RB (the Studio Canal HD-DVD re-releases such as Terminator 2 and The Fog).

My Blueberry Nights for example is RB though.
post #298 of 332
Well I finally got around to applying the SD DVD Multi-region hack now I can go ahead and order that Japanese Grindhouse box set.
post #299 of 332
Just to be clear about some discussion above, all DVDs whether PAL, SECAM or NTSC store interlaced video on the disc - never progressive.

Progressive video may be recovered by the decoder using flag reading or blind cadence detection, but it's interlaced on the disc.

No Exceptions.

BR, Nick
post #300 of 332
I am working through the upgrades and cannot find instructions for the file that makes the BH200 region free for SD. I have the file copied to a disc and it is the right size. Do I just run it in the BH200 tray or are there special instructions?

Thanks
Peter
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