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Who are the greatest guitarists of all time? - Page 3

post #61 of 319
Rory Gallagher one of the finest blues-rock guitarists of our time. Listen to the Irish tour album.
post #62 of 319
Jimi Hendrix.

His pioneering use of feedback, pedals (did you know that Kramer invented the flange effect just for him?), and the amazing amount of soul that he poured into his playing make him a no brainer choice for best ever in my opinion. Sure guys like Clapton and Beck were greatly expanding the musical possibilities of electric guitar before him, but he really took innovation to a whole new level while managing to keep a very strong connection to the blues guitarists that came before him.

He really was the first shredder and everyone that came after him, as well as his contemporaries like Clapton and Page owe him a huge debt.

Some of my other favorites:
Carlos Santana
David Gilmour
Jerry Garcia
Jimmy Page

I'm not a huge jazzhead but John McLaughlin and Django Reinhardt are both incredible as well.

As for guys in the last twenty years, I would throw out:
Jerry Cantrell
Trey Anastasio
Johnny Greenwood
post #63 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulwozniak View Post

Let me add that Clapton played with Beck in the Yardbirds, and Beck played with Page also in the Yardbirds, pre-dating your great guitar duo's. Allman and Clapton were together in Derek and the Domino's - "Layla and other great love songs".


Wow! I just started reading this thread for the first time. I was at the concert in Pittsburgh where Eric Clapton did not show up to play lead for the Yardbirds and Jeff Beck (who I heard was actually the bass player) stepped in to play lead on stage with Jimmy Page. I was pretty young at the time and remember the story, but don't really remember the concert, and that was way before any of us were doing drugs.

Now as I got older and got the very good equipment and went to many more concerts in the 70' we would often have discussions on who is the best. Hendrix was always mentioned by very few thought he was actually the best. I have not finished reading this whole thread yet, but some of the ones I have not seen mentioned yet that would always be brought up in our conversations and listening were:

Alvin Lee of Ten Years After - I recently bought the CD version of "A Space in Time" still think he is one of the best.

Mick Ronson - Ziggy Played Guitar - Need I say more? I believe he also backed up Lou Reed on Rock N Roll Animal. Did some solo stuff too that I liked.

I have to admit though my favorite was always Steve Howe when listening at home or live in concert or David Gilmour. Very hard for me to choose between them.

Some others Greg Lake of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, but more live in concert than recorded.

And Neil Young when I saw him with Crosby, Still and Nash. He is just plain crazy and you can not help but get into his live performance when he is on his game. Other times though he just did not impress me.
post #64 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhouseman View Post

I like to suggest great guitarists that define the sound of their bands without a great abundance of solo's

The Edge
Keith Richards
Peter Townsend
Malcolm Young


On this reasoning I would suggest Kurt Cobain. I'm surprised he isn't on the top 100 list. Also, Slash, although he does do more solos.

My favorite though is Kirk Hammett, mostly because it is my favorite music/band. These 3 are involved in some of the most listenable/seminal albums ever made (Nevermind, Appetite for Destruction, Master of Puppets).
post #65 of 319
A couple others to consider:


Robert Fripp
Jerry Garcia
Mark Knopfler
Henry Kaiser
Mike Oldfield ( well the work is interesting and he is a guitarist...)
post #66 of 319
Another great guitarrist IMO
Ronnie Earl
post #67 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimKW View Post

Wow! I just started reading this thread for the first time. I was at the concert in Pittsburgh where Eric Clapton did not show up to play lead for the Yardbirds and Jeff Beck (who I heard was actually the bass player) stepped in to play lead on stage with Jimmy Page. I was pretty young at the time and remember the story, but don't really remember the concert, and that was way before any of us were doing drugs.

Now as I got older and got the very good equipment and went to many more concerts in the 70' we would often have discussions on who is the best. Hendrix was always mentioned by very few thought he was actually the best. I have not finished reading this whole thread yet, but some of the ones I have not seen mentioned yet that would always be brought up in our conversations and listening were:

Alvin Lee of Ten Years After - I recently bought the CD version of "A Space in Time" still think he is one of the best.

Mick Ronson - Ziggy Played Guitar - Need I say more? I believe he also backed up Lou Reed on Rock N Roll Animal. Did some solo stuff too that I liked.

I have to admit though my favorite was always Steve Howe when listening at home or live in concert or David Gilmour. Very hard for me to choose between them.

Some others Greg Lake of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, but more live in concert than recorded.

And Neil Young when I saw him with Crosby, Still and Nash. He is just plain crazy and you can not help but get into his live performance when he is on his game. Other times though he just did not impress me.

For whatever its worth the guitar players on Lou Reed Rock and Roll Animal were Steve Hunter (renowned studio musician) and Dick Wagner who later had success as Alice Coopers lead guitarist, bandleader and co-writer during the Welcome to My Nightmare era. Their intro to Sweet Jane is generally regarded as a classic. For those interested, You Tube has several great video's of this particular song, especially in Rock and Roll Animal 1. Enjoy
post #68 of 319
Another that does not get recognized for his guitar skills very much is Vince Gill. I went to see him once and was stunned to learn what he could do with a guitar. The mention of Rory Gallagher by MickB deserves consideration as well. Fine work.
post #69 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenhouseman View Post

For whatever its worth the guitar players on Lou Reed Rock and Roll Animal were Steve Hunter (renowned studio musician) and Dick Wagner who later had success as Alice Coopers lead guitarist, bandleader and co-writer during the Welcome to My Nightmare era. Their intro to Sweet Jane is generally regarded as a classic. For those interested, You Tube has several great video's of this particular song, especially in Rock and Roll Animal 1. Enjoy

Thanks for the clafification. I tried buying a copy of Rock N Roll animal on CD, but the sound was so bad I just tossed it. I remember really enjoying the vinyl copy though.
post #70 of 319
To add to the "non-shredder" players talk - players in the vein of The Edge, Andy Summers, Alex Lifeson, et al....I'll also throw into that room Adam Jones of Tool.

To me, he is the prog-metal (if you want to call Tool that) version of Andy Summers. Certainly comfortable hiding in the mix to add texture, while the drums/bass do all the deafening, Satanic heavy lifting . But can certainly douse you w/ buckets of Sabbath-approved metal sludge, too. Jones has some of the most interesting gtr parts (IMO) I hear these days.

To me, a couple of other underappreciated players in that particular "atmospheric" mode of playing are Robert Smith (the Cure) & Daniel Ash (Bauhaus/Love & Rockets).

As a player, I have gotten just as much inspiration from those guys as I have from Hendrix, Beck, VH, etc.
post #71 of 319
IN the blues realm, I can say that I have had the honor of playing with a British blues MONSTER named Martin Pugh. He was the guitarist for British band Steamhammer & later went on to play w/ Rod Stewart & the Faces for some time. He later moved to the US & settled in central CA (my neck of the woods) & plays frequently w/ a local blues artist, "Steamin'" Stan Ruffo. The man has serious Brit blues chops for days. And builds some very sweet eletric guitars, too.

Plus it's cool to say I know a guy who knows Rod Stewart & is still in friendly contact - last I heard - w/ Ronnie Wood
post #72 of 319
Definitely Clapton, Hendrix, and Page are on the top of the list. Stevie Ray, maybe, if he had lived longer
post #73 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodrigues_Brazil View Post

Another great guitarrist IMO
Ronnie Earl

Seeing that pic made me thought of a potentially very funny sideliner...

Best Guitar face!

Here's a couple that I found. (seems to go hand in hand with the great players)







post #74 of 319
In the category of Blues Guitarist, I can't believe nobody has mentioned Roy Buchanan. Best damn pure Blues player I've ever seen.

For acoustic, Leo Kotke deserves high mention.

My personal all around favorite chops man was Duane Allman. Love the sound he made with a guitar and a Coriciden bottle (slide).
post #75 of 319
rarely mentioned greats -

Joe Walsh
Daryl Stuermer
Frank Gambale
Steve Hackett
post #76 of 319
steve lukather if he hasn't been mentioned
post #77 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by funkmonkey View Post

Seeing that pic made me thought of a potentially very funny sideliner...

Best Guitar face!

Here's a couple that I found. (seems to go hand in hand with the great players)








Oh, man - you've definitely gotta throw Robin Trower, Jimmy Page and Carlos Santana in there, too.

But the all-time best was Zal Cleminson of the Sensational Alex Harvey Band, back when he used to wear the pierrot white-face makeup.
post #78 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denophile View Post

unequivocally:

1) Satriani
2 Stevie ray vaughn
3) the lead guitarist for metallica (forget his name)
4) slash
5) absolutely NO ONE in the last 20 years

My top two are SRV and Gilmour but over the last 20 years I would have to say Jonny Greenwood from Radiohead. I have played guitar for 20 years and the things that Greenwood does to push his instrument to the limits boggles my mind. Greenwoods use of synths and effects is done so well that it must be respected. Remember, a lot of people thought that Hendrix was not "playing a guitar" and that he was just making noise with it.
post #79 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

No - Hendrix was playing it. And feeling it, too.

Eddie Van Halen just makes noise with it - or is at least showing off "tricks" he can do on it much of the time. He's the guitarist version of Mariah Carey - all flash,"technique", and showing off, and not so much substance or real feeling. In other words, making it appear as if they're better than they really are.

I'd like to see Van Halen equal what Hendrix can do live - most of his sound is "studio-ized".

I never said that I didnt think Hendrix was playing it, just making a refrence that a lot of music is not really understood til later generations hear it.
post #80 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyacro View Post

I never said that I didnt think Hendrix was playing it, just making a refrence that a lot of music is not really understood til later generations hear it.

I know - I was just making a statement. Not so much towards your post, but just that I consider EVH overrated by a lot of people. His situation is more the opposite - I doubt if people will consider him so "great" 30 years from now.

I wish we had some kind of criteria established here. The title is "greatest" guitarist, but it seems to have become a "who is the most important at shaping their band's sound" thread.

I still think that when it comes to greatest, The Edge doesn't even belong in there. But if you're changing it to "shaping the band's sound", then I guess he would - even though I think their rhythm section is just as important, if not moreso (listen to "New Year's Day" or "Sunday Bloody Sunday" closely sometime - the whole "War" album, actually. Don't go by "The Joshua Tree, where all the drummer's doing is going "thump, thump, thump" on the bass drum through the whole thing).
post #81 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

I know - I was just making a statement. Not so much towards your post, but just that I consider EVH overrated by a lot of people.

I wish we had some kind of criteria established here. The title is "greatest" guitarist, but it seems to have become a "who is the most important at shaping their band's sound" thread.

I agree but one thing about great guitar players is a distinct sound. The band will follow that sound, so in a way the best guitarist would be the most important in shaping a bands sound. I think SRV was the best ever. You could replace his band with any two players that can keep time
and he would sound just as good. The underlying things with SRV like the size strings he played with and playing so hard that he had to have bass frets put on his board are some things a lot of people dont know. So if I had to go with 1 player it would be SRV, no doubt about it.
post #82 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyacro View Post

I agree but one thing about great guitar players is a distinct sound. The band will follow that sound, so in a way the best guitarist would be the most important in shaping a bands sound. I think SRV was the best ever. You could replace his band with any two players that can keep time
and he would sound just as good. The underlying things with SRV like the size strings he played with and playing so hard that he had to have bass frets put on his board are some things a lot of people dont know. So if I had to go with 1 player it would be SRV, no doubt about it.

Well, it started out as more of an "influence" thing. I would think that would be more like what historically "great" would mean.

The poster who mentioned guys like Robert Johnson, Chuck Berry and B.B. King actually had the truest post.

I mean, Joe Satriani "greater" than Jimi Hendrix? C'mon!
post #83 of 319
There are many great guitarists. Part of being great is the ability to play in different contexts in different situations and become part of the music. Part of it is creating a new context, a presence that others end up trying to duplicate. SRV, Robert Johnson,Hendrix, Emmanuel, Atkins...all had obvious influences, but created their own brand, so to speak.
post #84 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

Well, it started out as more of an "influence" thing. I would think that would be more like what historically "great" would mean.

The poster who mentioned guys like Robert Johnson, Chuck Berry and B.B. King actually had the truest post.

I mean, Joe Satriani "greater" than Jimi Hendrix? C'mon!

I agree 100%, Satriani though tech. excellent is cold compared to Hendrix or SRV. Shredding was never my thing because it seems to have no emotion.
post #85 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye3.1 View Post

In the category of Blues Guitarist, I can't believe nobody has mentioned Roy Buchanan. Best damn pure Blues player I've ever seen.

I did in the post #47
and Steve Hackett as well
post #86 of 319
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbyacro View Post

I agree 100%, Satriani though tech. excellent is cold compared to Hendrix or SRV. Shredding was never my thing because it seems to have no emotion.

Maybe you can answer this for me -

Just what is it that makes Jeff Beck such a "legendary, great" guitarist? I mean, to me he's always been a decent guitarist, but I could never understand the Godlike status bestowed on him by so many. There are hundreds of other well-known guitarists I've heard that I would consider "better" in every way. To me, his claim to fame has more to do with who he surrounds himself with, his wise choice of material, and his ego more than anything else.

I just want to hear a guitarist's opinion.
post #87 of 319
Same for Clapton, IMO. A great guitarist and a real journeyman type, but there are many with his talent and creativity.
post #88 of 319
Quote:


Mick Ronson - Ziggy Played Guitar - Need I say more? I believe he also backed up Lou Reed on Rock N Roll Animal. Did some solo stuff too that I liked.

He also played and arranged on Transformer.


Quote:


Just what is it that makes Jeff Beck such a "legendary, great" guitarist? I mean, to me he's always been a decent guitarist, but I could never understand the Godlike status bestowed on him by so many. There are hundreds of other well-known guitarists I've heard that I would consider "better" in every way. To me, his claim to fame has more to do with who he surrounds himself with, his wise choice of material, and his ego more than anything else.

At one time he did some amazing stuff. Blow by Blow is some really great guitar work. But a lot of what I've seen of him in recent years seems to be just kind of noodling.
post #89 of 319
Yeah, Blow by Blow, Wired and There and Back are all personal Fusion favorites of mine.

Having Jan Hammer around for them sure didn't hurt things any.
post #90 of 319
Putting the 'Edge' in the same thread even with Alex Lifeson is insulting. The chicks in the band Iron Maidens are better than the 'Edge'.

Pay attention.

Jimi Hendrix
Stevie Ray Vaughn
Yngwie J. Malmsteen

What do they all have in common? Jimi Hendrix.

And, everybody younger than 40 plays guitar because of Eddie Van Halen.

out.
jp
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