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The Unofficial Sony GDM-FW900 thread - Page 5

post #121 of 167
You can use the program PowerStrip for PC that lets you set custom timings and resolutions beyond what is supported via the driver/windows.
post #122 of 167
I'm a little surprised these CRTs still work well after 8 years usage. My experience with CRT monitors was that they suffered from phospher degradation worse than CRT televisions do; all that high Hz progressive scan white light? I guess you could use something like a GammaX unit for gamma correction if there is no way to correct the source signal for if/when this happens.

I don't know about video cards today but most video cards back in the CRT era did a very poor job at VGA output quality and had very dumbed down tools for tweaking CRT resolutions if any. The discerning would buy Matrox cards for their high quality VGA output and driver settings. I always found I could get a viewable resolution one step higher than usual with a monitor by fine-tuning in the advanced settings. I presume a tool like powerstrip reproduces that functionality?
post #123 of 167
Hey guys, sorry to bring back an old thread but I have the opportunity to pick up the HP version of this monitor ( HP A7217A ) this weekend for $150. does this monitor still preform well with current games in Windows 7? I running an ATI card so will I need to run Powerstrip to run new games in 1920x1200?
post #124 of 167
I've seen 20+ year old CRT monitors that still work and likewise 20+ year old CRT televisions. It's just luck of the draw and how many hours the unit has seen I'd say.
post #125 of 167
Hi

Quote:
Originally Posted by neokeelo View Post

Hey guys, sorry to bring back an old thread but I have the opportunity to pick up the HP version of this monitor ( HP A7217A ) this weekend for $150. does this monitor still preform well with current games in Windows 7? I running an ATI card so will I need to run Powerstrip to run new games in 1920x1200?

I have the GDM-FW900 running as my main monitor with Windows 7 and can assure you: That beast rocks for gaming! Assuming it's in good overall shape of course. You should also have no problems running it at 1920x1200 with 85Hz. If you plan to connect the monitor with BNC cables or run it at 1920x1200@96Hz - that's what I use as desktop/gaming resolution - PowerStrip is highly recommended (I'm not sure how well, if at all, ATI drivers allow you to define custom modes).

Biggest drawback is gamma. The monitor has no gamma correction and the drivers adjustment normaly only works with desktop usage and video playback, not for games. Seccond biggest thing is phosphor lag. Bright objects in front of a dark background leave a visible greenish trail. But that's realy only visible in very dark scenes. Personaly I prefer phosphor lag any day over the sample-and-hold blur LCDs have by design.
post #126 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by BinBash View Post

Biggest drawback is gamma. The monitor has no gamma correction and the drivers adjustment normaly only works with desktop usage and video playback, not for games.

This is specifically what VGA passthrough dongles with gamma correction like Box1021 and GammaX are made for so if was me I'd have a go with one of them.
post #127 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by homerging View Post
I'm a little surprised these CRTs still work well after 8 years usage. My experience with CRT monitors was that they suffered from phospher degradation worse than CRT televisions do; all that high Hz progressive scan white light? I guess you could use something like a GammaX unit for gamma correction if there is no way to correct the source signal for if/when this happens.

I don't know about video cards today but most video cards back in the CRT era did a very poor job at VGA output quality and had very dumbed down tools for tweaking CRT resolutions if any. The discerning would buy Matrox cards for their high quality VGA output and driver settings. I always found I could get a viewable resolution one step higher than usual with a monitor by fine-tuning in the advanced settings. I presume a tool like powerstrip reproduces that functionality?
My FW900 CRT recently quit working but it had an amazing picture all the way to the end, I too was surprised how well the PQ held up over the years, it lasted a total of 8 1/2 years.

From the symptoms it looks like it needs a new flyback transformer to get it going again.

I had no problems with it in Windows 7 & VGA (Nvidia).
post #128 of 167
I dug out an old 14" CRT that hasn't been used for many years. It doesn't work well in progressive mode above 800x600, bring flickery at 1024x768 and 1152x864, and could not sync to 1280x960 at all.

But in interlaced it was a different story.

1280x960? Flicker-free. 1600x1200? Works. I managed to make it sync to something like 1792x1344 before it maxed out.

I can only imagine what a larger monitor could do in interlaced mode and wished I'd thought of it back in the CRT days.
post #129 of 167
Sure you can run some wicked high resolutions in interlaced mode but it's not very practical. Computer monitors are progressive scan for a reason mainly for eye strain / head aches etc. and sharpness of image etc.
post #130 of 167
Hi

Why interlaced? The highest Resolution the GDM-FW900 officially supports (according to spec sheet) is 2304x1440 at 80Hz progressive. In my opinion 1920x1200 at 96Hz progressive is impressive enough. It has "only" 22.5" visible anyway
post #131 of 167
Hi, hope this isn't too much of a bump from the grave but I'm hoping one of you chaps can help me.
I am currently runnugn a gdm fw900 and have done for several years, usually at 2304x1440 on win7 x64.
However every now and then windows decides it's no longer going to recognise the monitor by name and it either becomes genericp&p, generic non p&p, or display device on vga, defaults it to 60hz and makes the maximum possible resolution something like 1900x1200.
Now i've *sometimes* been able to fix it by wiping/reinstalling video drivers (using an ati 5870) but half the time this has no effect whatsoever and it will occasionally fix itself with no way of me knowing what's changed. I've tried installing the specific drivers, which claims to be succesful but with no change to the situation.
The catalyst control centre allows me to go up to some different hz/resolutions but not to my usual one. Is there any way to custom add a resolution to there, or what should I be toying with to fix this once and for all?

Thanks in advance.
post #132 of 167
If anyone is interested in purchasing my GDM-FW900 please email me at petegray5@verizon.net. I don't get on this site very often so some time may elapse before I see this thread again; email is the best way to get in touch with me.
post #133 of 167
I have two of these monitors for sale. Make me an offer. lewis.gushue@gmail.com
post #134 of 167
Post some pictures please. You'll get a lot more bites.
post #135 of 167
I figured this thread was the best place to post since it seems to be the repository for GDM-FW900 issues.

I had this marvelous beast in operation for a good 8 years, 3 in Japan and 5 here in the States. It recently seems to have died. You know, flashed red for a few months, and then one day, nada, nothing, it powers on but just gives a blank screen.

The question is, do I just junk it? :-(

Does anyone know of a service person in the New York area who might know how to fix it? Would anyone be interested in helping, or perhaps taking it off my hands?

I really can't face the idea of just leaving it out on the curb with the trash...

Ideas welcome...
post #136 of 167
When you say flashed red, do u mean the picture flashed red? If so, there are not too many options. One being that the picture tube is shorting the red cathode to heater. This is repairable but usually not worth it. Other option is to replace tube but thats too costly.

The other possibility is a bad video driver for the red gun. I dont know much of the FW900 and dont have access to the service manual, but i can assure you the video driver is a) a video driver IC similar to TDA video drivers found in the DA4 chassis or b) a high-end transistor
Either one of these could be shorting and causing a red flash or having bad solders.


Just giving my thoughts but im not sure... i own a XP37 Xtra and its now 10 years old and still running strong.
Maximum resolution is 2048x1536 @ 60hz and supports 1600x1200@75hz and also 720p@120hz

AND IT HAS 36" VIEWABLE!
post #137 of 167
What is the maximum refresh rate this monitor can do at 2048 x 1536?
post #138 of 167
Between 75 and 80 hz (around 78) for the gdm-fw900, if it can sync to the resolution and most importantly, if your monitor is able to output it. Only some video cards can display 1536p in DVI or HDMI while the resolution is supported by most good video cards in VGA. Anyways, 2048 x 1536 is a 4:3 resolution not a 16:9 resolution.
post #139 of 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shannow View Post

Hi, hope this isn't too much of a bump from the grave but I'm hoping one of you chaps can help me.
I am currently runnugn a gdm fw900 and have done for several years, usually at 2304x1440 on win7 x64.
However every now and then windows decides it's no longer going to recognise the monitor by name and it either becomes genericp&p, generic non p&p, or display device on vga, defaults it to 60hz and makes the maximum possible resolution something like 1900x1200.
Now i've *sometimes* been able to fix it by wiping/reinstalling video drivers (using an ati 5870) but half the time this has no effect whatsoever and it will occasionally fix itself with no way of me knowing what's changed. I've tried installing the specific drivers, which claims to be succesful but with no change to the situation.
The catalyst control centre allows me to go up to some different hz/resolutions but not to my usual one. Is there any way to custom add a resolution to there, or what should I be toying with to fix this once and for all?

Thanks in advance.

I use the FW900. Had it for several years. I had it with an ATI video card and a Nvidia. Under the ATI card I had all kinds of weird trouble like you are having. Then I upgraded my video card and switched to Nvidia. All my headaches vanished, and Win 7 sees the FW900 like it is suppose to. I think if you were to move over to Nvidia your problems would be solved.
post #140 of 167
I have a FW900 (and also a Dell P1110) that both have the infamous green-bias issue. Everything is working fine on these monitors with the exception that there is too much green in the black levels. I turn the brightness down to zero and black still appears as a faded shade of green. I know I can adjust the green bias individually, but if I recall this is caused by a hardware issue, and I would like to keep these monitors up and running as far into the future as possible so I'd rather get to the root of the problem rather than just come up with a temporary solution. On neither one is the brightness so high that I'm stuck seeing retrace lines (as I know has happened on some P991s and perhaps others).

Furthermore, whenever I do the image restoration, the color does go back to looking normal, but the next time I use the monitor, it starts up with the high green bias again. Which leads me to ask, how exactly does the image restoration feature work -- like how does it know what the "correct" colors are supposed to be? Simply adjusting the output voltages alone won't fix the problem if there is a large amount of phosphor wear. I'd rather not have to wait half an hour into using my monitor for getting the correct colors.

When I did adjust the R, G, and B biases individually to get a correct black level, then used the image restoration feature, I ended up with a picture that had black levels that were too purplish, suggesting that the image restoration assumes that the default color settings (9300K, 6500K, sRGB, etc.) are the "correct" ones.

I've read about using WinDAS with a TTL cable to adjust firmware -- can the drives and cuts for each primary color be adjusted independently? And is there a better HARDWARE solution? I'd like to keep both of these monitors (but especially the FW900) alive and well for as long as I can.
post #141 of 167
I'd like to know the answer to that as well.
post #142 of 167
My camera doesn't do this monster justice! It is much more smooth and detalied here (some highlights in the shadows and lights are killed by the camera), and much more dynamic range.

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post #143 of 167
After calibrating multizone convergence my FW900 is running @ 2304x1440p72 and resolves that resolution beautifully! Upscaled 1080p in madVR looks even better now! smile.gif
post #144 of 167
Quote:
How should CRT Monitors be configured?

The key to visual fidelity on high resolution CRT monitors is to use the slowest available pixel clock for a given resolution.


(http://people.csail.mit.edu/jaffer/Gamma/video-bw.html )

...you took it very far ...
post #145 of 167
Wow, you actually posted! Hahaha! That's a very cool link, thanks! I'll try it and take some photos.
post #146 of 167
I still have this monitor for sale if anyone is interested PM me. Thanks.
post #147 of 167
Out of curiosity, whats the highest resolution anyones ever got one of these beasts too?
Ive got my w900 to 2560x1600 on VGA @59Hz
What can the fw900 go to?
post #148 of 167
Anyone from Mass/NH looking to sell one of these?
Edited by demo23019 - 1/15/14 at 11:58am
post #149 of 167
I'm 3.5 hours away from the Mass/NH border in Poughkeepsie, NY. I've got one for sale if you're willing to make the drive.
post #150 of 167
Im actually talking to you through email ATM kind of long drive
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