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software convert 720p to 1080p movies

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
how to convert 720p to 1080p? and not 1080p to 720p? is there any software that can convert 720p to 1080p?
post #2 of 16
Ffdshow
post #3 of 16
What do you mean by "convert" ? Re-encode a 720p video to 1080p or scale the video when playing?

If you mean scale it's done automatically by all players (and ffdshow if you want).

If you mean re-encode to produce a 1080p file from a 720p one, it's useless and there's absolutely no reason to do that.
post #4 of 16
Why would it be useless? I'm looking to do the same thing. I have 90% of the footage i'm using at 1080 but some is shot at 720. I need to have it match the other footage and thus, render to 1080.
post #5 of 16
Final Cut Pro will do it. Put your footage into Compressor, and go to "advanced format conversion," there are a number of presets there.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by corydzbinski View Post

Why would it be useless? I'm looking to do the same thing. I have 90% of the footage i'm using at 1080 but some is shot at 720. I need to have it match the other footage and thus, render to 1080.

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte View Post

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.

+1...agreed.
post #8 of 16
+2 agreed. No point in doing it.

Peter
post #9 of 16
720p for my reason listed above. All you're doing is wasting hard drive space making it 1080p. You'll see no benefit in the image quality encoding a 720p source to 1080p. Your player should upconvert the 720p to 1080 for you.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick0725 View Post

1280x720P 50 fps PAL and converting to BLU ray NTSC. I have just finished authoring and am stuck on how to output the files...in which format. I prefer 1080 over 720.

should I

1080P 29.97 fps
1080I 29.97 fps
720P I would like to avoid but would consider if you have a good explaination for using it.

I would like to direct you to jrwalte's post:
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte View Post

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.

Seriously, I'd think that's all the argument people will need. Even if you encode to 1080p (don't bother with 1080i, it'll be a nightmare to encode), all you're doing is increasing the file size without increasing picture quality. You might even be doing yourself a disservice as your Blu-ray player or HDTV will likely do a much better job upconverting your 720p source to 1080i/p than encoding it to 1080i/p yourself.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte View Post

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.


Check out Magic Bullet's instant HD. It does some amazing stuff, even with SD video to HD. Goes to show you that not everything is as it seems and things come about that we aren't aware of without a little research. I started using this over the weekend and it gives amazing results.

redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-instant-hd
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte View Post

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.


Check out Magic Bullet's instant HD. It does some amazing stuff, even with SD video to HD. Goes to show you that not everything is as it seems and things come about that we aren't aware of without a little research. I started using this over the weekend and it gives amazing results.

redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-instant-hd
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by corydzbinski View Post

Check out Magic Bullet's instant HD. It does some amazing stuff, even with SD video to HD. Goes to show you that not everything is as it seems and things come about that we aren't aware of without a little research. I started using this over the weekend and it gives amazing results.

redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-instant-hd

it's the exact same thing as using a good program to upscale and enhance the original SD video in real-time, and with advanced FFDShow tweaks with a good CPU, it's free and probably better. So why waste storage space for something that can be done in real-time?
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by corydzbinski View Post

Check out Magic Bullet's instant HD. It does some amazing stuff, even with SD video to HD. Goes to show you that not everything is as it seems and things come about that we aren't aware of without a little research. I started using this over the weekend and it gives amazing results.

redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/magic-bullet-instant-hd

It doesn't matter what you use. If the file format is 720p then it does not have the info that is required to produce a true 1080p picture. Somewhere, you have to fill in the missing info. It makes 0 sense (nonsense) to create a 1080p file from 720p hoping to get a better picture. You just end up with a bigger file. As already stated, just let either the playback software or the display do it real-time.

It's the same as thinking an upscaling DVD player is giving you a true 1080p HD experience. Not!

Peter
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte View Post

Because you'd be taking that much more HD space for 'empty' video content. No software can make something out of nothing and you'd be increasing your video size file for nothing. It would be like taking a 128bit MP3 and re-encoding it to 256bit. In fact, you'll lose a little bit of quality when you re-encode from 720p to 1080p. Unless you are transcoding in the original format or a lossless format, you will always lose a little bit of the original when encoding and re-encoding what has already been encoded.

Let the decoding software/hardware upscale the 720 to 1080 for you real-time as you watch it. It will do just as good of a job, if not better.

Someone said they had 90% of their video as a 1080 source and needed to add a little of the 720 source so they wanted to convert the 720 to 1080 so it would all match. That's also what I am trying to do, doesn't the entire video need to be the same resolution in order to make it one video file?

I'm converting an event that had 4 camcorders recording it, two 1080 and two 720. The 1080 were for high resolution close up shots where the 720 were mostly used for wide angle crowd scenes. I think I'd rather convert the 720 to 1080 then the other way around.

Sorry I know this is an older thread but when I google'd "convert 720p video to 1080p" this is one of the first things that pop'd up.
http://www.google.com/search?q=conve...video+to+1080p
post #16 of 16
Since it sounds like you are going to be assembling the video using a Video editor of some sort, like Sony Vegas Pro let's say, then the answer is... no...you don't need to pre-upscale the video. Just setup your video project as you would if all the video source files were the same resolution, in other words don't even think about it. Just drop in and edit without thinking about resolution of the source.

When you output the video editing program will create the final video in whatever format you designate, 1080p for example, performing the upscaling on the 720p content as necessary.

Don't waste time or space upscaling the 720p content. First off you are applying an unnecessary compression pass against the source (and the source will ALWAYS be better than reconversions. Secondly the video editing program can do the upscaling from the source format (720p).

In general keep this rule in mind. For the best results when editing don't modify the source. Keep it in it's native format, and resolution, and create your final video in the editing program. Now there are always exceptions, for example if you use a crap editing program, but since I assume you won't be the rule applies
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