or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Technical › EV's Recommended & Top Rated DTV Indoor UHF/VHF Set Top Antenna Review Round-Up Guide
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

EV's Recommended & Top Rated DTV Indoor UHF/VHF Set Top Antenna Review Round-Up Guide - Page 109

post #3241 of 3314
Has EscapeVelocity, the author of this thread, been heard from? He did marvelous and exhaustive work in his evaluations of different indoor antennas.

Since that time, we have had several new antenna products come on the market. Some of these may be repackaged "same old, same old" products, others are highly acclaimed, such as the Mohu Leaf, Mohu Leaf Ultimate, and various new Antennas Direct models.
post #3242 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by seatacboy View Post

Has EscapeVelocity, the author of this thread, been heard from? He did marvelous and exhaustive work in his evaluations of different indoor antennas.

Since that time, we have had several new antenna products come on the market. Some of these may be repackaged "same old, same old" products, others are highly acclaimed, such as the Mohu Leaf, Mohu Leaf Ultimate, and various new Antennas Direct models.
I think he may now be posting on some other forum, but not sure. But you are correct, this has been a very thorough and informative thread that is worth continuing. Most notable new products include the upgraded paper thin flat panel antennas, which include the Mohu Leaf and the Winegard Flatwave. But I still endorse the Terk HDTVi/HDTVa as a very good indoor antenna, along with the Clearstream 1 or DB2 used indoors. And there is always the basic rabbit ears and loop from RadioShack that is a strong performer in suburban situations.
post #3243 of 3314
EV's last posts on this and the other forum (www.dtvusaforum.com) were apparently back in Jan 2013.....
post #3244 of 3314
I noticed this morning that Walmart is now carrying the Mohu Leaf Ultimate. Good antenna but overpriced at $79. New version with low noise amplifier. And the similar Amped Winegard Flatwave is now more reasonably priced at Costco, I think either $39 or $49. And Walmart also now has the Clearstream 2V at $98, in addition to the Clearstream 1. So there are some good indoor antennas available at Walmart, despite what their clueless sales clerks may say. Better selection than Target, Sears, or Kmart.
post #3245 of 3314
So, this is my TVFool profile: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae3d9bde3628

I am stuck with an indoor antenna, and would prefer omnidirectional. The location in my house is on the lower level of a split-level house (not a basement, but the south side floor is maybe 3 feet below ground level). The antenna needs to go on the northish side, but would be next to a window.

Would something simple like the Leaf work? Do I need to get one of the amplified ones?

Thanks in advance!
post #3246 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by LurkerDan View Post

So, this is my TVFool profile: http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae3d9bde3628

I am stuck with an indoor antenna, and would prefer omnidirectional. The location in my house is on the lower level of a split-level house (not a basement, but the south side floor is maybe 3 feet below ground level). The antenna needs to go on the northish side, but would be next to a window.

Would something simple like the Leaf work? Do I need to get one of the amplified ones?

Thanks in advance!

The Leaf might work, but it isn't likely to. That's because of the 2 VHF stations, plus your window is facing the wrong way. A rabbit ears loop combo is more likely to get the VHF stations. The Terk HDTVi or HDTVa would probably be a better choice. If you really want to try one of the flat antennas like the Leaf, the HDBlade/Flatwave should have slightly better VHF performance. Expect to have to adjust antenna location, height and aim for best results. Try unamped first. Good Luck.
post #3247 of 3314
Hello.
Recently moved into a condo and wanted to buy an indoor antenna to pick up local TV stations.
This is my TVFool analysis result. http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46aec88bdbee07
Any recommendations in which antenna to get?
Thanks.
post #3248 of 3314
A simple unamplified loop and rabbit ears is all that you need to get started. Place it in front of a north-facing window, if possible.

Do NOT use any amplifiers!
post #3249 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProjectSHO89 View Post

A simple unamplified loop and rabbit ears is all that you need to get started. Place it in front of a north-facing window, if possible.

Do NOT use any amplifiers!

Great. Thanks. unamplified it is.
post #3250 of 3314
I went with a Radio Shack 15-1874 budget antenna and it picked most of the channels but it was loosing signal frequently and the location was not ideal for the wife. I ordered a Winegard FL-5000 flat antenna from Amazon and it works great. It picks up all channels and it is out of sight, which helps with WAF. Just wanted to share my experience here. Thanks.
post #3251 of 3314
Summit Source is selling the classic bowtie plus push-on balun for $2.49. smile.gif
post #3252 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by deltaguy View Post

Summit Source is selling the classic bowtie plus push-on balun for $2.49. smile.gif
Good to hear since Radioshack has regretably discontinued this basic item.
post #3253 of 3314
Hi,

Here are my TVfool results:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae2ba47011be

I currently have rabbit ears with loop and built-in amp but the signal is kind of weak and susceptible to local interference (switching of lights, car driving by). The antenna is just sitting in the living room of a one storey house. I was thinking of getting an "outdoor" antenna and install it in the attic but most of these are UHF only, or VHF-Hi and UHF. The TVfool results don't show it but there are a few other stations in the VHF-Lo range that we enjoy watching (when the conditions are just right). I was wondering if the Terk HDTV might give me better results and if the beam width is wide enough to capture the stations that are sitting 60 degrees apart without having to re-orient the antenna. Thanks.
Edited by JeeMart - 8/29/13 at 12:00pm
post #3254 of 3314
CIII-DT in Ottawa recently moved from VHF 6 to UHF 14 this summer, so that eliminates the low-VHF requirement. The TVFool database has not been updated.

I'd try a ClearStream 2V pointed due west. It has a wide 65-70 degree beamwidth on UHF and high-VHF.
post #3255 of 3314
I live in an old apartment building with LOTS of concrete walls between me and the stations in my area. I'm using a Terk2 amplified antenna and am about 30-40 feet above street level. The antenna is in the only window available to me and it unfortunately faces East. Repositioning doesn't help much because the farther from the window I am, the choppier the signals get and the Terk will fall off the window sill unless it's right up against the window. Looking at my TV fool results, I can't receive any station with a -dB lower than 56 or so despite having scanned and rescanned for available stations. I was living on a higher westward facing floor while the management remodeled my apartment and was able to get a lot more stations than I can now. Here's my TV fool analysis:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae68cfb3036d

Anyhow, I found this forum while searching for opinions about the RCA ANT650 that was recommended in this month's edition of Consumer Reports. Thanks so much for being here!

Marc
post #3256 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcKyle64 View Post

I live in an old apartment building with LOTS of concrete walls between me and the stations in my area. I'm using a Terk2 amplified antenna and am about 30-40 feet above street level. The antenna is in the only window available to me and it unfortunately faces East. Repositioning doesn't help much because the farther from the window I am, the choppier the signals get and the Terk will fall off the window sill unless it's right up against the window. Looking at my TV fool results, I can't receive any station with a -dB lower than 56 or so despite having scanned and rescanned for available stations. I was living on a higher westward facing floor while the management remodeled my apartment and was able to get a lot more stations than I can now. Here's my TV fool analysis:

http://www.tvfool.com/?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=29&q=id%3d46ae68cfb3036d

Anyhow, I found this forum while searching for opinions about the RCA ANT650 that was recommended in this month's edition of Consumer Reports. Thanks so much for being here!

Marc

What sort of amplifier are you using with the Terk TV2? Are you currently able to watch CBS and PBS reliably? Those are your VHF signals there. Do you have something like a TV tray that you could move near to the window in order to try different heights for the antenna?
post #3257 of 3314
I can get PBS very reliably, CBS can be shaky but will come in okay for 10 minutes and then start with the interference lines and blocks with an occasional 'no signal'. Other times it will be strong all day & night. I'm using the amplifier that came with my Terk 2 flat antenna, I'm not sure how much it's supposed to boost.

The other night I did a rescan of the digital converter box and signals from Memphis which is 140 miles away came in for about an hour. It must have been something to do with the atmosphere because they stopped coming in after that. What was odd was that the weaker stations close to me in Little Rock STILL didn't come in strong enough for my box to get past the 'no signal' message on my TV. Of course my window faces towards Memphis.

A TV tray won't work because the a/c is installed right below the window with the air ducts right at kneecap height.

I knew the digital switchover was going to be a big pain for us. Why didn't the FCC specify a proper antenna standard that reliably worked like the old rabbit ears and bow tie did for my analog TV? I've wasted more time and money trying to make their junk work than I ever did back then. I still refuse to get cable, no matter how bad it gets. I have better ways to spend $60-$90 a month than paying to watch reality shows on the History Channel, commercial interrupted movies on AMC, and not-playing-music-anymore MTV.
post #3258 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcKyle64 View Post

I can get PBS very reliably, CBS can be shaky but will come in okay for 10 minutes and then start with the interference lines and blocks with an occasional 'no signal'. Other times it will be strong all day & night. I'm using the amplifier that came with my Terk 2 flat antenna, I'm not sure how much it's supposed to boost.

The other night I did a rescan of the digital converter box and signals from Memphis which is 140 miles away came in for about an hour. It must have been something to do with the atmosphere because they stopped coming in after that. What was odd was that the weaker stations close to me in Little Rock STILL didn't come in strong enough for my box to get past the 'no signal' message on my TV. Of course my window faces towards Memphis.

A TV tray won't work because the a/c is installed right below the window with the air ducts right at kneecap height.

I knew the digital switchover was going to be a big pain for us. Why didn't the FCC specify a proper antenna standard that reliably worked like the old rabbit ears and bow tie did for my analog TV? I've wasted more time and money trying to make their junk work than I ever did back then. I still refuse to get cable, no matter how bad it gets. I have better ways to spend $60-$90 a month than paying to watch reality shows on the History Channel, commercial interrupted movies on AMC, and not-playing-music-anymore MTV.

I'm still not sure on exactly what antenna you are using now. The Terk TV2 is an unamplified rabbit ears/loop antenna. If you are using an antenna similar to the RCA you asked about, it probably won't do a lot better. The RCA weighs somewhere around 2 pounds. Again, you will have no choice with regards to the height. The window sill will be the only choice. A lightweight antenna, like the new thin ones, would give a better chance for different height and location. A classic bowtie wouldn't be out of the question for you. It's impossible to predict what, if anything, will work indoors.
post #3259 of 3314
I went to the Terk website. I have the FDTV2A flat antenna with an inline amp.
post #3260 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcKyle64 View Post

I went to the Terk website. I have the FDTV2A flat antenna with an inline amp.

That certainly looks similar to the RCA. If you haven't tried unamplified, I'd do so. I like the classic bowtie available from Summit Source. I learned Summit Source was selling them from this:

http://www.hdtvexpert.com/?tag=indoor-tv-antenna-review
post #3261 of 3314
I just won an RCA ANT525 with the rabbit ear antennas and a round UHF loop with adjustable gain control on eBay for $13.75. The specs say it has 45dB of amplification, so if I can't pull in stations with this, then it's not gonna happen! I just have to stay near the window. If it works better than what I have now, then I'll keep my Terk for my other TV and bid on a cheap converter box.

Thanks for the input guys!
post #3262 of 3314
Quote:
The specs say it has 45dB of amplification,

Yeah, that's a train wreck coming down the track....
post #3263 of 3314
Well, if I unplug the amplification on my Terk, then I lose all my stations completely except for 7.1 and it's two sub-channels and 16.1

Four channels out of fourteen that come in now. Since the gain is adjustable, I can turn it up for the weak stations and dial it back for the strong ones. I can always sell it on eBay if I'm not happy.
post #3264 of 3314
Unplugging the power supply to amplifiers usually turns them into a brick. Your results demonstrate that.
post #3265 of 3314
I've personally compared the classic bowtie to a Philips MANT510. The MANT510 has 50db gain and is adjustable. It's also collecting dust. In an earlier test, the hdtvexpert saw the bowtie defeat an antenna with an asking price of around $80. There are no guarantees of course.
post #3266 of 3314
Have indoor antennas improved since this thread started?

If they held a vote here at AVS for the greatest indoor antenna of all times--which one would win?
post #3267 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artwood View Post

Have indoor antennas improved since this thread started?

If they held a vote here at AVS for the greatest indoor antenna of all times--which one would win?
I don't think there have been any significant upgrades or revolutionary breakthroughs. Some are still decent, others are still overpriced crap. The basic rabbit ears and loop from Radioshack is still a good starting point, and I like the Terk HDTVi/HDTVa as an upgrade option. But I still think a Clearstream 1 or 2, and a DB2 make good indoor antennas. Although some folks have had good luck with the Mohu Leaf and Winegard Flatwave. But they tend to be trendy overpriced novelties with a slim and discreet form factor. But apparently they can perform well in certain situations. But again, location, location, location.
post #3268 of 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artwood View Post

Have indoor antennas improved since this thread started?

If they held a vote here at AVS for the greatest indoor antenna of all times--which one would win?

The greatest indoor antenna of all times would be rabbit ears. The runner-up would be the classic bowtie.
post #3269 of 3314
3271 posts to hear that rabbit ears are great!

I tried a clearstream 2 but it couldn't overcome aluminum siding in my apartment complex. Can any indoor antenna overcome that or do you just have to go outside in such a situation?

I'm back to DirecTV but sometimes I do miss subchannels that I don't get anymore and sometimes OTA HD is better than what satellite provides.
post #3270 of 3314
My "Best Indoor" Antennas have been a 4-Bay Bowtie with Preamp hidden behind a big chair in my old apartment, a CM-4228 8-Bay Bowtie with Preamp in an upstairs closet I currently use and my son has a UHF CM-4228 with Preamp and a Hi-VHF YA-1713 Antennas in his Attic (technically still "indoors").

There is no such thing as ONE "Best" Indoor Antenna, even if we restrict the definition to those intended to be connected to the TV via a relatively short cord....and are small and hence LOW GAIN.

a) Except when VERY close to FM or TV transmitters, a Variable-Gain, Amplified Antenna is preferable for indoor use for two reasons: 1) if it doesn't suffer from Overload, the SYSTEM Noise Figure could improve by 5-10 dB, meaning it is more Sensitive and 2) an amplified antenna allows the designer to make a much better SWR match, thereby reducing not only the Mis-Match Loss, but also the Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) digital signal decoding Loss.

b) Many people have LOCAL towers located in several directions that NEED an Quasi-Omni (usually Bi-Directional) Antenna Pattern, which is typical of Rabbit-Ears+Loop Antennas.

c) Many people have reflected Multipath signals that NEED a Directional Antenna Pattern to suppress the unwanted multipath signals, which is typical of Silver Sensor LPDA (aka Terk HDTVa & HDTVi) Antennas. These people also MAY benefit from a Window mounted Antenna, such as a 2-Bay Bowtie.

d) Many people have lots of metal rebar in the walls and/or Aluminized Mylar Thermal "Wrap" and/or Low-E Glass with metallic coating, all of which greatly attenuates VHF/UHF signals....and hence need a LOT higher Antenna Gain than provided by simple Rabbit-Ears+Loop.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Technical
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Technical › EV's Recommended & Top Rated DTV Indoor UHF/VHF Set Top Antenna Review Round-Up Guide