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Can you glue commercial screen material to a curved form?  

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm considering making a horizontal curve screen as Y-der4me did in a recent post. I wondered though, to get the full advantages of the curve, why not use a higher gain.

If a Stewart 2.0 or Draper M2500 material could be glued onto the plastic laminate it would give the curved screen higher output. Several members use M2500 on a flat screen, and it got good reviews from those members. The obvious drawbacks of higher gain; lack of uniformity and hotspots, could be lessened by using a curve.

Question # 1 - is there a way to safely glue such material, or will it bleed through to the viewing surface of the screen and alter the reflective properties?

Granted it isn't torus, but it would provide probably 1/4-1/3 the corrective benefits at way less money. A 12x5' sheet is only $50, and screen material is sold "raw" fairly cheaply.

OTOH - if KBK could come up with a 2-3 gain Screen Goo paint, that would be even better if it would stick to the laminate...either the finished side, or the back.
post #2 of 10
Jeff,

It is certainly possible to glue commercial screen material to a curved form. They do with curved acrylic rear-projection screens at Stewart, so it is definitely possible. If you get the right glue it will have not effect on the optical properties of the screen (if it works on transmissive rear-projection material is will work just as well on front-projection material). I don't know what kind of glue you would use, but I imagine it would be something that won't react with the vinyl screen material.

The only concern I would have would be that you would be tensioning the screen to get it to conform smoothly to the curved form and if you don't have a good bond between screen and surface it may start to pull away over time. You probably don't want anything too smooth as your substrace, or you may want to rough it up slightly with a fine grit sandpaper (clean well afterwards). You might investigate some high strength adhesives that are fairly unreactive (I'm sure 3M would have something suitable). You could also ask someone at Stewart what they use to glue their screens.

Regards,

Kam Fung
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
All instalation cautions are ones I have thought of. I would glue to the back of laminate counter top material...its made to be glued. Yes, care must be taken to apply smoothly. I think it can be done.
post #4 of 10
Only thing is, you'd better always keep the screen at that curve. If you try to roll it or straighten it, the border'll get delaminated or wrinkled.
post #5 of 10
jeez, I just looked back at my post, someone needs to spellcheck their work before handing it in. :D

Anyways, good luck! Let us know how it turns out.

You might also try looking up Iceman, at one point he was making an application to help determine screen curvatures.

Regards,

Kam Fung
post #6 of 10
Guys,

Someone mentioned my name? OK, I admit to having been holding out on you. A couple of months back, I wrote a small app for PJ-screen-viewer ray-tracing. With it, I have been able to produce some very interesting results and I have actually prepared some nice pics and data for a special post on the subject. I hope to get it all together soon.

A circular (1D curve) or spherical (2D curve) shape with radius of curvature equal to PJ-screen distance is a very good starting point. However, depending on the subtended angle, this rather deep curvature may lead to focusing problems on some projectors (you can easily determine your PJ's depth of focus beforehand). Tilting the screen back to have its axis pointing midway between PJ and viewer (vertically) is a good "trick" to remember as well.
post #7 of 10
"Tilting the screen back to have its axis pointing midway between PJ and viewer (vertically) is a good "trick" to remember as well"

That is true. Another trick is to lower the PJ a little and position the height of the screen center midway between PJ and viewing height. Then the screen can be kept perpendicular to the floor and the vertical curve is approximately circular.

Jeff. If gluing, make sure the screen material has an opaque backing. Otherwise you will likely see the adhesive through the screen.

Mike
post #8 of 10
Get Spray Mount at a artist store. This glue allows you to reposition the material and should not seep through.

Be very sure the end product is super smooth with no variations as they will show up as light and dark areas with the higher gain materials.

Deron
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Another trick is to lower the PJ a little and position the height of the screen center midway between PJ and viewing height. Then the screen can be kept perpendicular to the floor and the vertical curve is approximately circular.
Mike2,
You are right. However, this may take a toll on my head when I stand up after the flick :D. For anyone interested, the vertical curvature should really be elliptical as there are two focal points (PJ and viewer). In practice, the difference from a circular curvature is so small (the radii are the same to within a couple of inches) that there is no way for even the most critical viewer to notice it.
post #10 of 10
Iceman, try this.

Height of projector = height of Iceman + x, where x is any real number greater than 0.:)

Mike
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