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EV's Recommended & Top Rated DTV Indoor UHF/VHF Set Top Antenna Review Round-Up Guide - Page 101

post #3001 of 3314
I'd go with the attic and a Channel Master CM4228. You could put a rotor on it, but you'd still get most or all of your green channels without it.

A DB4 would probably work fine, but the larger 4228 may get you some of those off-axis stations without a rotor (and channel 10), and the added gain would compensate for the longer coax run from the attic (and for just being in the attic - and the trees).
post #3002 of 3314
The 4228 would have only about half the beamwidth of the 4-bay making it MORE directional and LESS likely to pick up off-axis stations. It would do much better on the VHF, though.

Since channel 11 has a NM of around 45 dB, even a rock or stick should pick it up, so the DB4 would likely suffice.
post #3003 of 3314
First post so before I begin, thanks EscapeVelocity and all the AVS Forum regulars for the awesome resource. I live in a second floor apartment and I'm trying to decide on an indoor amplified antenna. I've searched AVS and other forums but I can't seem to find a definitive answer as to which of these two antennas is better: the RadioShack 15-1892 UFO or a Quantum FX ANT-102. I already have my Insignia NS-DXA1-APT hooked up to a Radio Shack 15-234 Bow-Tie Antenna and get good reception for "close" channels but some channels break-up then disappear.

I can get the bow-tie in the closest window (which faces East) without any problems but anything larger wouldn't fit and would have to be roughly 6' from it. I am surrounded by other apartment buildings, the closest window has a metal frame with metal surrounding the panes of glass (apt. was built in the '40s) and there is a large tree in front of the window that blocks a clear line of site. I've included both my TV Fool and AntennaWeb "reports" below:

TV Fool:
Code:
Callsign                Chan            Network Dist(mi)        Path    NM(dB)
 WXII-DT                31      (12.1)  NBC     20.6            LOS     61.5
 WUNL-TV                32              PBS     20.5            LOS     59.0
 WCWG-DT                19      (20.1)  CW      29.7            LOS     58.8
 WXLV-DT                29      (45.1)  ABC     29.7            LOS     58.5
 WFMY-DT                51      (2.1)   CBS     28.8            LOS     57.3
 WMYV                   33      (48.1)  MyN     29.7            LOS     56.5
 WGHP                   35      (8.1)   Fox     31.0            LOS     52.4
 WLXI-DT                43      (61.1)  Ind     29.7            LOS     48.5
 WGPX                   14      (16.1)  ION     36.5            1Edge   31.9
 WUNG-DT                44      (58.1)  PBS     53.8            LOS     31.0
 WCNC-DT                22      (36.1)  NBC     71.5            LOS     30.0
 WJZY-DT                47      (46.1)  CW      70.2            LOS     27.6
 WSOC-DT                34      (9.1)   ABC     62.5            1Edge   26.5
 WBTV                   23              CBS     71.3            1Edge   25.9
 WCCB-DT                27      (18.1)  Fox     62.3            1Edge   25.1
 WMYT-DT                39      (55.1)  MyN     70.2            LOS     22.7
 WAXN-TV                36              Ind     39.5            LOS     20.3
 WTVI-DT                11      (42.1)  PBS     60.2            LOS     14.9
 WUNC-TV                25      (4.1)   PBS     64.0            2Edge   14.8
 WAXN-DT                50      (64.1)  Ind     62.5            1Edge   14.7
AntennaWeb:
Code:
DTV             Antenna Call    Channel Network City,                   Compass Miles   RF
                Type    Sign                    State                   Heading From    Channel
*       yellow  uhf     WUNL-DT 26.1    PBS     CHAPEL HILL, NC         353°    20.5    32
*       yellow  uhf     WCWG-DT 20.1    CW      LEXINGTON, NC           128°    29.6    19
*       yellow  uhf     WFMY-DT 2.1     CBS     GREENSBORO, NC          129°    28.8    51
*       yellow  uhf     WXLV-DT 45.1    ABC     WINSTON-SALEM, NC       128°    29.6    29
*       yellow  uhf     WXII-DT 12.1    NBC     WINSTON-SALEM, NC       353°    20.5    31
*       green   uhf     WMYV-DT 48.1    MNT     GREENSBORO, NC          128°    29.6    33
*       green   uhf     WGHP-DT 8.1     FOX     HIGH POINT, NC          135°    31.0    35
*       red     uhf     WLXI-DT 43.1    TCT     GREENSBORO, NC          128°    29.6    43
*       blue    uhf     WCNC-DT 36.1    NBC     CHARLOTTE, NC           232°    71.6    22
*       blue    uhf     WBTV-DT 3.1     CBS     CHARLOTTE, NC           233°    71.4    23
*       blue    uhf     WGPX-DT 16.1    ION     BURLINGTON, NC          80°     36.4    14
*       blue    uhf     WJZY-DT 46.1    CW      BELMONT, NC             232°    70.2    47
*       blue    uhf     WCCB-DT 18.1    FOX     CHARLOTTE, NC           212°    62.3    27
*       blue    uhf     WUNG-DT 58.1    PBS     CHAPEL HILL, NC         208°    53.8    44
*       blue    uhf     WSOC-DT 9.1     ABC     CHARLOTTE, NC           212°    62.4    34
*       violet  uhf     WAXN-DT 64.1    IND     KANNAPOLIS, NC          212°    62.4    50
*       violet  uhf     WMYT-DT 55.1    MNT     ROCK HILL, SC           232°    70.2    39
Would either of these antennas help me get better reception and if so, which one would everyone suggest? Thanks for any help you can give.
post #3004 of 3314
TheFatKid4Life,

I wouldn't try either of the antennas you are looking at. They both have rabbit ears, and that is something you don't need. You are looking for broadcasters on the UHF band. There are somewhat small outdoor UHF antennas that folks use indoors. That is the next step up antenna-wise. Bear in mind, you have channels originating in several different directions. Are you adjusting the bowtie to try for reception of the various channels? If not, that would be a good idea. Have you tried the bowtie with the metal framed window? If not, that would also be an idea to try. NBC and PBS might be better from that one. Multiple antennas and an a-b switch may be an option for your situation. Good Luck.
post #3005 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by EscapeVelocity View Post

Radio Shack RS 15-1892 - The UFO


aka The Magic Mushroom, The Starship Enterprise, The Frisbee


This thing is GREAT! The geek factor is high on this one! LOL! Its freakin sweet! Its like a Smart Antenna without the tuner control interface.

I bought this one used....and it came with everthing but the instructions. Undaunted, i hooked it up, and found that I could set the channels and move the rotating antenna within the disc and set the positions and gain, pretty intuitively. I later downloaded and printed instructions in order to write this mini review. This one will be longer than others. Although I only have basically 2 different tower locations, this thing rocked, and would be 10 times more useful if I had more tower directions. Non the less, it was useful at my location....and performed excellently. This one was too close to call really with DB2 unamped, RS DA-5200, and the amped RCA ANT1500. Its got a nice backlit LCD readout for the Channel #, Direction #(kinda arbitrary), and Gain Level #. You can choose between 3 gain levels, 1-2-3, or Low-Medium-High, corresponding (according to the manual) to 13db Min, 18db Min, and 22db Min amplifier levels. I tried this out but ended up setting all my channels to high gain for no particular reason other than "let's go full blast...Warp Speed!" There are 12 selectable positions for the antenna within its disc. There are Plus and Minus buttons on the remote which change the gain level. There are also Left and Right arrow buttons that change the direction of the antenna within its disc. Additionally, there is a press and hold button to turn off the LED display backlight, and a number pad to input channels. The remote is pretty small, but fairly simple to operate. All the buttons are the same size, and its not backlit, and its kind of hard to read...but the layout is simple enough, and the buttons large enough to operate. There is one more large button on the remote with the label Store, for storing a group of settings for an individual channel once you have it set up in the right direction and gain for best signal on that particular channel. One thing to note is that when the antenna moves, the motor is audible, but not obnoxiously loud. Kinda reassuring actually, you can hear that its working. On the back there is a 75ohm coax output hookup and an Aux input, and a switch to choose between the antenna and the Aux input....plus the power input, comes with wall wart and 6ft of detachable coax, plus remote, and guide booklet. It has 2 telescoping Rabbit Ears that are adjustable but limited in motion by the disc. I didnt really test them out....nor any of the other units really. They are for VHF reception. This unit does not have an FM Trap, and can be used as an FM antenna via its Rabbit Ears. The disc measures slightly over 12", its a pretty large antenna. There are Left Right Arrow buttons for changing the antenna position within the disc, and Plus and Minus buttons for adjusting the gain on the front of the antenna left and right of the LCD info panel, plus the push and hold button for turning off the LCD backlight.

Performance.

I only tested this unit on top of the Oppo 970 DVD player, it didnt make it to the North corner window like the RS Single Bow Tie and the amped RCA ANT1500 and some others did. It worked pretty good, from my original positioning. But later, after I figured out the remote and operation, I moved it some, but still on top of the Oppo to optimize its performance. I found that all my Charleston channels that are clustered tightly to the North East at 45 miles worked best on postion 8 and slightly worse on postion 7 and 9....and my alternate PBS station at 23 miles SW worked best at position 1 or 12....I probably could have centered its performance on one or the other by twisting the unit slightly clockwise or counter clockwise. With a little tweaking, I had this thing running the board on all my channels, but it seemed that the signal strength may have been a little less than the RS DA-5200. My Vizio GV42LF LCD doesnt have signal strength bars....that is why I havent been reporting them.

How to set the antenna for a channel?

This is how I did it. I first changed to the desired channel on the Vizio TV. Then I entered the corresponding channel # on the remote which was then indicated on The UFO's LCD screen, in order to set the antenna direction and gain settings to maximize its performance on that channel. Then I moved the antenna direction with the Left and Right Arrows all the way from position 1 thru 12, it became obvious when the reception locked on. Lets say that channel 8 and 7 seemed like the best candidates from the quick run thru the positions. Then I moved up to 9 to check, and it still worked but with pixelation and dropouts. Back to 8 then on to 7 then 6...oops getting worse again. A/B 7 and 8, physically twist or move the unit if you need to, and there you have it. Position 8. Then check the gain level. Boom you are finished. Push and hold the store button, the info on the panel starts blinking, then press the store button again, and its set. You may have to adjust the gain earlier, if you are overloading your tuner. I cant comment on the effectiveness of the gain adjustment.

None the less...

Pretty geekin' sweet! Beam me up Scotty!


Here is a link to the UFO on Radio Shacks Website, where you can read user reviews and link to the manual in pdf format.

http://www.radioshack.com/sm-buy-the...i-2131034.html

eidt: The manual states that there are 99 channel presets available, Ch. 0-99.




Performance rankings.....based on EV's observations....Rough Guide

Channel Master 4220 with CM 7777 amp on roof
DB2 with Channel Master 7777 amp on roof
RS 1880
RCA ANT1500 amped
RS DA-5200
RS 15-1892 UFO
DB2 unamped indoors
Classic Single Bow Tie
Channel Master 4220 unamped indoors
Winegard SS-3000
RCA ANT108 (very similar to the RCA ANT110 and the Philips MANT110 and others)
Channel Master 4030
Philips MANT940
My First Attempt at the Coat Hanger Antenna, Youtube Video Specifications.... amped
RS 1868 Delta
RCA ANT1020
RCA ANT1500
Philips MANT 510
My First Attempt at the Coat Hanger Antenna, Youtube Video Specifications
RS 1870









I also have this antenna. Bought about 5 years ago during my antenna nightmare phase. Lived in a very wooded community about 12 miles from the broadcast towers. Started with cheap indoor antennas without success. Moved to more expensive ones and still nothing. Finally went to small rooftops antennas but still too much multipath and when the wind kicked up, watching tv was not possible. Finally tried a CM 4228 and a XG91. Still no good when it was windy. Fast forward 5 years and a new location. This time 3.9 miles from most of the stations. 9 miles from WWBT VHF 12.1 and 22 miles from CW. With the RS 1892 I was able to pick up all the stations but again when it was windy I would get some dropouts on certain stations. No matter how much I adjusted it I still would get the dropouts and 1-2 second pixelations. I then tried a Silver Sensor and so far I have not had any dropouts or pixelation. From my location in Midlothian VA I can get some Charlotesville stations but with a lot of pixelation. This with the antenna feeding into a 12db amplifier. HOA in this neighborhood are tough and would love to try a outdoor antenna. I am sure I could pull all of the Charlotesville stations and Norfolk stations. Maybe even some North Carolina stations. I have thought I might try the Quantom FX 102 to see if I could lock on the Charlotesville stations since the Silver Sensor almost could.
post #3006 of 3314
In the past week, the local widely-recognized delta breeze has returned here. This wind, and subsequent tree scatter, has been the chief problem for uhf reception here for years. Unlike in the past, I've removed rabbit ears from the reception equation. The 4-screw push-on vhf/uhf combiner has been replaced by the 2-screw push-on and a bowtie alone. Guess what? Even with tree scatter, all of my local uhf channels have been watchable. I watched a baseball game with about 10 seconds of a/v drops. Last year, with the rabbit ears and bowtie, I would have had at least that many drops every half inning. Other than removing the rabbit ears, nothing else has changed.

The Silver Sensor is a good antenna, but can you aim it straight upward easily? That's not a problem with the bowtie.

What works for reception is always what's best, regardless.
post #3007 of 3314
On page one of this thread were some antennas that were "On Deck". Ebay is full of these directional antennas on rotors for about $30 give or take (incl shipping). They are Yagi types.

Has any one tried them and which one is best. I tried to do some research. They are cheaply built buy work well... the bow-tie antennas are better apparently... The rotor has no indicator so it makes it hard to aim (due to the delay in digital to respond). They are made of plastic. Despite all the short comings I want to try one. I am just cutting the cable this month and going OTA. I bought a Used Terk HDTVa... Right now rabbit ears work (even thought they are all UHF stations (about 22 miles). The Terk I am sure will work, but there are some stations out a little further I might want to try some "DX'ing" or distant listening.. Thanks!
post #3008 of 3314
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmcjetpilot View Post

On page one of this thread were some antennas that were "On Deck". Ebay is full of these directional antennas on rotors for about $30 give or take (incl shipping). They are Yagi types.

Has any one tried them and which one is best. I tried to do some research. They are cheaply built buy work well... the bow-tie antennas are better apparently... The rotor has no indicator so it makes it hard to aim (due to the delay in digital to respond). They are made of plastic. Despite all the short comings I want to try one. I am just cutting the cable this month and going OTA. I bought a Used Terk HDTVa... Right now rabbit ears work (even thought they are all UHF stations (about 22 miles). The Terk I am sure will work, but there are some stations out a little further I might want to try some "DX'ing" or distant listening.. Thanks!

I dont really recommend them. I recommend you scoop up a rotor on ebay instead and use a better antenna (even small ones or indoor ones).

Gemini Orbit 360
Alliance U-100 or U-110
Radio Shack 1225A or B / Channel Master Colorotor 9510A


You will need a mast section (you can use chain link fence top rail which is easily cut with a hacksaw and can be easily found for about less than $10 for a 10.5 ft section.

Then get yourself an antenna that fits your requirements and limitations.

Recommended.

UHF Only

AntennaCraft Hoverman G1483 (some VHF High gain, low rear rejection at higher UHF giving it some bi-directionality)
Channel Master 4221 (some gain on VHF especially off the backside)
Antennas Direct DB4
Antennas Direct ClearStream2
Eagle Aspen DB2 Clone


With VHF High (as well as UHF)

Denny's EZ HD / RCA ANT751 (Denny has informed me that he has improved the UHF section of his EZ-HD and it now outperforms the stolen RCA ANT751 on UHF). Very good gain on VHF High. Some gain on FM.

Digitenna Suburban/Metro


With VHF Low/FM (as well as VHF High & UHF)

Channel Master 3016
post #3009 of 3314
Good Afternoon,

I am looking for the proper antenna to buy to get the most channels with the following tvfools output. I have been using an amplified antenna Jensen that I bought at a yard sale for 5$ it bring in 4.1 9.1 20.1 but not 27.1, 66.1, 17.1
I bought my mom a new TV and gave her my antenna and it is bringing in many channel for her. Se then bought me a canadian tire Quantum HDTV Amplified Antenna to replace mine but it not that good.

tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d5747d1ad584fb2

Any sugestion on the proper antenna (indoor) to get the most channels.
post #3010 of 3314
SunCrisis:

Welcome to the forum. Your tvfool report looks like this:
http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...5747d1ad584fb2

I don't think you should use an amplified antenna because it might be overloaded by your strong signals.

What antenna will work best for you depends upon the building construction and the location of the indoor antenna. The channels that you want are coming from two different directions: 4.1, 9.1, & 20.1 from 297 degrees and 27.1 & 66.1 from 162 degrees. If you find a location that is best for 27.1 & 66.1, then the other 3 should be OK because they are stronger. You will need to do some experimentation. You can extend the coax from the antenna with an F-81 coupler and some more RG6 coax to try different locations. I suggest a rabbit ears (VHF) and loop (UHF) antenna, like the Radio Shack #15-1874 if you can get it where you are:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2103077

F-81 couplers:
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2103459
http://www.radioshack.com/product/in...ductId=2103648

There is also a local reception thread for your area on the Canadian forum:
ON - Ottawa, Vanier, Gloucester, Orleans - OTA
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/show...126059&page=44
post #3011 of 3314
Hi everybody.

Looking for some recommendations on an indoor antenna. I live on the 5th floor of a sixth floor apartment building in Astoria, Queens, NY. I don't think any roof mounting will be possible and the smaller the antenna the better (small apartment). Here is my tvfool graphic:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...5747ccef4445e1

I'd like as many channels as possible, but I'd be happy with the major networks (ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, CW, PBS) with the best quality possible.

Thank you for the help!
post #3012 of 3314
I think you should try the Radio Shack #15-1874 mentioned previously post #3013 using an F-81 coupler and some extra coax to try different locations in your apartment. Don't use an amplified antenna; your signals are so strong they might cause overload. A lot depends upon which side of the building you are on and what other buildings are in the signal path.

The next step up would be a DB2, which is UHF only, but 7, 11, & 13 on VHF might be strong enough to overcome that. If not, then you can connect the rabbit ears for VHF with the DB2 for UHF using a UVSJ (Uhf-Vhf-Splitter-Joiner) which is an inexpensive low-loss device that looks like a 2-way splitter but is designed to combine a VHF antenna with a UHF antenna.

You asked keyboard21 about the Mohu Antenna in this post, and the Mohu Antenna thread is here:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1334089

More Mohu info here:
Mohu Leaf Omni-directional
http://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=138226
post #3013 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit73 View Post
I think you should try the Radio Shack #15-1874 mentioned previously using an F-81 coupler and some extra coax to try different locations in your apartment. Don't use an amplified antenna; your signals are so strong they might cause overload. A lot depends upon which side of the building you are on and what other buildings are in the signal path.
Forgive my ignorance, but what is the purpose of the F-81 coupler or coax? I'm new to antennas (trying to ditch cable) and I'm basically starting from scratch.
post #3014 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by OSUBuckly

Forgive me ignorance, but what is the purpose of the F-81 coupler or coax? I'm new to antennas (trying to ditch cable) and I'm basically starting from scratch.
It's a connector so you can add more length to the cable. Then you can try other spots in the room to hunt for signal.
Indoors, even a few inches left, right, up, down, in, or out can be the difference between 0 and perfect signal. Since indoor antennas usually have just a short cable attached, you need an "extension cord".
post #3015 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by OSUBuckly View Post
Forgive my ignorance, but what is the purpose of the F-81 coupler or coax? I'm new to antennas (trying to ditch cable) and I'm basically starting from scratch.
The cable on the RS 15-1874 is 4 feet long. You can try the antenna without extra coax first if you choose. That's not a problem. If you do, check for WABC, WNET, and WPIX. If these channels, broadcasting on the VHF band, fail to come in, extra coax can help. VHF signals suffer from interference produced by electronics. This can include your television. Good Luck.
post #3016 of 3314
I'm currently using an Antennas Direct DB2 for UHF and a Radio Shack 15-1874 for a single VHF station. They are feeding an HDHomerun dual tuner, with the DB2 connected to one tuner and the 15-1874 connected to the other tuner. I'm getting acceptable reception on all the channels I care about, so this is working reasonably well.

However, instead of devoting one tuner to UHF stations and one tuner to the VHF station, I'd like each tuner to have access to both the UHF and VHF stations. One option is to combine the signals with a UVSJ and then split them. Another option is to replace my two antennas with a single UHF/VHF antenna, such as the Winegard SS-3000 or the RCA ANT751. Having a single antenna would make for a cleaner setup, but the UVSJ would be cheaper. I'm mostly interested in what will be most reliable, though. What would you suggest I try? Other options I haven't considered are welcome as well.

Here is my tvfool report:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wr...5747657a13113e

I'm interested in WUNC, WTVD, WRDC, WLFL, WRAL, WRAZ, and WNCN. Both antennas are pointed at about 120 degrees where the majority of the towers are. Below are signal strengths and signal/noise qualities as reported by my HDHomerun software just now:

UHF with DB2 antenna:
WUNC ss=100 snq=100
WRAL ss=89 snq=99
WNCN ss=86 snq=100
WLFL ss=80 snq=77
WRDC ss=79 snq=73
WRAZ ss=80 snq=89

VHF with 15-1874 antenna:
WTVD ss= 85 snq=62 (usually the snq is around 80...not sure why it is so low right now)

Thanks for any thoughts you have!
post #3017 of 3314
Combining two antennas can introduce multipath and hurt reliability. Splitting an antennas signal definitely hurts reliability. You might be able to get away with it though. It's impossible to know. You might try splitting the signal from your DB2. You wouldn't have ABC, but you could add an a-b switch for that. I'd replace the RS budget with a more substantial pair of rabbit ears.
post #3018 of 3314
Combining the DB2 and the 1874 via UVSJ is fine. There is no disadvantage in doing so as opposed to trying to combine the antennas with a simple splitter as a "combiner". When combined with the UVSJ, the 1874's rabbit ears become the only functional element that is in use. If you can find a "more substantial set of rabbit ears", good luck...


Try the splitter to share the combined signal with each port of your tuner. The worse that can happen is that you loose some reception and may need to add an amplifier.
post #3019 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

Combining the DB2 and the 1874 via UVSJ is fine. There is no disadvantage in doing so as opposed to trying to combine the antennas with a simple splitter as a "combiner". When combined with the UVSJ, the 1874's rabbit ears become the only functional element that is in use. If you can find a "more substantial set of rabbit ears", good luck...


Try the splitter to share the combined signal with each port of your tuner. The worse that can happen is that you loose some reception and may need to add an amplifier.

Radio Shack sells a more substantial set of rabbit ears. I'd ask friends or relatives for a pair first. Using the 4-screw UVSJ they sell for rabbit ears/ bowtie, my uhf reception here was greatly less reliable. I wouldn't assume anything.
post #3020 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

Using the 4-screw UVSJ they sell for rabbit ears/ bowtie, my uhf reception here was greatly less reliable. I wouldn't assume anything.

Those old 300-ohm UVSJs aren't very good for digital. Radio Shack sells a 75-ohm coax-cable unit that looks like a standard splitter but the two ports are marked for each band, for about six bucks. The two antenna's signals are mixed into one output with very little loss, as opposed to a plain splitter.
post #3021 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by LithOTA View Post

Those old 300-ohm UVSJs aren't very good for digital. Radio Shack sells a 75-ohm coax-cable unit that looks like a standard splitter but the two ports are marked for each band, for about six bucks. The two antenna's signals are mixed into one output with very little loss, as opposed to a plain splitter.

You're absolutely right about not very good. I wonder why. The old-time rabbit ears are still a solid vhf performer. The bowtie is still a solid uhf performer. But, the old-time combiner is nothing but trouble. This is why my feeling is, try a uhf antenna alone first. If you add something and signal is lost, you know it.
post #3022 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

You might try splitting the signal from your DB2. You wouldn't have ABC, but you could add an a-b switch for that.

If I understand correctly what an a-b switch is, that won't work for my situation. I'm using software to schedule recordings off the antennas, so I need to be able to go back and forth between stations in software, not manually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

Try the splitter to share the combined signal with each port of your tuner. The worse that can happen is that you loose some reception and may need to add an amplifier.

Do you think the DB2 + 1874 + UVSJ + amp + splitter offers any advantage besides cost over an amplified UHF/VHF antenna plus a splitter? Should I expect the SS-3000 (or other amplified combo antennas) to perform as well as the DB2 for UHF and as well as the 1874 for VHF?

Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

Radio Shack sells a more substantial set of rabbit ears.

Are you talking about their amplified dipole/loop (the 15-254)? I'm not seeing other indoor antennas on their website I'd call more substantial rabbit ears.

Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

This is why my feeling is, try a uhf antenna alone first. If you add something and signal is lost, you know it.

That's a good point. I can try splitting just my UHF antenna and then just my VHF antenna to see how much of an impact the splitter will have. I know I'll be splitting one way or another, so that will give me an idea of whether I need an amp. Although if I do need an amp, I'm inclined to just try an amplified UHF/VHF to start with to cut down on the clutter of components.
post #3023 of 3314
conquistador,

The SS-3000 is probably equal to the 1874 on vhf. It is not an equal to the DB2 for uhf. That doesn't mean it can't work for you. If splitting the DB2 stills gives plenty of signal, trying the SS-3000 might work.

The vhf dipoles at RS look like this when in use: www.kyes.com/antenna/rabbitearinhand.gif I forget the model number. Ask friends and relatives first. They may have lots of them.
post #3024 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

You're absolutely right about not very good. I wonder why. The old-time rabbit ears are still a solid vhf performer.

It's because twin-lead is bad for ATSC (unless it's done properly). Obviously you need some twin-lead on pigtail-type baluns, but it's best to get the signal into 75-ohm coax as soon as possible.
post #3025 of 3314
Hey all! First off - name is Kelly from Wichita, KS and look forward to becoming a regular contributor here at AVS. I am currently in the market for a OTA attic solution that will service 3-4 HDTV's with various length runs between 20 - 100 feet. My house is typical 60's ranch construction and my shingles are composite mounted to tar paper on slat \\ plywood. I don't mine ponying up a little extra for a larger antenna if you think it will make a difference in my situation. Would prefer to buy the Ant local versus online.

I am not allowed to post URL's yet so couldn't give you my TV Fool results unfortunately. My stations are both VHF and UHF and range from 3 miles to 38 miles. Most are in the green zone, and 3 are in the yellow zone.

Anyhow, thanks in advance folks!

Kelly
post #3026 of 3314
Here's a copy of my TVFool for those who don't mind lending a hand-
LL
post #3027 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by LithOTA View Post

It's because twin-lead is bad for ATSC (unless it's done properly). Obviously you need some twin-lead on pigtail-type baluns, but it's best to get the signal into 75-ohm coax as soon as possible.

Rabbit ears (w/twin-lead) and bowtie (w/twin-lead) both work fine. I think it has to be the combiner (RS 150-1297a). It looks like they've discontinued it.
post #3028 of 3314
Wow,I wish I had it so good! You could build a mclapp 4 bay and add a preamp to drive the 3 or 4 tv's.Something like this:

http://m4antenna.eastmasonvilleweath...0Drawings.html

http://www.solidsignal.com/pview.asp...u=615798396145

Be sure to check out this thread and re post your tvfool results.Lots of good diy info.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...98265&page=155

Hope this helps.
post #3029 of 3314
Thread Starter 
New antenna spotted. Resembles the excellent Digitenna DUV-S Suburban.

RCA or Audiovox AT3022

post #3030 of 3314
I'm not sure if this is for real. The Amazon listing refers to an indoor, amplified antenna.
The blue insulators and the dipole shape looks like Antennacraft to me. Have you found this thing anywhere else?
Also, in this photo, it looks like tha antenna is up-side-down. Who attaches directors to the bottom of the boom?
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