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Welcome to DamnSam77's CEDAR PEAKS Cinema Construction (Denver, Colorado) - Page 2

post #31 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by javadoc View Post

I was toying with this yesterday too, because I need to put a sconce in the window opening, for symetry. Solution: framed over the window! You don't need it for egress anyway, right?

Actually one of the 3 windows is an egress window. I have 3 windows in my basement, two on the left wall, and one on the front wall. I want to block them but I know by code I need to keep the egress window unblocked. Also, I will be treating all walls and covering them with GOM as well, so that should hide any imperfections with the window cover.

So I am thinking of doing one of two things, either coming up with some kind of temporary or removable window panel using drywall and 2x4's (sort of like ChinaDog "Bud" did on his winows) but instead use hinges on one side and a simple slide/mechanism on the other side) this way it says in place.

The other option which is what ChinaDog "Bud" did, which is to make this drywall/stud panel and tape/mud it shut, but I would need to schedule for the final inspection prior to doing so, wait until they leave, and tape/mud the drywall/stud panels.
post #32 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmcveigh View Post

Well it is about time you finally posted your construction thread. At least now I can visualize what you've done after our PM discussions. Good job,

-Ryan

Thanks for the kind words Ryan. You, Oman, and MN_Hookie have been very helpful over the past 3 months, you have answered a lot of questions and definitely influenced my construction planning and execution. So thanks for putting up with all of my novice questions.
post #33 of 275
now you can place your questions here, so all of us other novice builders can learn from the same answers.
post #34 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiahead View Post

now you can place your questions here, so all of us other novice builders can learn from the same answers.

Hey that's how I learned; by cheating off others answers on the other construction threads
post #35 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by damnsam77 View Post

Question about building the riser/stage:


I have seen some people build their risers and stage using pressure treated green wood, and I have seen others use roofing felt at the bottom, and instead use your regular lumber (2x8, 2x10, 2x12..etc).

I really want to avoid the extra expense of buying greenwood. I have a concrete basement, can I simply go with the the regular non-treated 2x10 lumber, use roofing felt at the bottom, and two layers of 1/2" inch or 1" plywood on top?

Since you have apparently done a lot of reading in this forum, you probably have seen people using the u-boat to get their riser off the floor.

They serve several purposes.

1. Get the lumber off the floor so no need to use treated.
2. isolate the riser
3. Help you level (as concrete is rarely flat ) by adjusting the location of the u-boat along the length prevent rocking on uneven concrete.
4. no need for felt paper (which I think reaks!!!)

I did mine a litte different than most by putting 1/2" OBS on the bottom but not on the floor so the insulation would be sealed in and not come in contact with the concrete.

Starts here in my thread

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...0#post14306950

Also I would plan on 2 layers of 3/4" decking sparated by roofing felt (you don't need GG as you are on the basement floor). The second layer really tightens it up. I put one layer on, walked on it then put on the second and you really can tell the difference. (make sure seams don't line up on different layers.).

The cheapest place I could find the u-boats was:

http://sensiblesoundsolutions.com/pr...products_id=36

Looking good. Good luck with the aggressive schedule.

... and yes (holy crap) that is OCD

You don't need Loganed, you need a drink Just don't mix with power tools...
post #36 of 275
Thread Starter 
Thanks Drew, I really am not OCD, lol. But I want the thread to be easy on the eyes, if I were to post everything in one long postm instead of 5 separate ones, no one would even make it past the 2nd paragraph so by breaking it up, it makes it a little more interesting.

I have heard of the u-boat method, but I never got down to looking at it in details. I am gonna have to look into it tonight and make a decision soon. I really wanted to have the riser and most of stage construction finished by Sunday, so I dont know if will be able to squeeze in the u-boat idea. I will look at everything tonight and tomorrow and make a decision soon.
post #37 of 275
So your not a Overly Cool Dude...bummer
post #38 of 275
Doh!
post #39 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

So your not a Overly Cool Dude...bummer

Quote:
Originally Posted by mn_hokie View Post

Doh!


I am not Overly Cool, I am hella kewl! yall are just hella jealous


p.s: you gotta be a south park fan to get a laugh at this...
post #40 of 275
You must be from the west-siyeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeed!!
post #41 of 275
Saw somebody mention recently that they didn't isolate the riser or felt that they needed to because they were not putting bass shakers or buttkickers in the riser. Your plan as it is mine is to put bass shakers into the seats later on, so if need be you can always isolate (rubber pucks or something similar) the seats later on.

I didn't Isolate my riser but it is about a 1/4" -1'2" away from the walls. I built my riser with 2X6's and joist hangers and elevated the front with a 1x4 and back with and 2x4 since my floor was unlevel. Worked out perfectly and has been completely stable.
post #42 of 275
Thread Starter 
I am not planning on putting kickers or bass shakers in the riser, I will definitely put them in each individual seat, which is why I am not gonna even bother with the whole bass port thing that some add to their riser. I am still undecided on the riser situation, I really need to sit down this weekend and draw out a design after I test out the projector, and height from floor to bottom of screen as well as seating location/distance. I may go the u-boat route if needed as long as it doesnt delay the project too much or add a ton of work.
post #43 of 275
The added expense of pressure treated wood shouldn't be that much more. If you're overly concerned about it, just use PT lumber to create the outside shell of your riser. You can then use joist hangars and standard shorter lumber (2x10 joists inside a 2x12 frame, etc) for your joists. The last thing you want is to skimp on the PT lumber and then have to worry about mold issues if you ever get any water in that room.
post #44 of 275
Forgot to mention that my front 1x4 and back 2x4 were PT lumber laid flat. As Jason suggests basically lifted the rest off the ground thus saving the added cost for the rest of the lumber.
post #45 of 275
Thread Starter 
Good idea on using the PT lumber for the frame. I really dont think my basement wikk flood but paying another $10 to get the PT lumber may not be a bad idea. I am not sure what the joist hangars look like....is there a picture or link you can post to show me what they are? I may know what they are but may not know the actual name.
post #46 of 275
http://shop1.mailordercentral.com/ma...es/LUS26SS.jpg

edit: You can see them in use on my thread on the bottom of the 1st page actually.
post #47 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

http://shop1.mailordercentral.com/ma...es/LUS26SS.jpg

edit: You can see them in use on my thread on the bottom of the 1st page actually.

I see, can I find them locally? I am really on a time crunch here...
post #48 of 275
You can get Joist Hangars at any big hardware store such as Home Depot or Lowes. You buy them based on the size of the lumber you're using.
post #49 of 275
Thread Starter 
Excellent! So the 2x10's are not nailed into the riser or stage frame, they are actually just hanging or screwed in the hangers which are screwed into the frame?
post #50 of 275
Assuming you use 2X12s for your perimeter and 2X10's for your joists, here is how it would work.

You would build your permiter from 2x12s. This would rest on the floor. The joist hangars are then nailed or screwed into the 2x10's (one at each end). You line them up so that when you rest the 2x10 in the hangar, the top of the board is level with the top of the 2x12, which keeps it off of the floor. Tha hangars have holes on each side for you to insert screws. This binds the joist to the hangar.
post #51 of 275
Also, if you are planning on stuffing the cavities with insulation and want to keep that off of the ground as well, you can staple a poly tarp under the 2x10s and attach it to the insides of the 2x12s on the end. This will keep the insulation elevated and will probably save you a layer too.
post #52 of 275
Sam, got you PM, will respond when I can.

Bud
post #53 of 275
Sam, the Home Depot's here have them. They are in a section usually one aisle from the screws and bolts, or one from the studs. They are in a section with all kinds of metal peices (hangers, straps, plates). When using them to code, I don't think screws are allowed (I have no idea why). Instead you use nails. If your are using PT lumber, get the glavanized, and the more expensive (thicker) hangers. The PT chemicals will eat through the other stuff.
post #54 of 275
I have always read that it is code to use nails for framing because if there is any shift in a wall or any other sort of framing nails will bend or flex with the shift, where as screws will snap.

Recently though in watching Holmes on Homes every time I see them putting a stud in place I see them using an impact drill with long screws. Not sure if they are purpose made screws.
post #55 of 275
The flipside to that is that nails pop and screws don't. Unless it's a short screw, I would think it would take a helluva lot of shifting to break a screw.

My feeling is that most contractors use nails because it's quicker. I've noticed this especially on fences and decks, where screws take a lot more time, but hold up better in the long run.
post #56 of 275
Where's Javadoc when you need 'em, he can ask his dad.
post #57 of 275
Thread Starter 
I am not sure how inspections and builder codes are normally set. But I didnt think that the stage or riser would be even a part of my inspection. I am probably going to do the final inspection without including the riser or stage. It was not part of the rough inspection and I personally wouldnt think it would matter...its like building a cabinet or a piece of furniture why would they care? All they should care about is framing, drywall, electrical, mechanical, and plumbing.

It seems like using PT wood will just create more unnecessary work. hmmm....if there is water damage I will be honestly more concerned about the carpet, drywall, and my components. I may end up with all standard pine lumber but I will definitly use the joist hangers, thats a great idea. I am still unsure about using the U-Boat or just roofing felt.

Does anyone sell these u-boats locally? even if its more expensive.
post #58 of 275
Not that I have seen, but a lot of folks use hockey pucks instead. That you can find at Wal-mart or a sporting goods store.
post #59 of 275
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Where's Javadoc when you need 'em, he can ask his dad.

What do you need?
post #60 of 275
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Where's Javadoc when you need 'em, he can ask his dad.

Quote:
Originally Posted by javadoc View Post

What do you need?

WHOA Scott!!! That almost had a "genie ina bottle" effect....
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