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The "official" The Onkyo TX-SR706 Owners Thread - Page 95

post #2821 of 2825
For what it's worth, and if not described here earlier (didn't go through all 94 pages of postings here, sorry):

My tx-sr706 lost HDMI completely after about 4 years of flawless operation, no earlier warning signs, just gave up from one day to the next.

All audio was still ok (is going over optical input), though intermittent if a hdmi plug was still inserted in the activated (selected) channel.
I saw several threads of other types of receivers suffering the same, if not intermittent or temperature related, and several mentioning capacitors on the HDMI board.
The intermittent sound (if HDMI plug inserted) together with the posts on other types I saw made me assume the HDMI chips were still ok, and intermittently and briefly recognized the HDMI signals but mostly failed due to too much noise on the boards supply voltages.

What I did to solve it:
Replaced many of the surface mount capacitors with same capacitance "through hole" types (leaded types) 5000H/105°C low ESR, some with slightly higher voltage types.
All runs smooth again.
Be very aware: if not having soldering experience it's very easy to damage the board while removing the smd capacitors!
Also, soldering leaded capacitors on smd pads requires at least soldering experience and a steady hand.
Keep an eye on replacement capacitors diameter, if the replacement is "too fat" it might get difficult to get it on the board next to other parts. That's why I also put the diameters in my listing below (column "dia").
Don't worry about jacket color or things like that, just try and find 105°C low ESR type capacitors. Most manufacturers make them and they cost next to nothing.
I selected 5000H types (5000hours) since by experience it looked about right to me, but I know you can even find 20.000H types too which are of course more expensive.
Selecting 2000H/105°C types will also do the trick just fine, but they may/will fail somewhat sooner in the future.

Keep an open eye on polarity!
The top of the SMD types is blackened on the "minus" side, and leaded capacitors usually have the shortest lead and a fat white or black line on their "minus" side.

Now why didn't I replace SMD capacitors with SMD capacitors?
Simple: when removing the onboard capacitors you'll soon notice the leads for them are mostly UNDER the capacitor, making removal a tedious job and soldering new ones practically impossible.
Using wired types (leaded types) facilitates soldering alot, because you can leave 1-2mm underneath while re-soldering them on the SMD pads.
Make sure you can tilt the capacitors to a flat onboard position afterwards, not to exceed the available space above and especially below the board.

Best tips to give:
- take your time
- use a temperature controlled soldering station
- make sure to take proper precautions with respect to static electricity by grounding the soldering iron to the HDMI-board
- don't stroke the cat while soldering eek.gif

The list of capacitors I replaced:
The 5 first columns is mostly information directly out of the service manual I found on the net some time ago, see link at the end in this post
The only columns of real interest to you are the first column and the last three columns : which capacitor, where is it situated on the HDMI board, what max diameter, and what replacement value I used.
Code:
silkscreen      description     part n°       elco marking     schematicvalue   location   dia(mm) new type
c8602           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           top        5       100uF/10V
c7204           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           top        5       100uF/10V
c7304           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           top        5       100uF/10V
c3302           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           top        5       100uF/10V
c8043           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c3-220-4v       220/4           top        6       220uF/10V
c3477           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c3-220-4v       220/4           top        6       220uF/10V
c7206           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c3-220-4v       220/4           top        6       220uF/10V
c3577           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c3-220-4v       220/4           top        6       220uF/10V
c7306           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c3-220-4v       220/4           top        6       220uF/10V
c8956           UCD1A471MNL1GS  396634717R2     c2-470a-cd      470/10          top        8       470uF/10V
c8957           UCD1A471MNL1GS  396634717R2     c2-470a-cd      470/10          top        8       470uF/10V
c8958           UCD1A471MNL1GS  396634717R2     c2-470a-cd      470/10          top        8       470uF/10V
c8994           UCD1E221MNL1GS  396652217R2     y2-220e-cd      220/25          top        8       220uF/25V
c8995           UCD1E221MNL1GS  396652217R2     y2-220e-cd      220/25          top        8       220uF/25V
c8996           UCD1E221MNL1GS  396652217R2     y2-220e-cd      220/25          top        8       220uF/25V
                                                        
c8041           CEWX16V-100M    398141017R2     c4-100-16v      100/16          bottom     6       100uF/25V
c8024           CEWX16V-100M    398141017R2     c4-100-16v      100/16          bottom     6       100uF/25V
c8021           CEWX16V-100M    398141017R2     c4-100-16v      100/16          bottom     6       100uF/25V
c8328           CEWX16V-22M     398142207R2     c4-22-16v       22/16           bottom     5       22uF/25V
c8675           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8162           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8607           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8609           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8023           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8919           CEWX4V-100M     398141017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c3502           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c3402           CEWX4V-100M     3981G1017R2     c3-100-4v       100/4           bottom     5       100uF/10V
c8443           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c8026           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c8044           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c8605           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c3505           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c3584           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c3405           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c3484           CEWX4V-220M     3981G2217R2     c4-220-4v       220/4           bottom     6       220uF/10V
c8099           CEWX50V-2.2M    398180227R2     y4-2.2-50v      105z            bottom     3       2.2uF/50V

The cost of it all? About 50 dollar alltogether, including shipment (yes, I payed way too much for the components, but I wanted to get them really fast biggrin.gif ).

Replacing them all only took me a couple of hours of intensive work, but taking a whole day pays off if you need it so don't worry about taking your time. Just being very carefull not to damage the HDMI board is the main concern here.
And yes, I did take the trouble of replacing the larger power supply capacitors c8956-c8957-c8958 and c8994-c8995-c8996 just to make sure, since if those aren't good any more then replacing smaller capacitors further down in the circuit will not do the trick to solve any problem whatsoever.

Another thing I noticed:
On the power amplifier cooling fin a small ventilator is mounted, it is connected to connector P4501 on the board just below the HDMI board.
This fan is controlled by the onboard microprocessor and a couple of transistors.
This fan points generally in the right direction to generate at least some air circulation on the HDMI board.
Given the fact the receiver runs fairly hot, and capacitor problems are (too often) caused by running them too hot over long time, it might be a good idea to have the fan run continuously.

This can easily be done by short-circuiting switching transistor Q4502 collector to emitter. The transistor is type 2SA950-Y, data sheets for it are all over internet.
If not sure which transistor pad is what, try and find capacitor C4502, remove it and just connect (short circuit) both pads (C4502 is placed directly over collector-emitter of Q4502)
Q4502 and C4502 are located only few centimeters away from connector P4501, so they should be fairly easy to find.
Or if not willing to run the fan at continuously full speed, try and experiment some by placing a resistor over C4502 until you find the right/acceptable speed for the fan.

The service manuals consist of 2 parts.

The service manual can be downloaded at
part 1
http://www.4shared.com/office/Us6fbaCd/onkyo_tx-sr706_sa706_sm_1_1.html
part 2
http://www.4shared.com/office/DwFUNlX8/onkyo_tx-sr706_sa706_sm_2.html

and

part 1
http://elektrotanya.com/onkyo_tx-sa706_sr706_sm_1.pdf/download.html
part 2
http://elektrotanya.com/onkyo_tx-sa706_sr706_sm_2.pdf/download.html

If the links on this page doesn't work (for instance due to ad-blockers or due to the fact this forum somehow garbles it when calling it), then just copy it as text and paste it in your browser addres line.

greetz
Edited by peter273 - 11/11/13 at 6:00am
post #2822 of 2825

Can some of ya'll help me with a  decision...

 

Our tx sr 706 is at the repair shop (certified & seems like good dudes), they told me the board needed replaced and the cost would run $369.  The replacement board from Onkyo would be better than the original.  Ok so am I better off repairing it or buying a new receiver.  I guess I'm asking is it worth saving at that price?

post #2823 of 2825
^^^Personally I would say it's not worth it. This thing is 5+ years old and was only like $600 back then iirc... You could probably get something equal or maybe even better for that price, especially with black Friday/cyber Monday around the corner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by peter273 View Post


My tx-sr706 lost HDMI completely after about 4 years of flawless operation, no earlier warning signs, just gave up from one day to the next.
Looks like this happened with mine too. I can get it to work by unplugging the hdmi and plugging back in and turning the PS3 off and on a couple times. Huge Bummer as this thing has been going good for quite some time. Luckily I don't really need this avrs hdmi in/out as its only on bedroom duty and I only have one thing to hook in, but still super lame =^/
post #2824 of 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by djPerfectTrip View Post

^^^Personally I would say it's not worth it. This thing is 5+ years old and was only like $600 back then iirc... You could probably get something equal or maybe even better for that price, especially with black Friday/cyber Monday around the corner.

Looks like this happened with mine too. I can get it to work by unplugging the hdmi and plugging back in and turning the PS3 off and on a couple times. Huge Bummer as this thing has been going good for quite some time. Luckily I don't really need this avrs hdmi in/out as its only on bedroom duty and I only have one thing to hook in, but still super lame =^/

Yeah that's how I feel, but I don't have much of an idea how long a repaired unit could go on.  An extra $300 is worth a little effort.  

post #2825 of 2825
My 706 just bit the dust slowly over the last week or so....HDMI inputs began showing "no signal" so I am pretty sure it is the well know HDMI board failure. The only service center in OH. is about 40 miles away.....called them and they said they should be able to replace the board and upgrade the firmware if required for less than $100 so I sent to them today. Will see what they come back with on cost estimate....if more than $250 I will probably have them scrap it and look for a new receiver. As this problem has now become very wide spread I think ONKYO should make an effort to compensate buyers for a obviously flawed design....a rec. that list for $899 MSRP should not be failing in only 4 years in my opinion. Really doubt I will buy ONKYO for my next receiver.
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