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'True Blood' in HD on HBO - Page 5

post #121 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by adpayne View Post

For those who thought the vampires at the end was over-blown, I disagree.

Bill is from the 1800's and still has manners and values from that era. It just shows that vampires, as well as humans, have their own fringe part of society. Bill wants as normal a life (unlife? ) as possible, and to fit in. His visitors obviously enjoy revelling in their power, etc.

I don't think it's a matter of manners it's just a simple matter of them looking stupid as they overact for the camera. Hardly scary. It happened last week when bald vamp was having sex and looking at the video camera. It's not as if they are werewolves and transform into something with a mouthful of teeth they can brandish like weapons. They just grow two tiny little fangs. Julia Roberts has a more fearsome looking set of teeth.

Danny Huston did scary vamp much better in 30 Days of Night. In True Blood they've almost took it to the parody level of Fright Night, and since this isn't the 80s that's not an improvement in a show aimed at being different and adult.
post #122 of 3651
If the spoiler stuff is even half true this series is going to be even more fun then I thought. Hmm we might need our thread like the lost spoiler one.
post #123 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

For those who think it's a vampire show, you are completely missing the mark. If you take a step back and look at the bigger picture, it's an obvious case study on race relations in America, disguised as a vampire show. The creators are actually quite clever in using something that doesn't even exist as a vehicle to explore something as volatile and controversial as race. And they throw enough comparisons to actual race in the show, to punctuate the point.

Actually you've completely missed the mark. Yes, again this is a vampire tale that uses vampirism as a metaphor for the social condition, but that's a very old and overused idea.

This is not about race relations either, it's about gay rights. I don't know how you could miss that since the commentary hasn't been that subtle. It's in the titles every week "God hates 'Fangs" and they've all come "out of the coffin."

That's one more part I don't really care for in the show. I'm tired of seeing vampires used for social commentary. Especially when they drag in some university professors to discuss the subject and over analyze undead beings who drink your blood. That's when it stops becoming entertainment and just becomes pretentious, like it did with the special that HBO aired a few weeks ago.
post #124 of 3651
For me True Blood is brilliant. Funny as hell, a new take on the tired vampire theme, appealing characters. The writing is wonderful, acting is first rate, the photography is beautiful. We'll see how it holds up.

And you can hurt your brain trying to find metaphors for vampirism here. I buy the fact that in First Blood vampires are a fascinating race or species all on their own, not a substitute for some other group.

But Sookie, Sookie, Sookie ....
post #125 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

They just grow two tiny little fangs. Julia Roberts has a more fearsome looking set of teeth.

Actually ... it's quite clear that they ... er ... re-vamped the vamp teeth between the first and second episodes. They are now more properly canineish as opposed to the viperish fangs in episode one.
post #126 of 3651
After watching the 2nd episode I like the show somewhat more, which is good (better than losing interest). Since this is basically a campy comedy so far trying to look too "deep" is most likely going to just be a disappointment.

larry
post #127 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Actually you've completely missed the mark. Yes, again this is a vampire tale that uses vampirism as a metaphor for the social condition, but that's a very old and overused idea.

This is not about race relations either, it's about gay rights. I don't know how you could miss that since the commentary hasn't been that subtle. It's in the titles every week "God hates 'Fangs" and they've all come "out of the coffin."

That's one more part I don't really care for in the show. I'm tired of seeing vampires used for social commentary. Especially when they drag in some university professors to discuss the subject and over analyze undead beings who drink your blood. That's when it stops becoming entertainment and just becomes pretentious, like it did with the special that HBO aired a few weeks ago.

Um... I don't see how you can say that I, "completely missed the mark." Of course there are also gay references as well. But the racial overtones far outweigh the gay references. However, in either case, we're talking about the same thing. And that's relationships and prejudices against people who are different than themselves.
post #128 of 3651
Actually, I think VisionOn is "more" correct in describing which group at which the anti-bigotry message of this show is aimed. After all, religion and prejudicial interpretations of the Bible were used as justification for racial discrimination in the past, just as they're used to discriminate against and intimidate gays today. In fact, if you remove the religious justification for anti-gay bigotry and denial of civil rights to that group, there's nothing left that justifies it at all except "fear of the unknown" and willful ignorance. Intolerant religious leaders are a target rich environment for this show as we've seen in these last two episodes. Overt, public, and "accepted" racial discrimination led by religious leaders and justified by the Bible, however, ended long ago. Thank God. For gays, the struggle is likely to continue for some time.

The reason it's an imperfect analogy, of course, is that people of color and homosexuals are not inherently dangerous, thus there's no rational reason for supposedly civilized people to fear them. Vampires, well, not so much.
post #129 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

Um... I don't see how you can say that I, "completely missed the mark." Of course there are also gay references as well. But the racial overtones far outweigh the gay references.

Race is hardly the prominent theme at work here. The gay subtext has been mentioned numerous times in critics reviews and discussed at length whenever Ball gets interviewed because it's so obvious. I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a homosexual love scene between two vamps at some point or if there's an argument about should vampires be allowed to get married.

This sort of thing is a cliche that appears in almost every vampire story. It would be more original if they just used vampires as a method of telling a story about vampires, and not using it to reflect society.

One thing is for certain. If the gay chef meets Bill and doesn't offer some words of empathy about their similar fights for acceptance, then the show is just hiding behind the metaphor and isn't being daring at all.
post #130 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Race is hardly the prominent theme at work here. The gay subtext has been mentioned numerous times in critics reviews and discussed at length whenever Ball gets interviewed because it's so obvious. I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a homosexual love scene between two vamps at some point or if there's an argument about should vampires be allowed to get married.

This sort of thing is a cliche that appears in almost every vampire story. It would be more original if they just used vampires as a method of telling a story about vampires, and not using it to reflect society.

One thing is for certain. If the gay chef meets Bill and doesn't offer some words of empathy about their similar fights for acceptance, then the show is just hiding behind the metaphor and isn't being daring at all.

So you think the developing relationship between Sooki and Bill is about gay issues? Again, yes there are gay themes. But they are far outshadowed by the racial themes. The main issue isn't about 'gay' vampires, but about 'vampires'. Which puts things squarly in the 'racial' catagory in the context of this show. And like I said, in the end the issues of intolerance concerning gay and race aren't all that far apart, so I really don't know what it is you're trying to argue about.
post #131 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

So you think the developing relationship between Sooki and Bill is about gay issues? Again, yes there are gay themes. But they are far outshadowed by the racial themes.

Again, what racial themes? If anything, racial differences are downplayed here. The best friend, who happens to be black, has a crush on the brother, who happens to be white. The most distinctive characteristic of Lafayette is that he's flamboyantly gay, not that he's black. There's not a shred of racial animosity or bigotry demonstrated by any of the cast thus far. And as I pointed out above, only gays share open and accepted discrimination [along with vampires], encouraged and pandered to by religious and political leaders, in this current day and age. That is a central theme of the show so far. If you're seeing racial oxen being gored in this show, you're imagining it. Ball clearly has a different metaphor in mind.
post #132 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Again, what racial themes? If anything, racial differences are downplayed here. The best friend, who happens to be black, has a crush on the brother, who happens to be white. The most distinctive characteristic of Lafayette is that he's flamboyantly gay, not that he's black. There's not a shred of racial animosity or bigotry demonstrated by any of the cast thus far. And as I pointed out above, only gays share open and accepted discrimination [along with vampires], encouraged and pandered to by religious and political leaders, in this current day and age. That is a central theme of the show so far. If you're seeing racial oxen being gored in this show, you're imagining it. Ball clearly has a different metaphor in mind.

Good grief.

Metaphorically speaking, the vampire issue is 'racial', not 'gay'. If you can't see that, then there is no point in me trying to further convince you or anyone else here.
post #133 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

Good grief.

Metaphorically speaking, the vampire issue is 'racial', not 'gay'. If you can't see that, then there is no point in me trying to further convince you or anyone else here.

Well golly, good grief backatcha'. That's the second time you've mentioned it, as if it's a given. Pray-tell, just what is it, exactly, that ties racial discrimination and the vampire metaphor together, while at the same time managing to exclude gay discrimination, to which the show is actually alluding? Just for those of us who can't seem to summon that level of insight. And, if you can point to any evidence presented in the show to back it up, that'd be nice too.
post #134 of 3651
Pardon me, but what the hell does it matter? Are we seriously debating the philosophical meaning behind a fictional vampire television drama? Race...sexual preference...it's a show about vampires with the lead role being played by a Kiwi as a southern American girl.
post #135 of 3651
And we can also add to the discussion that Alan Ball is also gay. Which is another reason this topic keeps appearing when he's interviewed. He might try to downplay the elements as just a coincidental sign of the times but the ideas are already there based on what we've seen so far and in his previous work.

The question is will the series bring the vampire rights amendment to the front or send it to the back so we can concentrate on Sookie and Bill's relationship?

This is similar to Doctor Who and how Russel T Davis approached it. He may have been writing a show about a time traveler because he was a fan, but that didn't stop him adding gay themes to the storylines.
post #136 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrcorwin View Post

Pardon me, but what the hell does it matter? Are we seriously debating the philosophical meaning behind a fictional vampire television drama? Race...sexual preference...it's a show about vampires with the lead role being played by a Kiwi as a southern American girl.

That's the beauty of art. You can read as much, or in your case as little, as you want to within the piece. If you want to watch the show at a surface level, why not? As one poster mentioned a page or so back, accurately in my view, Anna Paquin is hot! Whoo Hoo! However, there are other, larger themes at play in this particular piece and those are fodder for discussion as well. That's what these threads in this forum are for, last time I checked.
post #137 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

That's the beauty of art. You can read as much, or in your case as little, as you want to within the piece. If you want to watch the show at a surface level, why not? As one poster mentioned a page or so back, accurately in my view, Anna Paquin is hot! Whoo Hoo! However, there are other, larger themes at play in this particular piece and those are fodder for discussion as well. That's what these threads in this forum are for, last time I checked.

I still say that debating whether or not there are hidden gay/racial messages is taking it a bit too far. I like the show, but let's be honest...it's a show about vampires. Citizen Kane it ain't. There is a real world out there folks...with real people.
post #138 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrcorwin View Post

I still say that debating whether or not there are hidden gay/racial messages is taking it a bit too far. I like the show, but let's be honest...it's a show about vampires. Citizen Kane it ain't. There is a real world out there folks...with real people.

If you feel it's "taking it too far" to discuss (debate is the wrong word in this case) issues that the show is not shy about highlighting and which are the propulsive engine behind the plotline, then you're free to enjoy it at whatever level you want. Won't get any rebukes from me. Anna Paquin is, indeed, hot.

Good sci-fi, and this show falls within the generally accepted boundaries of that genre, always seeks to hold a mirror up to society - commenting with metaphor, allegory, and allusion. If it generates discussion that contributes a little enlightenment to the world, so much the better. You don't need a "Citizen Kane" to do that. Sometimes merely some 'True Blood' will do.
post #139 of 3651
post #140 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Good sci-fi, and this show falls within the generally accepted boundaries of that genre, always seeks to hold a mirror up to society - commenting with metaphor, allegory, and allusion.

e.g. "The Day the Earth Stool Still", "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and "Forbidden Planet".
post #141 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrcorwin View Post


My Mama used to tan my hide when I did that to her. So, let me ask this of you without rolling mine. Were you a fan of 'Moonlight'? Was its more mainstream approach to the vampire saga more of what you're looking for in a drama about imaginary blood suckers? (disclaimer: I never watched it; only describing what I read about it.)

Because, whether you like it or not, Allan Ball is writing the show he wanted to write. And the subtext is clearly there.
post #142 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

Good grief.

Metaphorically speaking, the vampire issue is 'racial', not 'gay'. If you can't see that, then there is no point in me trying to further convince you or anyone else here.

I can see both points of view on this. Obviously, Bill and Sookie's developing relationship has more parallels to race than sexual orientation. But the religious objections favor the latter.

Bottom line: It's a show about prejudice, and fear of the unknown. Add in some vampires, and unrequited love, and you get an interesting show...in my view.

Art
post #143 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

My Mama used to tan my hide when I did that to her. So, let me ask this of you without rolling mine. Were you a fan of 'Moonlight'? Was its more mainstream approach to the vampire saga more of what you're looking for in a drama about imaginary blood suckers? (disclaimer: I never watched it; only describing what I read about it.)

Because, whether you like it or not, Allan Ball is writing the show he wanted to write. And the subtext is clearly there.

I haven't seen it either, but I'm not concerned about the approach. I just don't care. I enjoy the show...I'm not focusing on the subtext and I don't believe the subtext deserves the focus either.
post #144 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

That's the beauty of art. You can read as much, or in your case as little, as you want to within the piece. If you want to watch the show at a surface level, why not? As one poster mentioned a page or so back, accurately in my view, Anna Paquin is hot! Whoo Hoo! However, there are other, larger themes at play in this particular piece and those are fodder for discussion as well. That's what these threads in this forum are for, last time I checked.

Indeed, and this is why I prefer shows like this as they have far more going on intellectually, above and below the surface, they exercise my brain. This is also the reason these sorts of show often fail, the "average" viewer doesn't want to think about what they're watching, and as noted, they don't have to, but for those of us who like the deeper, thoughtful art of a show, it's there for us as well.

If I want mindless entertainment, and I do quite often, I watch Prison Break, TSCC, and Fringe looks to fall in that category as well.
post #145 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

...
One thing is for certain. If the gay chef meets Bill and doesn't offer some words of empathy about their similar fights for acceptance, then the show is just hiding behind the metaphor and isn't being daring at all.

edit: Oops, I just made a comment that might be a spoiler.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

It's been awhile since I read the books but I don't think the gay chef was even a character in the books, just added for the TV audience. But maybe I just forgot him as he wasn't a central character.

- Tom
post #146 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by trbarry View Post

edit: Oops, I just made a comment that might be a spoiler.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

It's been awhile since I read the books but I don't think the gay chef was even a character in the books, just added for the TV audience. But maybe I just forgot him as he wasn't a central character.

- Tom

Yea, he was in the book. With the darker sex side of the town.
post #147 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rutgar View Post

Good grief.

Metaphorically speaking, the vampire issue is 'racial', not 'gay'. If you can't see that, then there is no point in me trying to further convince you or anyone else here.

As my sister called me last night and raved about this new show called Trublood. She agrees with you. When Sookie's brother finds out the women he is having sex with had sex with a Vamp he's disgusted and fascinated. Sort of once you go vamp you don't go back, mentaliy there. Afraid sex with a vamp is better then with him.

I did find it interesting that bill did confess while he did not own slaves, his farther did. Now will they play upon that? Any descendants still living in the area who want to sue. Sins of the father often fall upon the son?

Blonde Vamp and US politics. I still hope they expand on that. You know she killed the Rev and his family. Well we don't know but I suspect! Look what Bill did the couple who attacked Sookie. He even states other vamps have more power if they are older. Blonde Vampire is the oldest we know of so far...
post #148 of 3651
I found the second episode greatly improved over the first. The humor was tighter and Tara was much less annoying. Her pining for Sookie's brother is really cute.

I never have really noticed Ana Paquin in anything before, but dang if she doesn't have a certain amount of sex appeal in this thing. Especially with all those short skirts she was wearing. And, her co-worker at the bar is downright smoking. Hope we continue to see alot more of her.
post #149 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by IrmoGamecoq View Post

I found the second episode greatly improved over the first. The humor was tighter and Tara was much less annoying. Her pining for Sookie's brother is really cute.

I watched the Screener on-line and I really like this Tara much more then the one they had before. The Pre-tara (Brooke Kerr )look like she just got off a model bus and way to cute to be Tara. Booke Kerr could get any man she wanted with out the whole pining which is why I think they replaced her. She was just too attractive for this story line to have worked..

CurrentTara (Rutina Wesley) has just right amount of looks , 'tude and acting ability that makes me want to see more.
post #150 of 3651
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wytchone View Post

CurrentTara (Rutina Wesley) has just right amount of looks , 'tude and acting ability that makes me want to see more.

Yep, she's actually a very attractive girl...but her attitude and probably a lot of insecurity is what's keeping her from getting her man. Plus, the man she's seeking is a bit of a doofus.
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