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The Descent - 2 different Blu-ray versions CONFIRMED (MPEG-2 vs AVC encoding) - Page 26

post #751 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by wizzack View Post

Anyone know what the video is like on the German disc? I see it has 6.1 DTS HD audio.

If it's the same as the AUS disc I'd love to order it along with Jeepers Creepers from Amazon.

the german one is the vc-1.....
post #752 of 793
Did anyone ever get shots of the UK version?
post #753 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patsfan123 View Post

Did anyone ever get shots of the UK version?

Here's my comparison between the Australian and UK releases:

http://www.landofwhimsy.com/writings...e-descent.html

post #754 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiggles View Post

Here's my comparison between the Australian and UK releases:

http://www.landofwhimsy.com/writings...e-descent.html


Whew! Thanks for the info. I went ahead and ordered the UK version this week.
post #755 of 793
I think the UK version is region locked to B.
post #756 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiggles View Post

Here's my comparison between the Australian and UK releases:

http://www.landofwhimsy.com/writings...e-descent.html


Beautiful encode. I'm going to have to spring for the region free Aus. here sometime soon.
post #757 of 793
Every time I play this movie I'm amazed at the PQ. I wish all BD's looked this good! (UK disc)

That is all.
post #758 of 793
I finally picked up the UK one, glad I waited
post #759 of 793
Did anyone confirm if the UK version is locked?
post #760 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidHir View Post

Did anyone confirm if the UK version is locked?

Unfortunately it is, yes.

If you don't mind having less extras, the Australian version is roughly comparable and region free.
post #761 of 793
Are there any noticeable differences between the dts and pcm tracks?

The aus and uk versions look similar, but the color is slightly different. Does anyone prefer one over the other?
post #762 of 793
So, it's pretty much been two years since Znook found a third, corrected version of this film on blu-ray with accurate color timing, right? Is it finally safe to go to a Target lets say, and find the proper version? Or do you think retailers like that still have the old mpeg-2 version?
post #763 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by mzupeman View Post

So, it's pretty much been two years since Znook found a third, corrected version of this film on blu-ray with accurate color timing, right? Is it finally safe to go to a Target lets say, and find the proper version? Or do you think retailers like that still have the old mpeg-2 version?

No one seems to know. There is a newer version that doesn't have the silver borders on the cover, but besides the new cover I couldn't say whether the disc is any different.
post #764 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomezfan69 View Post

No one seems to know. There is a newer version that doesn't have the silver borders on the cover, but besides the new cover I couldn't say whether the disc is any different.

Interesting. If they did indeed re-introduce a properly color timed AVC encode again, this may be the best bet for finding it. Thanks for that info!
post #765 of 793
So, anyway, I have considered buying this movie for several years now and want to now.

Any confirmation on yet a third encode for the U.S.?
post #766 of 793
Someone has to have bought it. It is probably just a re-press of the MPEG-2 encode.
post #767 of 793
Yeah, I'm not buying this business about a third color-corrected US version for one second. Screencaps and BDinfo or it didn't happen
post #768 of 793
Would someone be able to update the OP with working AVC vs. MPEG case and sticker images? I'd like to figure out if my currently-sealed Descent copy is the AVC version, but the images in the OP aren't available any longer.

If there's more info about a second AVC release (that has replaced the MPEG version), I'd definitely like some details about that as well.
post #769 of 793
Thread Starter 
Sorry, I didn't save those photos after uploading them. If it's still sealed it should be easy to tell based on whether or not the white sticker on the top has a number. If it only has the film's title it's most likely MPEG-2.
post #770 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by msgohan View Post

Sorry, I didn't save those photos after uploading them. If it's still sealed it should be easy to tell based on whether or not the white sticker on the top has a number. If it only has the film's title it's most likely MPEG-2.

No problem at all, thanks for the update about the number on the top sticker. Mine doesn't have the number, thankfully never got around to watching this after buying it last summer
post #771 of 793
Hi,
I know this was a while back but just found this thread. I was the digital colourist on The Descent Part 2 and am surprised to see that there are saturation and contrast differences appearing across regions. I was lead to believe the encoding would only effect compression, and in a small way saturation. What your seeing here may be incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage. Once we've signed off the DCP for digital projection, and the prints,(which we butterfly split screen for sign off with DoP and Director) we tweak the grade on a Sony HD grade 1 monitor and 65" Plasma. This grade then goes to either an Avid DS or Clipster for pan and scan,(2.40,16:9,4:3) and it is when playing out to Sony HDcamSR that the final print emulationRec709 LUT is applied through a Truelight system. I have seen that on KickAss which I graded whilst at Technicolor, that the blacks were slightly lifted. Again possibly due to the incorrect LUT or scaling full to legal being used.
Thanks for the stills by the way. I'll be using them as reference for In Fear which I start grading next week.

Thanks
post #772 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Hi,
I know this was a while back but just found this thread. I was the digital colourist on The Descent Part 2 and am surprised to see that there are saturation and contrast differences appearing across regions. I was lead to believe the encoding would only effect compression, and in a small way saturation. What your seeing here may be incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage. Once we've signed off the DCP for digital projection, and the prints,(which we butterfly split screen for sign off with DoP and Director) we tweak the grade on a Sony HD grade 1 monitor and 65" Plasma. This grade then goes to either an Avid DS or Clipster for pan and scan,(2.40,16:9,4:3) and it is when playing out to Sony HDcamSR that the final print emulationRec709 LUT is applied through a Truelight system. I have seen that on KickAss which I graded whilst at Technicolor, that the blacks were slightly lifted. Again possibly due to the incorrect LUT or scaling full to legal being used.
Thanks for the stills by the way. I'll be using them as reference for In Fear which I start grading next week.
Thanks

Thanks for the great input, what version would you call closest to correct?
post #773 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Hi,
I know this was a while back but just found this thread. I was the digital colourist on The Descent Part 2 and am surprised to see that there are saturation and contrast differences appearing across regions. I was lead to believe the encoding would only effect compression, and in a small way saturation. What your seeing here may be incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage. Once we've signed off the DCP for digital projection, and the prints,(which we butterfly split screen for sign off with DoP and Director) we tweak the grade on a Sony HD grade 1 monitor and 65" Plasma. This grade then goes to either an Avid DS or Clipster for pan and scan,(2.40,16:9,4:3) and it is when playing out to Sony HDcamSR that the final print emulationRec709 LUT is applied through a Truelight system. I have seen that on KickAss which I graded whilst at Technicolor, that the blacks were slightly lifted. Again possibly due to the incorrect LUT or scaling full to legal being used.
Thanks for the stills by the way. I'll be using them as reference for In Fear which I start grading next week.
Thanks
Fascinating to have your input. I was wondering if I could run something by you? When you mention "incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage" could this account for the massive discrepancies seen in the two different versions of this frame:

US disc Australian disc

I admit I know next to nothing about this sort of thing and have no hands on experience, but the differences here -- one version a single wash of red, the other showing multiple different colours -- strike me as being both more extreme and more specific than, say, a blanket increase in contrast or saturation throughout the whole film.
post #774 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Hi,
I know this was a while back but just found this thread. I was the digital colourist on The Descent Part 2 and am surprised to see that there are saturation and contrast differences appearing across regions. I was lead to believe the encoding would only effect compression, and in a small way saturation. What your seeing here may be incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage.
It's relatively common for the same movie to have different color timings/contrast/aspect ratios across regions on Blu-ray, particularly when a film is sold off to different regional distributors. Not every local distributor gets the same source and they will often process the movie differently depending on their equipment. It doesn't happen to movies from the bigger studios who typically own global film rights, but a movie like The Descent was sold off or produced by a number of different companies.
post #775 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom Stranger View Post

It's relatively common for the same movie to have different color timings/contrast/aspect ratios across regions on Blu-ray, particularly when a film is sold off to different regional distributors. Not every local distributor gets the same source and they will often process the movie differently depending on their equipment. It doesn't happen to movies from the bigger studios who typically own global film rights, but a movie like The Descent was sold off or produced by a number of different companies.
While that would be the case in the photochemical era, with different scans from different sources, it's next to non-existent with digital intermediate titles like THE DESCENT, where there is (or at least there should be) a single source with final colour timing.
post #776 of 793
Of all the films I've worked on including Kick Ass, United 93, The Constant Gardener, only Nanny McPhee was mastered for HD by another company, Deluxe/Co3, and the colourist who did a grade pass and applied the rec709 conversion made it brighter than it should have been,(against his better judgement he told me). Even Clash of the Titans, which we did not lay onto HD tape, was rendered with the Rec709 lut in and sent to Warner Bros on a drive as DPX files. The common practice, (as I spent today doing on Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut 'Quartet') is to do a grade pass and render a single version in legal colour space and pass to another department for pan and scan. My guess with Descent 2 is that our old route of applying the lut right at the point of playing to tape might have meant the wrong lut was used. We have a number of luts or colour cubes depending on the original print/lab requirement, so for example a Deluxe-Kodak would look warmer than a Technicolor-Fuji one.
What's odd is that the versions we see here are both 2:35. Any playout as a final version to HD tape should then be cloned from machine to machine. Again this hints at a second incorrect playout from our pan and scan dept.Possibly separate 23.98fps and 25fps playouts for each region. I'd be really interested if anyone has seen similar differences on other films.
Thanks.
post #777 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Of all the films I've worked on including Kick Ass, United 93, The Constant Gardener, only Nanny McPhee was mastered for HD by another company, Deluxe/Co3, and the colourist who did a grade pass and applied the rec709 conversion made it brighter than it should have been,(against his better judgement he told me). Even Clash of the Titans, which we did not lay onto HD tape, was rendered with the Rec709 lut in and sent to Warner Bros on a drive as DPX files. The common practice, (as I spent today doing on Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut 'Quartet') is to do a grade pass and render a single version in legal colour space and pass to another department for pan and scan. My guess with Descent 2 is that our old route of applying the lut right at the point of playing to tape might have meant the wrong lut was used. We have a number of luts or colour cubes depending on the original print/lab requirement, so for example a Deluxe-Kodak would look warmer than a Technicolor-Fuji one.
What's odd is that the versions we see here are both 2:35. Any playout as a final version to HD tape should then be cloned from machine to machine. Again this hints at a second incorrect playout from our pan and scan dept.Possibly separate 23.98fps and 25fps playouts for each region. I'd be really interested if anyone has seen similar differences on other films.
Thanks.

I wish you were here when the Kick Ass thread was active!
post #778 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Of all the films I've worked on including Kick Ass, United 93, The Constant Gardener, only Nanny McPhee was mastered for HD by another company, Deluxe/Co3, and the colourist who did a grade pass and applied the rec709 conversion made it brighter than it should have been,(against his better judgement he told me). Even Clash of the Titans, which we did not lay onto HD tape, was rendered with the Rec709 lut in and sent to Warner Bros on a drive as DPX files. The common practice, (as I spent today doing on Dustin Hoffman's directorial debut 'Quartet') is to do a grade pass and render a single version in legal colour space and pass to another department for pan and scan. My guess with Descent 2 is that our old route of applying the lut right at the point of playing to tape might have meant the wrong lut was used. We have a number of luts or colour cubes depending on the original print/lab requirement, so for example a Deluxe-Kodak would look warmer than a Technicolor-Fuji one.
What's odd is that the versions we see here are both 2:35. Any playout as a final version to HD tape should then be cloned from machine to machine. Again this hints at a second incorrect playout from our pan and scan dept.Possibly separate 23.98fps and 25fps playouts for each region. I'd be really interested if anyone has seen similar differences on other films.
Thanks.
Hey Filmgrader, just a correction: the shots here, and the whole palaver about different colour grades, is for the original THE DESCENT, not the sequel. smile.gif
post #779 of 793
Hi Whiggles,
my mistake. I saw the image of her in the hospital bed and wrongly assumed it was from the start of Part 2. Still i'd be very interested in any other films you guys feel look different fom different regions. It may be something worth pursuing with the distributors, particularly as we spend so much time on the grade.
Thanks
post #780 of 793
Quote:
Originally Posted by Filmgrader View Post

Hi Whiggles,
my mistake. I saw the image of her in the hospital bed and wrongly assumed it was from the start of Part 2. Still i'd be very interested in any other films you guys feel look different fom different regions. It may be something worth pursuing with the distributors, particularly as we spend so much time on the grade.
Thanks
Hey Filmgrader, no worries. The two films do have quite a few shots that are (deliberately so) close to identical.

In answer to your question, no, I can't think of any other DI-sourced title where there are such dramatic differences between different releases. Occasionally you'll see an instance of one release being slightly brighter than the other (for example, most releases of SILENT HILL have noticeably elevated blacks, but the French Blu-ray release doesn't), but I can't remember ever seeing anything like THE DESCENT, where it literally does look like two completely different grades were prepared (at least that's how it looks to me).

Any thoughts about the two captures I posted in one of my previous replies, and whether the massive differences between the two could be explained by, as you described, "incorrect scaling and/or Luts being applied at mastering stage"?

US disc
Australian disc
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