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Doug's "No Name" Theater/Gaming Room - Page 2

post #31 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audixium View Post

Please keep posting pics of your cabinet build...

Right now I am in the middle of mudding and have 2 more coats to go.

At the same time, I am trying to settle on colors. I like the tan theme as well as the red/black theme, and still have yet to decide. What makes it difficult is that I have green carpert (was installed many years ago before I found this site!).

As for the cabinets, I have the left "sump pump" facing done. Here is a pic:


I plan on having all of the cabinetry (minus the columns) cut and dryfitted this weekend. This will allow them to be stained in a seperate room or garage.
post #32 of 366
Thanks for the pic - keep 'em coming!

The extent of my woodworking includes home repairs and building a nice work bench for the garage - so I'm a novice. But I picked up this trim and millwork book a while back. It shows the same method for building columns that you are using for the cabinets. Is this a fairly standard build method, or did you by chance happen to get the plan from a trim carpentry book sold at HD?
post #33 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audixium View Post

Thanks for the pic - keep 'em coming!

The extent of my woodworking includes home repairs and building a nice work bench for the garage - so I'm a novice. But I picked up this trim and millwork book a while back. It shows the same method for building columns that you are using for the cabinets. Is this a fairly standard build method, or did you by chance happen to get the plan from a trim carpentry book sold at HD?

I too am a novice when it comes to wood working. Last year, I put in about 1000 sq ft of 3/4" oak tongue/groove hard wood flooring, remodeled a 1/2 bath including reworking some plumbing all of which I have never done before. I pick up tips on the internet, tv shows, books, etc.. and simply by trial and error. I also purchased a trim book and am using very basic methods to build these cabinets.

The materials are 3/4" oak plywood that are biscuit joined. The inner trim is from some moulding I found at that sits flush at 3/4" and I like the profile too. This trim is only glued. I was not able to secure it via brad nails as the angle was too severe. The center part is simply a 1/4" oak panel that is stapled to the back.

If there are any tips I could give its to be patient and if you are doing something for the first time, try it out on a scrap piece of wood! That is how I knew the Brad's wouldnt work to secure my inner moulding...the wood split pretty bad. Glad I didnt "learn" that on my actual panel.

I also picked up a few tips from 'Ronnie's Home Theater Construction Begins' Thread
post #34 of 366
Thread Starter 
I received lot of samples for speaker cloth and got around to comparing them recently.

In comparison of my samples from Fabric Mate, Dazian, Speaker Works and Parts Express. The PE material is very .... purple looking, not so "black".
s
The Fabric Mate material, while very cool look and feel, does not seem to be the best fit for my application. I want something more traditional.

Dazian Celtic Cloth, is very black. But it appears very solid compared to the Speaker Works material. As if it would affect acoustics somewhat. I put the cloth to my mouth and blew...lots of resistance.

The Speaker Works material matches in black with others except for PE (as this is..purple looking) and is not as transparent as the PE material but definetely appears to be ready to use for speaker cloth.

SpeakerWorks.com doesnt really get much focus around this forum, Its about 12.00 sq yd (67" wide by 36"), a little expensive, but sure looks nice.

Does anyone have any experience with SpeakerWorks?
post #35 of 366
I'll be curious to hear what you decide on. I'm just about to the point where I need to build some columns on the stage to hide my front channels. I'm just now starting to look for some AT fabric that will do the job.

Thanks for the tip on the parts express fabric. I'll scratch that one from the list.
post #36 of 366
Doug - For what it is worth, I put in GOM for my speaker grills and acoustical treatments and it worked out great. Not sure if you looked at it, but you can get samples from Frabricmate...
post #37 of 366
Thread Starter 
I havent posted in awhile, but I have been busy with mudding and sanding. That is finally done!

Now I am staining and finishing. This is what I have to do:
  • AV Rack (carcass and 8 shelves) - Done
  • Soffit Panels (in Progress)
  • Cabinet Panels for front wall (on deck)
  • Cabinet lids for front wall (on the bench for now)
Stain-Minwax Rosewood
Finish-Minwax Poly Satin finish

Here are some shots of the carcass and one of the shelves.


post #38 of 366
Thread Starter 
After much consideration, I have scraped the "columns" on the front wall. I am going to go with the all to often seen, but looks so cool, Black FR701 GOM panels on the front wall.

The colors of the walls will be Applesauce.
The colors of the ceiling will be Oswego Tea (I had Knights Armour, but it was too dark and too gray for what I wanted). My wife talked me into this color, I wish I had stuck to the combo I liked as it would have saved me $40.00!
All the paint will be from Pittsburgh Paints Ultimate Color Collection - Grand Distinction.

Anyone need some Knights Armour? I have 2 gallons.

My existing carpet is somewhat green/gray burber.

Here are all the colors together....how does this look?



Here is a shot showing the Knights Armour (too dark and too gray)
Sorry for the shot lighting differences...I was running out of battery and wanted to get this shot in.
post #39 of 366
I think the Oswego Tea will look better in the long run, and the scheme is great.

Keep the pics coming!
post #40 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audixium View Post

I think the Oswego Tea will look better in the long run, and the scheme is great.

Keep the pics coming!

Thanks for chiming in! Someone is watching

I know you have been waiting to see those cabinet panels. I will be staining those soon and will post some pics.

I am at a point when I am thinking whether or not I chose the right colors, the right wood design, the right projector, etc....and wondering if I should have gone simpler in my design... I just hope it all comes together nicely.
post #41 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by djlemo View Post

Doug - For what it is worth, I put in GOM for my speaker grills and acoustical treatments and it worked out great. Not sure if you looked at it, but you can get samples from Frabricmate...

Well, I received my sample of Black FR701 GOM from Fabricmate and I like it....and bought it. I decided that I will use more of it to cover my front wall with panel frames covered in GOM surrounding my screen.
post #42 of 366
Thread Starter 
Well, these colors look right to me, but when I painted a small spot on my existing white ceiling, it looks so dark and bleak....I am not so sure I want to go this dark.

Just when I thought it was all down hill from here, I get setbacks like this. An eerie feeling in my stomach that its not going to turn out nice at all.

I had some problems with my first coat of stain on my soffit panels and that is not sitting to well with me right now.



post #43 of 366
I would definately take a day to look at the ceiling several times, possibly with the other paints up too. I wasn't sure initially when I did my ceiling, but found that I loved it the next day.

I really like your stain color btw.
post #44 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mn_hokie View Post

I would definately take a day to look at the ceiling several times, possibly with the other paints up too. I wasn't sure initially when I did my ceiling, but found that I loved it the next day.

I really like your stain color btw.

Thanks for the advice....here is a shot with wall color, ceiling color, and some of my stained/poly'ed wood.

I have to say, I love it! Its finally starting to come together.

NOTE: I took the soffit panels off to stain/finish those in the garage. I cant wait till I get those up with the crown molding!

post #45 of 366
Thread Starter 
Right now...I am staining!
Most of these boards are for the undersides of my soffit. Crown molding will go on the wall/soffit and some crown molding will go on the soffit face to hide rope lighting!
Anyone know a good online source with good prices for rope lighting? I am looking for a yellow/golden color.

What a mess!
Look at the soffit panels (far left)...for some unknown reason (beer had something to do with it)...I stained them differently and it turned out too dark. I had to sand them down and start all over. They finally took the stain correctly and matched everything else.


More mess:



But soon, it will be complete!
post #46 of 366
Thread Starter 
Soffit panels are finally stained/poly'd and installed.



post #47 of 366
Thread Starter 
An update:

I have the soffit panels and crown moulding complete except for a couple of returns. I also have the the trim around the a/v rack to do as well. The door and base trim will be a little bit later.

I am now going to focus on building my screen and GOM panels for my front wall.

I am so close, I can smell the popcorn.

post #48 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by kezug View Post


This shot just screams "put a CIH screen here"...
post #49 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audixium View Post

This shot just screams "put a CIH screen here"...

I know! But I just dont want to put forth the extra cost for a lens to get the CIH.
post #50 of 366
Looking very good. BTW, I feel your pain with the CIH screen. If it weren't for the anamorphic lens cost, I'd be doing the same thing.
post #51 of 366
Quote:
Originally Posted by kezug View Post

I know! But I just dont want to put forth the extra cost for a lens to get the CIH.

Yes...but have you checked out the Home Theater Brothers lens? It is $600 and everyone I've seen post about it is very happy. My neighbor (BlackBanshee) mounted one during his build process and really was impressed.

Perhaps in Kezug's Theater v2.0...
post #52 of 366
Thread Starter 
Well, I am done....for now. I am at a very presentable stage and had a birthday party for my son....after cake, ice cream, pinata, presents...we put on Transformers HD DVD. (from Netflix...son of a bitch skipped like a motha...only one that ever did that for me since 1.5 years of using Netflix and of all nights...)

Any ways, here is a quick shot...I will post more detailed ones soon.

post #53 of 366
very nice man
post #54 of 366
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for your comments (all 3 of you )...I guess I should have posted this in the "dedicated" theater thread as I thought I would get more traffic.

Anyway, there was some concern in other posts about putting speakers inside the front wall cabinet below my screen. Since I was on a budget, I decided to just use my existing speakers
http://www.polkaudio.com/images/home...ack/rm6200.jpg
until I could save for something more appropriate.

However, I am telling you this, those speakers in my setup sound really really good. In fact, so good, that people could not believe I didnt have something bigger! I dont know if its just the makeup of my room, but acoustically I did nothing special. Infact, an audiophile would write off my room as a total acoustical mess. But it sounds really good. Better than average for most people as a lot of people heard it over the weekend and all said the sound was awesome.

My biggest fear was that they would sound too small for the 100" screen, but they dont. I did move my sub a couple of times and I believed this helped as well.

So, I guess I am writing this for those who read about speaker setup here and then feel compelled to go over budget to get something better. If you can, then go for it. I konw I would have. But if you cant, then simply use your existing speakers, you may be suprised that they sound better than you think.
post #55 of 366
Congrats!

Good to hear your existing speakers worked out. I still am going to replace my HTIB speakers though. For movies they are fine. But just yesterday I was listening to music cranked and could totally tell they were anemic in mid range!

How many coats of stain did you do on each of the pieces?
post #56 of 366
Thread Starter 
I could see how a HTiB speakers suffer in the music range...even my RS6200 Polk Audio's lack the range...that is why I will be putting my Bose 301 bookshelf speakers into my cabinet as well and for music I will do the old A/B switch over to those speakers. If only i could A/B switch using the sub too, but the 301's alone produce a pretty decent sound for music.

As for the coats of stain....I put only 2 coats. I did some boards with 3 coats of stain and it was just too dark and brown. You couldnt see the grain of the wood. So I had to sand those boards and start over. I did 2 coats of stain and only 2 coats of poly.

I am putting together some final pics...hopefully loading them soon, but my camera is having a hard time with the dark ceiling and dark front wall with the big white screen...the colors are just not coming out right.
post #57 of 366
A friend of mine who is a pro photographer said a trick is to first "half push" the camera button while you are pointing at only the dark area in the viewfinder. Then once it does its little adjustment thing (while your finger is still halfway down), take the full picture.

The quote below I pulled from here and it's better at explaining than me (but it's not my friend's site).

Quote:

Auto Exposure

The camera manufacturers have come up with all sorts of ingenious metering systems to try to help, there are now multi mode metering systems, which give you a choice of centre weighting', 'spot metering' or multi spot metering' on many of the better cameras, but none can guarantee to give you what you want every time.

The temptation to think that your camera knows what it's doing' is great, even for more experienced photographers, which is my main complaint against automatic cameras. It's easy to get lulled into a false sense of security, switch your brain to more interesting things and end up with a pile of rubbish.

Tip - using auto exposure to your advantage.

If you have a modern camera, the chances are that the default metering system is centre weighted average', which means that, although it takes an average reading of the whole scene, it takes more notice of what is in the middle of the frame. Which is good news for us. The other good news is that it takes this reading at the time when you take first pressure' on the button to take your picture. When you push it halfway down and it beeps at you, not only is the focus now set (on an auto focus camera) but the exposure reading is taken and the aperture and shutter speed are set. So, if your main point of interest is not in the centre of the frame, it's a good idea to put it there temporarily while you focus and take your light reading, then move the camera whilst still holding the button halfway down and compose the picture the way you want it to be. A common use for this technique is when you are taking a close up shot of two people and there is space between their heads, if you're not careful the camera will focus on the wall or trees behind them. If the background is very dark or very light this can alter the exposure significantly and result in faces that are too dark or too light.

Skin tones are what most meters are set up to consider an average tone', they are also usually the part of the picture that we most want to get right. If I am photographing a group of people in difficult circumstances, like bright sunlight for instance, I will often move close in to the group and take a light reading from someone's face or, if we are all standing in the same type of light, I will take a reading from the back of my hand. This is no good, of course, if the subject is in bright sunlight and I am in the shade. Brown parcel paper is also an extraordinarily accurate surface to take a light reading from.
post #58 of 366
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audixium View Post

A friend of mine who is a pro photographer said a trick is to first "half push" the camera button while you are pointing at only the dark area in the viewfinder. Then once it does its little adjustment thing (while your finger is still halfway down), take the full picture.

The quote below I pulled from here and it's better at explaining than me (but it's not my friend's site).

Thanks, I will try this tonight!
post #59 of 366
Thread Starter 
Ok, here are some picks of my fabrication for the screen.

For the materials, I used BOC, and some very nice Velvet from Joann Fabric.
The frame was built using poplar 1x4 and 1x3's as well as pine casing.

I found this idea from someone on the SMX forum...I will have to find the link:
Edit: Here is the original link: http://www.smxscreen.com/forum/showt...ht=woody+frame
However, it appears to be down now that SMX has gone "commercial". But I did save the post in form of screen shots to a word document, so all you have to do is ask and I will send it to you. Be sure to send me an email address for me to send the attachment to.








I used the french cleat method to hang it...pretty simply actually.

post #60 of 366
Thread Starter 
Again, I have to say I am very pleased with how well my speakers sound...its as if I purchased new speakers...honest.

I built very little simple speaker stands and placed them towards the front of the cabinet...

Here is a shot of the open cabinet





Oh, and here is good old ugly fugly again, but now it doesnt look so bad. .In fact, people ask how/where I moved my sump pump.



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