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What is YOUR Reference CD or SACD?? - Page 9

post #241 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by CruelInventions View Post

That's my policy. If too many people are already familiar with the artist/album, it immediately goes into the dump pile. Too bourgeois, I cannot associate myself with cookie-cutter musical tastes. tongue.gif

LMAO. I get it, and I think that seems to be the prevailing view in that thread. I tend to post things I am actually listening to at the moment, whether it's bourgeois or not. I'm not trying to impress anyone with how obscure my tastes are (they aren't), like I think at least one poster does frequently (it's not Citizen Arcane). I just like good music, popular or not.
Quote:
For me, the only person who continually throws up unknown titles or artists in that "now listening" thread is citizen arcane. Perhaps his tastes don't often intersect with mine, but even so. At least by name, I think I'm pretty well acquainted with a wide range of artists both old and new, from many different genres. But about four out of every five of his posted titles leaves me with a blank stare of unrecognition. confused.gifbiggrin.gif

No doubt. He's got a huge collection of Kraut rock, among other things, and seems to be going through it one by one. Fine by me.

Meanwhile, from time to time I'll continue to post what I'm listening to, and I'll try not to post many Floyd, Stones, Beatles, The Who, The Animals, The Cure, The Clash, Tom Petty, Radiohead, or Steely Dan posts. Dammit, I'll listen to those staples when I feel like it, bourgeois, cookie-cutter or not. It's great music. I love it. Sue me. tongue.gifcool.gif
post #242 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will2007 View Post

LMAO. I get it, and I think that seems to be the prevailing view in that thread. I tend to post things I am actually listening to at the moment, whether it's bourgeois or not. I'm not trying to impress anyone with how obscure my tastes are (they aren't), like I think at least one poster does frequently (it's not Citizen Arcane). I just like good music, popular or not.
No doubt. He's got a huge collection of Kraut rock, among other things, and seems to be going through it one by one. Fine by me.

Meanwhile, from time to time I'll continue to post what I'm listening to, and I'll try not to post many Floyd, Stones, Beatles, The Who, The Animals, The Cure, The Clash, Tom Petty, Radiohead, or Steely Dan posts. Dammit, I'll listen to those staples when I feel like it, bourgeois, cookie-cutter or not. It's great music. I love it. Sue me. tongue.gifcool.gif

You forgot Led Zeppelin. I seem to remember getting reprimanded for that one.
post #243 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by postrokfan View Post

You forgot Led Zeppelin. I seem to remember getting reprimanded for that one.

wink.gif Guilty, and true.
post #244 of 318
I would note that IMHO the early issues of Iron Maiden on CD were, what's the technical term? Oh yes: crap. I have Poweslave, Number of the Beast and Live After Death from the 80s and they are so flat and poor as to be almost unlistenable. I suspect they were hastily mastered as if for tape in the early days of CDs. I have not dared try any "remastered" editions since.
post #245 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Galbavy View Post

I would note that IMHO the early issues of Iron Maiden on CD were, what's the technical term? Oh yes: crap. I have Poweslave, Number of the Beast and Live After Death from the 80s and they are so flat and poor as to be almost unlistenable. I suspect they were hastily mastered as if for tape in the early days of CDs. I have not dared try any "remastered" editions since.
The dynamic range database is always a good source for this sort of information: http://www.dr.loudness-war.info/index.php?search_artist=iron+maiden&sort=dr&order=desc

I would also use a player that supports album-based normalization (such as JRiver MC) as that removes the loudness advantage of highly compressed tracks.
post #246 of 318
I may of blurred the lines between favorite albums and reference albums and for this I apologize.

For sure some SACD / DVD-A selections such as DSOTM, Brothers in Arms, Beck-Sea of Change, Allison Krause (live) would be better choice as a 'reference' selection.

I still would argue though, that there is still nothing better than classic 80's heavy metal.
post #247 of 318
Pet Sounds - Beach Boys (MFSL SACD)
Beth Nielsen Chapman - Beth Nielsen Chapman (CD)
You Hold the Key - Beth Nielsen Chapman (CD)
Sand and Water - Beth Nielsen Chapman (CD)
Singles 1969-1981 - Carpenters (A&M SACD)
Lead Me On - Amy Grant (Original CD release, not the remastered EMI release that destroyed all ambience, grrr…)
Just A Little Lovin’ - Shelby Lynne (CD)
Fresh Aire II, III and V - Mannheim Steamroller (Original CDs, not the HDCD remasters)
The Complete Reprise Studio Recordings - Frank Sinatra & Count Basie (Frank Sinatra Collection 2011 Remaster CD)
Edited by kucharsk - 4/25/13 at 3:37am
post #248 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chronoptimist View Post

The dynamic range database is always a good source for this sort of information: http://www.dr.loudness-war.info/index.php?search_artist=iron+maiden&sort=dr&order=desc

I would also use a player that supports album-based normalization (such as JRiver MC) as that removes the loudness advantage of highly compressed tracks.

Nice site - never knew about that. But I wasn't referring to the DR of the CDs - I have many from that era that sounds much much better. They were just rushed out from the existing mixes/masters.
post #249 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Galbavy View Post

Nice site - never knew about that. But I wasn't referring to the DR of the CDs - I have many from that era that sounds much much better. They were just rushed out from the existing mixes/masters.
That's true - the dynamic range doesn't necessarily tell you how good or bad a master is. But a low dynamic range is often an indicator for something poorly mastered.
post #250 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjpearce023 View Post

Wow this is a great thread. I'm going to check out some of the suggestions. I have just recently gotten into jazz after getting some Paradigm studio 20s. The instruments sound so real and lifelike. Here are my favorite tracks to show off my system.

Sade - Greatest Hits Number 4 "Jezebel" is my personal favorite. If I ever want to demo a system or mess around with speaker placement I go to this CD.

Phil Collins - Face Value. Track 5 "droned" is all instrumental and I love cranking it up for guest. Always gets a wow from friends.

Quote:
Originally Posted by randbassociates View Post

Wow this is a great thread. I'm going to check out some of the suggestions. I have just recently gotten into jazz after getting some Paradigm studio 20s. The instruments sound so real and lifelike. Here are my favorite tracks to show off my system.
Sade - Greatest Hits Number 4 "Jezebel" is my personal favorite. If I ever want to demo a system or mess around with speaker placement I go to this CD.
Phil Collins - Face Value. Track 5 "droned" is all instrumental and I love cranking it up for guest. Always gets a wow from friends.

I was like wow those are my 2 favorites but then I realized you copied and pasted my post from 2010. Weird!
post #251 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjpearce023 View Post


I was like wow those are my 2 favorites but then I realized you copied and pasted my post from 2010. Weird!

I'd report the post and poster if I were you. "He" or it (could be a bot) has exactly one post. That it is a verbatim copy of your 2010 post is pretty good evidence that the poster is not a real human being. Report it.
post #252 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Will2007 View Post

I'd report the post and poster if I were you. "He" or it (could be a bot) has exactly one post. That it is a verbatim copy of your 2010 post is pretty good evidence that the poster is not a real human being. Report it.

I went ahead and reported it. Thanks.
post #253 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Galbavy View Post

I would note that IMHO the early issues of Iron Maiden on CD were, what's the technical term? Oh yes: crap. I have Poweslave, Number of the Beast and Live After Death from the 80s and they are so flat and poor as to be almost unlistenable. I suspect they were hastily mastered as if for tape in the early days of CDs. I have not dared try any "remastered" editions since.

As explained to me...

In the early 1980's, at the beginning of CD's, many (most) recording studios were using 6" monitors which emulated your typical car speaker (of the day). Most music was being listened to in the car while cruising and...eek.gif Engineers had been making the sound "right" to be heard from radio, cassette and 8 track tapes on car stereos. It wasn't until people, building home stereo systems (to replace the ol' "console"), and added the new CD player, that it was realized how bad the resolution and dynamics of the medium was on CD when played back on "real" speakers. It was said that, "CD's would never replace LP's!"

The studio monitors were seriously up-graded, the sampling rates went up and a decent CD was then produced, which was a serious contender to the LP! It's funny that 30 years later, the quality of CD is dropping again because "people" seem to be happy listening to MP3's (why spend money to put quality into a CD?), so LP's are making a come back! (not that they ever left) Another reason to beat your children.biggrin.gif

My kids would rather listen to MP3's on headphones from their computers or I-pods than to my McIntosh system, because of convenience. My son HAS admitted that the Mac does sound better so has started to use FLAC's...on his I-pod and headphones instead of ear buds. Sigh. But he has bought one LP...of game sound tracks.frown.gif
Edited by just jim - 5/3/13 at 6:39pm
post #254 of 318
For music:
Dave Brubeck - the song "Take Five" on vinyl, if you want an introduction to what Jazz can be!
Fresh Aire on the original "direct to disk" vinyl
Ian Kelly - "Speak Your Mind" album on CD
Buckingham/Nicks album on vinyl (there is a repressing)
Cowboy Junkies - "Studio" on CD
Jennifer Warren - "Famous Blue Raincoat" First heard this on the first pair of Ribbon Speakers that I had heard. In 1987 I couldn't afford the $40,000 speakers, or the mono blocks, but I bought the CD!
post #255 of 318
I have one reference CD, and one reference SACD: Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon.

Beyond it being a beautifully mastered and composed work of art it's hands down my favorite album of all time. The Wall comes a very close second.

But like the majority of people in this thread I agree with buying music you enjoy. Reference just means your baseline for how everything else should compare to what you expect.

I play everything from classic rock, to R&B, blues, jazz, rock, hip-hop & rap, metal and country. If I like it, it stays in my collection, if not I move it along.
post #256 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

As explained to me...

In the early 1980's, at the beginning of CD's, many (most) recording studios were using 6" monitors which emulated your typical car speaker (of the day). Most music was being listened to in the car while cruising and...eek.gif Engineers had been making the sound "right" to be heard from radio, cassette and 8 track tapes on car stereos. It wasn't until people, building home stereo systems (to replace the ol' "console"), and added the new CD player, that it was realized how bad the resolution and dynamics of the medium was on CD when played back on "real" speakers. It was said that, "CD's would never replace LP's!"

The studio monitors were seriously up-graded, the sampling rates went up and a decent CD was then produced, which was a serious contender to the LP! It's funny that 30 years later, the quality of CD is dropping again because "people" seem to be happy listening to MP3's (why spend money to put quality into a CD?), so LP's are making a come back! (not that they ever left) Another reason to beat your children.biggrin.gif

I remember my father saying basically the same thing in the '70's when cassettes replaced reel-to-reel. I still have the sore butt to prove it frown.gif .

My "reference" cd changes from time-to-time but it's been Al Stewarts Year Of The Cat for over a year now. Lots of different istruments played slow enough so you can hear them. I'm also very familiar with all the tracks which is also very important when comparing speakers/equipment. I've also used Steely Dan's Aja and Trick Of The Tail by Genesis among others.
post #257 of 318
This is my current list.
It keeps changing.
1.is not ''better'' than 3. or 5.
There is one new artist on from the small independent high end audiophile label Sound Liaison from Amsterdam,in audiophile terms this might be the "best".


1.Peter Erskine trio: As it Is, (ecm)

2.Frank Sinatra Only the Lonely(capitol)

3 Joni Mitchel Travelogue(amazon)

4.Pieter Wispelwey Bach cello suites (3rd recording)(amazon)

5.Carmen Gomes inc. Thousand Shades of Blue http://www.soundliaison.com/
post #258 of 318
I HIGHLY, HIGHLY recommend "Blue Mind" by Anne Bisson. THE BEST audiophile recording in a very long time.
post #259 of 318
Sorry I made a small mistake; the last one on my list,Sound Liaison's Carmen Gomes, is a 24/96 Wav download,not available as Cd or Sacd
post #260 of 318
yeah I like the Anne Bisson: "Blue Mind" too,it 's not in my top 5 but it's very well recorded.
post #261 of 318
It was The Wall 2011 re-master up until a week ago now it's Led Zeppelin Mothership 2007 CD. I use "Since I've been loving you" to be exact the drums in that hit hard and require a tad bit of power. "Hey You" was and still is reference song because the drums and the bass hit very hard so hard in fact that I blew my tweeter on one of my speakers eek.gif .

The reason why I use these songs is because it tortures amplifers and is a good way to tell if speakers distort at high wattage.
post #262 of 318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suite View Post

This is my current list.
It keeps changing.
1.is not ''better'' than 3. or 5.
There is one new artist on from the small independent high end audiophile label Sound Liaison from Amsterdam,in audiophile terms this might be the "best".


1.Peter Erskine trio: As it Is, (ecm)

2.Frank Sinatra Only the Lonely(capitol)

3 Joni Mitchel Travelogue(amazon)

4.Pieter Wispelwey Bach cello suites (3rd recording)(amazon)

5.Carmen Gomes inc. Thousand Shades of Blue http://www.soundliaison.com/

That is a very nice list!
I'm happy to see u included the Thousand Shades of Blue album from Carmen Gomes.

I find the Sound Liaison downloads to be at the absolute top of the new High Resolution download labels.
Did you read the Rad Bennett review on that album?
Quote:
I've been among the prophets saying that high-resolution downloads are the future of audiophile music sales. Surely it will benefit the majors to make high-quality downloads a first choice rather than an MP3 extra, but I believe that individual artists can benefit as well. Most new-to-the-scene performers have little money for middlemen and disc manufacture, yet can get things together for the Internet.

Frans de Rond and Peter Bjørnild have taken this approach with Sound Liaison, producing recordings available only in 24-bit/96kHz downloads that mirror the master recording. And man, are they ever sweet. I've seldom heard recordings that were so successful in both performance and sound aspects.

De Rond hails from the Netherlands, where he studied double bass at The Royal Conservatory in The Hague while concurrently studying recording techniques. Bjørnild also studied double bass, moving to the Netherlands to continue studies at The Hague. Since graduating, he has played almost every type of music, from classical to jazz. Together de Rond and Bjørnild bring two pairs of golden ears to their label. Bjørnild claims that, "a recording should be as realistic and beautiful sounding as possible. As if, when closing your eyes, you find yourself in the best seat in the hall."

The partners discovered a fine recording hall (Studio-Eleven, Hilversum) and set out to record amazing musicians in this great acoustic place in front of live audiences. It's a daring feat; one take and no place to hide, but the abilities of the musicians involved make it seem easy. I chose to talk about the first album by Carmen Gomes Inc. It was a tough choice because all of the three current albums were worthy of review.

Carmen Gomes has won many awards in the Netherlands and surrounding areas. Like so many new European singers, she sings in English -- excellent English, I might add. She's formed a group called Carmen Gomes Inc., with Folker Tettero on guitar, Peter Bjørnild on double bass, and Marcel van Engelen on drums. Her style is bluesy and intimate with a sexy voice that's sweet as dark tupelo honey, and her interpretations are unerring. The musicians play to her and to each other, and the ensemble is so tight that the four musicians breathe and move as one.

There are some standards on the set that knocked me over with their fresh approach. Any singer can misplace a few accents and rhythms and come up with something that's original, but perhaps also uneasy and a little strange. Not Gomes, who has taken the songs to their bones and then restructured them to suit her style. Thus "Fever" doesn't sound like a cover of Peggy Lee; it sounds like a brand new take on a familiar song. You emerge from hearing it not thinking it's better or lesser than Lee's version, but that it's a valid new interpretation that could have come first.

The same approach works on "Angel Eyes," "You Don't Know What Love Is," and "I'm on Fire." Most of the rest, including the title song, "Oblivion," "Time Will Tell," "Gasoa Blue," and "The Sea," are Gomes originals that fit right in with the standards. The recording achieves exactly what Bjørnild set out as his goal. It can provide the best seat in your listening room. Go to the Sound Liaison site, listen to a few samples, download an album, and see if you don't agree that this intimate effort is one of the best and best-sounding jazz vocal albums to come along in many a day. By the way, the small audience applauds enthusiastically enough after the last chords of a song die away, but the attendees never interrupt or make themselves known while a song is going on. No doubt they were completely mesmerized into silence, as was I.

Be sure to listen to: On "Dock of the Bay," Gomes creates a languid, bluesy version that is a little bit reminiscent of Bobbie Gentry while still coming across as quite original. It'll cast a spell over you.

. . . Rad Bennett
post #263 of 318
There's a few I use for trying out new gear, but as I'm pretty settled with the stereo, these are the tracks that have been retired from official demo testing duties(!) :-

Yes - Starship Trooper (track)
Genesis - A Trick of the Tail (album)
Joni Mitchell - NIght Ride Home (title track)
Louis Armstrong - What A Wonderful World (MCA, mastered by Greg Fulginiti, 1988 - amazing recording, great tracks)
Pink Floyd - Mother (track, from the original Harvest 2CD release)

...and a bunch of others. No remasters, and they all sound great.
post #264 of 318
The Who - Tommy (SACD or DVD Audio)
Pink Floyd - Dark side of the moon (Blu Ray)
Pixies - Doolittle (Blu Ray)
Radiohead - Kid A (vinyl)
post #265 of 318
London Symphony Orchestra playing Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet on SACD does it for me. Really good separation and dynamics. Brilliant sound staging. The orchestral bass drum has this lifelike tonality and extension to it. Absolutely awesome piece of music and ballet too!

Also, on the opposite end, Salmonella Dub's 'Inside the Dub Plates' is great for soundstaging and slam. A great powerful album especially if you want some slam and bass.

Kraftwerk's Minimum / Maximum is really good well recorded album.

Even if you don't like the music, if the certain passage or song benchmark's your system and shows what it can do, I think that is reason enough to use it. It's like buying a Ferrari and never going over 100km/h (60mp/h)
post #266 of 318
So many great selections here;

Jamie Cullum- twentysomething CD or SACD.
post #267 of 318
Dave Brubeck - "Take Five" on SACD
Steely Dan - "Aja" on SACD

Really, the former though - the sax sounds like it's just floating right in front of you on my 2-channel system.
post #268 of 318
Barenaked Ladies- Gordon
Raconteurs- Broken Boy Soldiers
Taj Mahal- Best of
Beck- Mutations
Michael Jackson- History CD1
Mumford and Sons- Sigh no more
Alice in Chains- Essential Alice in chains

So many others, mainstream I might add. wink.gif
post #269 of 318
Patricia Barber "Nightclub" SACD
Lyle Lovett "Joshua Judges Ruth"
Steely Dan "Gaucho" (which I have in something like 5 different formats *sigh*)
and then some individual songs, such as Eagle-Eye Cherry's "Desireless" and Fear's "We Destroy the Family"
post #270 of 318

The Nora Jones album "Come Away with Me" is available on SACD, is well recorded and sounds great to a wide variety of people.  I also like the Diana Krall CD's, most are available on SACD as well.

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