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What systems are like Kaleidescape, but cheaper? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

What I can't grasp is why more movie nuts with HTPC's don't mind the lack of full disc (i.e. menus and extras)? The draw for many DVD and Bluray collectors traditionally was access to the movie and the extra features. I guess this has changed? If it hasn't changed, why are some many happy to settle on a main movie rip to their HTPC?
It's only lacking for the software you are using. Software players like DVD Fab media player deliver the full BD experience without any restrictions from Cinavia protected titles. HTPC's can be constructed from relatively inexpensive small form-factor boxes that draw their content from a central server farm. The notion of an extender does not apply, you simply replicate the HTPC boxes.
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

Great point Bill. I forgot about all of the warnings and other general crap when viewing a disc in a real player. However, I won't mind the previews as long as they make use of BDLive to always keep the previews fresh and current.

Did you looked into a Dune player and AnyDvd yet?

Im keeping full blurays with most having the previews and warnings removed and those that AnyDvd cant remove I just skip right past because user prohibited operations are removed. Both of those features can be left in tact if you want, and BD Live works also.

Chose your favorite Juke box and be done. If you want to tinker get a HTPC. If you want to set it and forget with full .ISOs get a Dune player and be done.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxrealtor View Post

Did you looked into a Dune player and AnyDvd yet?

Im keeping full blurays with most having the previews and warnings removed and those that AnyDvd cant remove I just skip right past because user prohibited operations are removed. Both of those features can be left in tact if you want, and BD Live works also.

Chose your favorite Juke box and be done.

pdxrealtor, I have AnyDvd right now. I must be missing something in my process. Right now I use AnyDVD HD to unlock the disc and then have ClownBD extract the main movie into "Bluray" folder structure output (SageTV doesn't support Bluray ISO....I believe). The main reason I use ClownBD is that I need to add an extra sound track of downsampled DTS-HD to AC3 for the view tv's in my house which can't do the downsample themselves or don't have a receiver. I could learn to go without the downsampling if I can get the results you do: "keeping full blurays with most having the previews and warnings removed".
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

pdxrealtor, I have AnyDvd right now. I must be missing something in my process. Right now I use AnyDVD HD to unlock the disc and then have ClownBD extract the main movie into "Bluray" folder structure output (SageTV doesn't support Bluray ISO....I believe). The main reason I use ClownBD is that I need to add an extra sound track of downsampled DTS-HD to AC3 for the view tv's in my house which can't do the downsample themselves or don't have a receiver. I could learn to go without the downsampling if I can get the results you do: "keeping full blurays with most having the previews and warnings removed".

AnyDvd, while a very simple tool, has at least for me been a learning experience in itself. Getting to know what all the settings do and how to use them in a way that works best for me has been worth the time spent.

I'm actually re-ripping the few blu-rays I own to include the speedmenu option of AnyDvd. That boots the disc up to a non-java based menu of just the main movie play list, and sometimes a couple extras. The beauty of the speedmenu option is you can keep the original menus with all features and revert to them with one click. wink.gif

Anyways..... did you know AnyDvd will rip the image to disc?
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxrealtor View Post

Did you looked into a Dune player and AnyDvd yet?


Which Dune player would you recommended...looks like the Dune HD Smart D1 is the only option for BD menu playback.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

Which Dune player would you recommended...looks like the Dune HD Smart D1 is the only option for BD menu playback.

That would be the one. There is very limited availability so I would not waste any time. Unless you don't mind hanging out and trying to find used, at a most likely even more inflated price that what the new ones are now selling for.
post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

Which Dune player would you recommended...looks like the Dune HD Smart D1 is the only option for BD menu playback.

So did you buy a Dune player or ???
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxrealtor View Post

So did you buy a Dune player or ???

No, I didn't. I'm, still researching. My SageTV installation (headless server with extenders) is still up and running well enough as to not replace it yet.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheausa View Post

I also had good success with an SD HTPC. I really wanted an HD HTPC to work, but found it far too frustrating and the results did not meet my requirements or expectations. I think in 12 months or so an HTPC will be viable, but right now the software and hardware was not mature enough to work for me.EoRNcT
I tried the PS3 and found it to be the best bang for the buck.. but not adequate for my 800+ hd and sd dvd catalogue. Excellent disc based player, so it's a keeper for me for disc based playback.

Are you talking about HTPC as a disc player? Admittedly none of the PC bluray software packages are as good as they could/should be, but I think you can get a really good experience. I use TMT5 in conjunction with Windows Media Player and media center.
Quote:
Originally Posted by emcdade View Post

Because an HTPC will offer up 99% of the Kaleidescape experience at 1% of the cost. I'm guessing the vast majority of users couldn't care less about the disc menus, and likewise about breaking copy-protection to rip a blu-ray to their home server. There's almost zero market for that type of device.

The market for it doesn't want to worry about an AACS profile not being updated yet, doesn't want to seek out forced subtitles, doesn't care to know about coducs and containers, doesn't want to worry about hard drive failures. I think fiddling and fixing this stuff is fun to do personally but for someone with limited time to enjoy their media the support Kaleidescape provides is really good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Perogi View Post

What I can't grasp is why more movie nuts with HTPC's don't mind the lack of full disc (i.e. menus and extras)? The draw for many DVD and Bluray collectors traditionally was access to the movie and the extra features. I guess this has changed? If it hasn't changed, why are some many happy to settle on a main movie rip to their HTPC?

Depending on the disc I sometimes keep the entire thing. You can do that with TMT5. I use Windows Media Center with Media Browser as my library viewer. When a BDMV folder is played, it launches TMT5's WMC plugin. I've updated the TMT5 interface files to seemlessly match my desktop background, WMC background, and Media Browser splash page. It's as transparent as I can possibly imagine, whether launching an archived film from the hard drive or putting a disc in the pc.

MKV seems to be the main movie rip format of choice. By doing that you are able to bypass previews and warnings and save quit a bit of space. If a big draw of an HTPC is saving money over a similar solution, a part of that will be hard drive space. By eliminating all the extraneous language tracks, subtitles, and other stuff you can save a lot of space.
post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by pittsoccer33 View Post

Are you talking about HTPC as a disc player? Admittedly none of the PC bluray software packages are as good as they could/should be, but I think you can get a really good experience. I use TMT5 in conjunction with Windows Media Player and media center.
The market for it doesn't want to worry about an AACS profile not being updated yet, doesn't want to seek out forced subtitles, doesn't care to know about coducs and containers, doesn't want to worry about hard drive failures. I think fiddling and fixing this stuff is fun to do personally but for someone with limited time to enjoy their media the support Kaleidescape provides is really good.
Depending on the disc I sometimes keep the entire thing. You can do that with TMT5. I use Windows Media Center with Media Browser as my library viewer. When a BDMV folder is played, it launches TMT5's WMC plugin. I've updated the TMT5 interface files to seemlessly match my desktop background, WMC background, and Media Browser splash page. It's as transparent as I can possibly imagine, whether launching an archived film from the hard drive or putting a disc in the pc.

MKV seems to be the main movie rip format of choice. By doing that you are able to bypass previews and warnings and save quit a bit of space. If a big draw of an HTPC is saving money over a similar solution, a part of that will be hard drive space. By eliminating all the extraneous language tracks, subtitles, and other stuff you can save a lot of space.

My point isn't that HTPC's are on equal footing, it's that there are no real Kaleidescape competitors because there is next to no market for it. I know plenty of wealthy people who would laugh at the notion of paying $40,000 for a movie player. I guess time will tell if the Kaleidescape people can keep the lights on.
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