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Netflix streaming quality - Page 106

post #3151 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

I've noticed in the past few days that sometimes you have to stop the title and press resume it to get it to play SuperHD. On more than one occasion the test file was going up to 3000kbps and staying there. Stopping and resuming it took it to 5800kbps pretty quick.

Another problem I noticed is the audio. The 5.1 stream is of terribly quality. Anything that is rather high frequency, like the letter S in speech, hi hats or equivalent in music, etc, has this horrible compression noise that is very noticeable, especially when using headphones. Switching to the stereo stream is the only way to go from awful sound to mediocre sound quality, which at least doesn't have that compression noise. I'm guessing these must be at best 128 kbps or even 96 kbps streams. The only problem here is that the Netflix interface in the Sony BDP-S5100, as good as it is, doesn't have a default setting for this, so each title starts in 5.1 by default, and you have to go through the sub menu before you start playing the title to make the change. This is the only thing in which the Roku is better, because it has a choice in the main settings, so each title can start playing in stereo by default if you choose.

I know that is what the Roku used to do and most people disliked it. They finally chnaged it so it would default to 5.1. The audio from most streaming services sounds overly compressed. Of course some titles are worse than others.
post #3152 of 5439
No problem here watching the final episode of "Derek" in SuperHD and the Canadian Sci-fi two part movie "Delete" in SuperHD in prime time. It did notice on the latter that a few scenes dropped down to a low resolution for a couple seconds then back up. I'm not getting 5.1 though but that might be due to the setting on the AV Receiver which I need to check.
post #3153 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

No problem here watching the final episode of "Derek" in SuperHD and the Canadian Sci-fi two part movie "Delete" in SuperHD in prime time. It did notice on the latter that a few scenes dropped down to a low resolution for a couple seconds then back up. I'm not getting 5.1 though but that might be due to the setting on the AV Receiver which I need to check.

I assume you are continuing to use the Chromecast.

In this case yes you should get 5.1 if available on that title. I get DD+ from my Chromcast plugged into my AVR compared to DD on my Apple TV - both on Netflix.
post #3154 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

Another problem I noticed is the audio. The 5.1 stream is of terribly quality. Anything that is rather high frequency, like the letter S in speech, hi hats or equivalent in music, etc, has this horrible compression noise that is very noticeable, especially when using headphones. Switching to the stereo stream is the only way to go from awful sound to mediocre sound quality, which at least doesn't have that compression noise. I'm guessing these must be at best 128 kbps or even 96 kbps streams.

Netflix digital surround sound is 384 Kbps DD+, which has the potential to sound like basic DD at twice the bit rate. It always sounds great to me and I haven't heard anyone else complain about it.
Quote:
The only problem here is that the Netflix interface in the Sony BDP-S5100, as good as it is, doesn't have a default setting for this, so each title starts in 5.1 by default, and you have to go through the sub menu before you start playing the title to make the change. This is the only thing in which the Roku is better, because it has a choice in the main settings, so each title can start playing in stereo by default if you choose.

The S5100 is probably defaulting to 5.1 because it can see in the E-EDID block returned by your AVR that it can handle either DD+ or at least basic DD, which the BDP can convert DD+ into. If it's doing that conversion the fidelity of the sound will be compromised. When the Xbox 360 and PS3 do it the sound is noticeably less vibrant.

Roku used to default to stereo because it cannot convert DD+ into anything else and they can't be at all certain that their output is being run to something which supports DD+ (well, they could, but they choose not to examine the E-EDID block). This was pretty unsatisfying for those of us with AVRs which can decode DD+; it was frustrating to have to remember to enable it for every title. Their solution was to make the setting "sticky". If you ever choose English DD+ sound for any title then English DD+ sound will be the default for every title which has it until you choose stereo for such a title. The same "stickiness" is in effect for subtitles/captions.

If I had as many complaints about Netflix as you do I think that I'd throw up my hands and stop using it.
post #3155 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Netflix digital surround sound is 384 Kbps DD+, which has the potential to sound like basic DD at twice the bit rate. It always sounds great to me and I haven't heard anyone else complain about it.
The S5100 is probably defaulting to 5.1 because it can see in the E-EDID block returned by your AVR that it can handle either DD+ or at least basic DD, which the BDP can convert DD+ into. If it's doing that conversion the fidelity of the sound will be compromised. When the Xbox 360 and PS3 do it the sound is noticeably less vibrant.

Roku used to default to stereo because it cannot convert DD+ into anything else and they can't be at all certain that their output is being run to something which supports DD+ (well, they could, but they choose not to examine the E-EDID block). This was pretty unsatisfying for those of us with AVRs which can decode DD+; it was frustrating to have to remember to enable it for every title. Their solution was to make the setting "sticky". If you ever choose English DD+ sound for any title then English DD+ sound will be the default for every title which has it until you choose stereo for such a title. The same "stickiness" is in effect for subtitles/captions.

If I had as many complaints about Netflix as you do I think that I'd throw up my hands and stop using it.

I don't think either the Blu-ray player or the Roku in my case are converting to anything. With either of them, the display on my receiver says Dolby Digital Plus.

I may think that Netflix's service is really mediocre or downright terrible at times, but at $12 or so a month it's still a good value, as long as you don't use it on a Roku. Other than the audio problem (which is not noticeable all the time), it's not too bad with the BDP-S5100. It's nowhere as good as Vudu, but at least I can enjoy a movie without the quality switching back and forth all the time.
post #3156 of 5439
I found the perfect title to show you all what I'm talking about. Check Breaking Bad, Season 3 Ep 12 "Half Measures", starting around 9:30. It's a scene where Walt and Jesse are at a bar and they whisper most of the time, so this compression noise is very evident, because there's a lot of long Sssss. Unless your receiver it set to an EQ curve with almost muted highs, you will hear it. Then switch to stereo and you will see that the sound is much better. I didn't realize how bad the Netflix 5.1 track was until I was so fed up with the streaming problems that I signed up for the month free trial for their DVD service to get the rest of Breaking Bad on Blu-ray, and the difference is night and day. The Netflix 5.1 audio quality is absolutely horrible, and the stereo one is mediocre but tolerable. Of course if you're using a laptop or cheap computer desk speakers, most likely you will not notice any of this.
post #3157 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

I found the perfect title to show you all what I'm talking about. Check Breaking Bad, Season 3 Ep 12 "Half Measures", starting around 9:30. It's a scene where Walt and Jesse are at a bar and they whisper most of the time, so this compression noise is very evident, because there's a lot of long Sssss. Unless your receiver it set to an EQ curve with almost muted highs, you will hear it. Then switch to stereo and you will see that the sound is much better. I didn't realize how bad the Netflix 5.1 track was until I was so fed up with the streaming problems that I signed up for the month free trial for their DVD service to get the rest of Breaking Bad on Blu-ray, and the difference is night and day. The Netflix 5.1 audio quality is absolutely horrible, and the stereo one is mediocre but tolerable. Of course if you're using a laptop or cheap computer desk speakers, most likely you will not notice any of this.

Listening through decent speakers as processed by my Onkyo TX-NR515 I tried that sequence as played on my Roku 3, WD TV Live, Panasonic BDT220 and the Win8 Netflix app on this PC; it sounded fine on all of them (they should all have delivered exactly the same bits for sound). I heard no discernible difference in that dialog between the 384 Kbps DD+ 5.1 track and the 192 Kbps stereo track; the 64 Kbps stereo track from the Win8 app was a bit flatter.

Again, no one else has voiced this complaint and there are many people participating in these discussions using quite high end audio equipment. If your problem was at all common we'd have heard about it by now. (There'd no doubt be an active thread complaining about it). Millions of people are using Rokus to view Netflix with no reason to complain, including myself. For me the video bit rate always ramps up quickly and is rock-solid stable. You should stop generalizing your statements about your personal experiences.
post #3158 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Listening through decent speakers as processed by my Onkyo TX-NR515 I tried that sequence as played on my Roku 3, WD TV Live, Panasonic BDT220 and the Win8 Netflix app on this PC; it sounded fine on all of them (they should all have delivered exactly the same bits for sound). I heard no discernible difference in that dialog between the 384 Kbps DD+ 5.1 track and the 192 Kbps stereo track; the 64 Kbps stereo track from the Win8 app was a bit flatter.

Again, no one else has voiced this complaint and there are many people participating in these discussions using quite high end audio equipment. If your problem was at all common we'd have heard about it by now. (There'd no doubt be an active thread complaining about it). Millions of people are using Rokus to view Netflix with no reason to complain, including myself. For me the video bit rate always ramps up quickly and is rock-solid stable. You should stop generalizing your statements about your personal experiences.

If you think I don't have a right to complain about Netflix's poor service quality you are very mistaken. That it works fine for you doesn't mean it works the same for everybody, especially when there are several people here who share my point of view, at least when it comes to the video streaming, and apparently I have better hearing than most so I'm able to hear a very obvious compression artifact, which is not a fault with the technology itself, Dolby Digital is very good technology if it's not compressed to such a ridiculously low bitrate. 384 kbps is decent for stereo, even less than that, but not for 5 full channels and 1 LFE channel.

After all, if this poor compression quality was my imagination, or my equipment, I would hear it in all the streams including those of Vudu and Amazon, and I don't. But I'd be willing to bet that many of the people who listen with attention to the sequence of Breaking Bad I mentioned will hear this horrible quality audio. Especially if they have the Blu-rays or even the DVDs to compare it to.
Edited by Sebaz - 10/14/13 at 5:24pm
post #3159 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

If you think I don't have a right to complain about Netflix's poor service quality you are very mistaken. That it works fine for you doesn't mean it works the same for everybody, especially when there are several people here who share my point of view, at least when it comes to the video streaming, and apparently I have better hearing than most so I'm able to hear a very obvious compression artifact, which is not a fault with the technology itself, Dolby Digital is very good technology if it's not compressed to such a ridiculously low bitrate. 384 kbps is decent for stereo, even less than that, but not for 5 full channels and 1 LFE channel.

I do not deny your right to complain about Netflix, I'm just stating that you can't honestly issue blanket statement like, "Netflix 5.1 audio quality is absolutely horrible, and the stereo one is mediocre but tolerable" and "it's still a good value, as long as you don't use it on a Roku" since they're just not true for anywhere near everyone; my guess is that it's not true for any significant percentage of Netflix customers. Find me one other posts in these forums complaining about Netflix surround sound quality. If your hearing is so much finer than everyone else's that's not Netflix's fault.

DD+ is touted by Dolby as being twice as efficient as basic DD; more bang for the bit is why Dolby pitches it for use by streaming services. 384 Kbps should always be superior to the quality of the 448 Kbps basic DD typical of 5.1 soundtracks on DVDs; TV surround tracks use basic DD at similar bit rates. It's certainly no competition for the lossless formats used on BDs, the Netflix experience isn't in competition with that. I believe that VUDU uses DD+ encoded at similar rates..
post #3160 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

If you think I don't have a right to complain about Netflix's poor service quality you are very mistaken. That it works fine for you doesn't mean it works the same for everybody, especially when there are several people here who share my point of view, at least when it comes to the video streaming, and apparently I have better hearing than most so I'm able to hear a very obvious compression artifact, which is not a fault with the technology itself, Dolby Digital is very good technology if it's not compressed to such a ridiculously low bitrate. 384 kbps is decent for stereo, even less than that, but not for 5 full channels and 1 LFE channel.

After all, if this poor compression quality was my imagination, or my equipment, I would hear it in all the streams including those of Vudu and Amazon, and I don't. But I'd be willing to bet that many of the people who listen with attention to the sequence of Breaking Bad I mentioned will hear this horrible quality audio. Especially if they have the Blu-rays or even the DVDs to compare it to.
DD@ 384kbps was the standard rate on laserdiscs and early on for DVD too.Both for 5.1 tracks.I can't remember many complaints about it,especially on LDs. You also forgetting that you posting on a website,so your claim about your superior hearing is rather irrelevant,since it can't be validated by a third party observer. Like it's been said if you're not happy with Netflix cancel it and move on. That's what I would do.
post #3161 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

DD+ is touted by Dolby as being twice as efficient as basic DD; more bang for the bit is why Dolby pitches it for use by streaming services. 384 Kbps should always be superior to the quality of the 448 Kbps basic DD typical of 5.1 soundtracks on DVDs; TV surround tracks use basic DD at similar bit rates. It's certainly no competition for the lossless formats used on BDs, the Netflix experience isn't in competition with that. I believe that VUDU uses DD+ encoded at similar rates..

You could be right in that 384 kbps is not the most damaging element here, however, I have no way of knowing for sure that the audio stream in question is actually 384 kbps. To me it sounds much lower than that. You have a valid point in that broadcast TV uses 384 kbps AC3 and it doesn't sound terrible, therefore DD+ should in theory sound better. Perhaps that's the case, but in Netflix's case their DD+ streams sound terrible. Perhaps it's the encoder they use. My guess is that their audio encoder is not very good quality.

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehun View Post

DD@ 384kbps was the standard rate on laserdiscs and early on for DVD too.Both for 5.1 tracks.I can't remember many complaints about it,especially on LDs. You also forgetting that you posting on a website,so your claim about your superior hearing is rather irrelevant,since it can't be validated by a third party observer. Like it's been said if you're not happy with Netflix cancel it and move on. That's what I would do.

I was joking about the superior hearing, at 42 years old my hearing is probably diminished, especially in the high frequencies, as is the case with everybody else. I also admit that I have my receiver equalized to +5db at 16 KHz and +2 at 8 KHz to hear better those high frequencies. But if I play the same exact sequence from the Blu-ray it sounds great, and if I play the stereo track it doesn't sound as good but at least it's tolerable. the 5.1 DD+ track is garbage. Anyone with a decent audio setup will be able to hear it. And this is an example, it's not only Breaking Bad, I heard the same awful quality on other titles as well.
post #3162 of 5439
Could someone else with great audio equipment listen to that scene (Breaking Bad, Season 3, Episode 12 "Half Measures" at around 9 minutes 30 seconds) and tell us what they hear?

Netflix claims that they're using 384 Kbps DD+ sound in this blog entry:
Quote:
Our highest quality files are 4800 kbps (for 1080p HD video) and 384 kbps audio (for 5.1 audio).

At the time I was farting around with collecting bit rate data on Netflix and other services and that number closely corresponded to my estimate of Netflix 5.1 audio bit rate. But that was back in March 2011. Since then they've adopted some video encoding technology from a company called eyeIO and replaced those 4800 Kbps 1080p encodes with 3850 Kbps ones. In April of 2012 Dolby Labs issued this PR stating that they'd achieved even higher efficiency with new encoder technology:
Quote:
Significant advancements in the core encoding process enable providers to deliver cinematic 5.1-channel surround sound at 192 kbps, half the data rate typically used by traditional broadcast services today.
...
Typically, broadcasters and other service providers deliver Dolby Digital 5.1-channel audio at an average data rate of 384 kbps. The latest Dolby Digital Plus encoding enhancements will reduce the data rate required by 50 percent—to 192 kbps—thanks to extensive research into algorithm optimizations. These reductions can translate into more space for HD channels on congested terrestrial platforms, more opportunity to deploy added features such as 7.1-channel surround sound and multiple languages on pay-TV services, and multiroom capability on IPTV systems. Online-content providers can also leverage the savings to reach more consumers with optimized audio.

Netflix may have adopted that new encoder technology and used it to reduce their bit rates even further. Looking at the debugging information available in the Win8 Netflix app it appears that that app at least is getting 192 Kbps DD+:

Win8 Netflix App Debugging Info (Click to show)

(Breaking Bad is SD-only in PC players, but I see the same audio bit rate on titles which are HD). So it's possible that Netflix has lowered their encoding bit rate to 192 Kbps. (The stereo track on PCs has always been 64 Kbps and still is; there's no way for me to find out what it is on other devices). In any case it still sounds pretty good to me. Obviously YMMV smile.gif.
post #3163 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Looking at the debugging information available in the Win8 Netflix app it appears that that app at least is getting 192 Kbps DD+:

Win8 Netflix App Debugging Info (Click to show)

That seems about right. 192 kbps for 5.1 channels is an atrocity. It's only good for stereo. Now, the sound on Breaking Bad is usually very good and the mics seem well placed with some exceptions, but they seem to use mics that have a very high frequency response, which is the case for many other movies and TV shows as well. But I bought the second half of season 5 on Vudu (I made the mistake of starting to binge watch Breaking Bad a little too early) and the DD+ sound on it is fine, with none of the awful noise deficiencies of Netflix.

By the way, how do you access the debugger in the Netflix Win 8 app?
post #3164 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

That seems about right. 192 kbps for 5.1 channels is an atrocity.

You can't generalize--encoders ae not created equal. I'll give Dolby the benefit of a doubt biggrin.gif.
Quote:
By the way, how do you access the debugger in the Netflix Win 8 app?

CTRL-SHIFT-ALT-D. It probably works without the ALT--the stream manager does (CTRL-SHIFT-ALT-S)--but it works with the ALT and you need it to get the same info from the web site player.
post #3165 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post


DD+ is touted by Dolby as being twice as efficient as basic DD; more bang for the bit is why Dolby pitches it for use by streaming services. 384 Kbps should always be superior to the quality of the 448 Kbps basic DD typical of 5.1 soundtracks on DVDs; TV surround tracks use basic DD at similar bit rates. It's certainly no competition for the lossless formats used on BDs, the Netflix experience isn't in competition with that. I believe that VUDU uses DD+ encoded at similar rates..

Agree Even if all things were equal (no of channels.format ,etc ) to reverse things I SRSLY don't think any of us here could hear the difference between 448 Kbps and 384 Kbps ofc DD+ vs DD is another matter as you pointed out above. eek.gif
post #3166 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

You can't generalize--encoders ae not created equal. I'll give Dolby the benefit of a doubt biggrin.gif.

Of course not all encoders are the same, but you can't just put 6 channels, even if one is not full range, in 192 kbps and expect it to sound good, unless your target sound system is tiny laptop speakers. On a half decent home theater it sounds like crap, plain and simple.
post #3167 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebaz View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

You can't generalize--encoders ae not created equal. I'll give Dolby the benefit of a doubt biggrin.gif.

Of course not all encoders are the same, but you can't just put 6 channels, even if one is not full range, in 192 kbps and expect it to sound good, unless your target sound system is tiny laptop speakers. On a half decent home theater it sounds like crap, plain and simple.

My system is at least half decent and it doesn't sound like crap to me. Dolby claims "cinematic 5.1-channel surround sound" at 192 Kbps and I'd like to think that Netflix conducted a battery of tests on a variety of materials comparing SnR on all channels (relative to lossless) at 192 Kbps encoded with the new tech versus 384 Kbps encoded with the new tech, as well and proper subjective listening tests before deciding to go with it. Saving .2 Mbps isn't worth any significant degradation. It's 90 MB/hour, a drop in the bucket.
post #3168 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

My system is at least half decent and it doesn't sound like crap to me. Dolby claims "cinematic 5.1-channel surround sound" at 192 Kbps and I'd like to think that Netflix conducted a battery of tests on a variety of materials comparing SnR on all channels (relative to lossless) at 192 Kbps encoded with the new tech versus 384 Kbps encoded with the new tech, as well and proper subjective listening tests before deciding to go with it. Saving .2 Mbps isn't worth any significant degradation. It's 90 MB/hour, a drop in the bucket.

It doesn't seem to me that Netflix did too much testing, if they did, it must have been with TV speakers at best. I don't care much about the theory behind it, when I hear it and it sounds like crap. And like I said, it's not my equipment, bad hearing or my imagination, because I played the same episode on Blu-ray and it sounded perfect. And Breaking Bad on Vudu, even if it's not the same episode, sounds perfect as well. Either 192 kbps is too little for 5.1 (which seems to me to be the case, despite Dolby's claim) or Netflix is using a really bad encoder.
post #3169 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I'd like to think that Netflix conducted a battery of tests on a variety of materials comparing SnR on all channels (relative to lossless) at 192 Kbps encoded with the new tech versus 384 Kbps encoded with the new tech, as well and proper subjective listening tests before deciding to go with it.
lol
post #3170 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Saving .2 Mbps isn't worth any significant degradation. It's 90 MB/hour, a drop in the bucket.

Does seem strange they would degrade sound quality for a measily 0.2Mbps.

I have to say both DD on my Apple TV and DD+ on my Chromecast sound pretty good to me on my system which is a mid-range set up.

I would say it is at least comparible with DirecTV 5.1
post #3171 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post

I assume you are continuing to use the Chromecast.

In this case yes you should get 5.1 if available on that title. I get DD+ from my Chromcast plugged into my AVR compared to DD on my Apple TV - both on Netflix.
Indeed the movie I ran last night showed HD and 5.1 but I only got Dolby ProLogic on the AV receiver. That's because the Chromecast is plugged into the TV HDMI and I'm running SPDIF back to the receiver. The TV shows PCM and Dolby Digital (hence Prologic) options for SPDIF. That just won't do so a new AV Receiver is in order and the Chromecast will go there. Searching around a lot of TVs only offer Dolby stereo out on SPDIF and optical. Plus it caused a problem with the BD player which had no problem with Dolby 5.1 and DTS but routing it out of the TV gave me only Prologic.

One thing I did do yesterday was check for the SDK for the Chromecast and learned I already have it as part of the Android SDK (under extras). It is the Android 7 compatibility API and known as the "mediarouter". Since it does not require the Google SDK to operate there may indeed be a forthcoming app for Amazon Instant and Chromecast.
post #3172 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

Could someone else with great audio equipment listen to that scene (Breaking Bad, Season 3, Episode 12 "Half Measures" at around 9 minutes 30 seconds) and tell us what they hear?

Netflix claims that they're using 384 Kbps DD+ sound in this blog entry:
At the time I was farting around with collecting bit rate data on Netflix and other services and that number closely corresponded to my estimate of Netflix 5.1 audio bit rate. But that was back in March 2011. Since then they've adopted some video encoding technology from a company called eyeIO and replaced those 4800 Kbps 1080p encodes with 3850 Kbps ones. In April of 2012 Dolby Labs issued this PR stating that they'd achieved even higher efficiency with new encoder technology:
Netflix may have adopted that new encoder technology and used it to reduce their bit rates even further. Looking at the debugging information available in the Win8 Netflix app it appears that that app at least is getting 192 Kbps DD+:

Win8 Netflix App Debugging Info (Click to show)

(Breaking Bad is SD-only in PC players, but I see the same audio bit rate on titles which are HD). So it's possible that Netflix has lowered their encoding bit rate to 192 Kbps. (The stereo track on PCs has always been 64 Kbps and still is; there's no way for me to find out what it is on other devices). In any case it still sounds pretty good to me. Obviously YMMV smile.gif.

That sounds about right then. I have noticed more compression issues with the audio lately than I have in the past. I'll need to check out that Breaking Bad section to see how it sounds.
post #3173 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Searching around a lot of TVs only offer Dolby stereo out on SPDIF and optical. Plus it caused a problem with the BD player which had no problem with Dolby 5.1 and DTS but routing it out of the TV gave me only Prologic.

It is actually also a problem with HDMI Audio Return Channel. A lot of TVs (mine included) only send stereo on ARC.

Good luck with the new AVR - I suspect you will enjoy it. I updated mine a couple of years ago to handle the ROKU 2 DD+ I was using at the time. A nice side benefit for me with the new AVR was support for Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio.

I find that the Chromecast works well plugged into an AVR HDMI - I plug the USB power cable into a USB port on the AVR and that way the Chromecast powers down when the AVR is off (you probably noticed the Chromecast gets quite hot)!

I have seen reports that some HDMI 1.4 ports can power the Chromecast - but at least for me my AVR HDMI 1.4a ports doesn't power the Chromcast - hence the use of the USB port and supplied adapter.
post #3174 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post

It is actually also a problem with HDMI Audio Return Channel. A lot of TVs (mine included) only send stereo on ARC.

Good luck with the new AVR - I suspect you will enjoy it. I updated mine a couple of years ago to handle the ROKU 2 DD+ I was using at the time. A nice side benefit for me with the new AVR was support for Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio.

I find that the Chromecast works well plugged into an AVR HDMI - I plug the USB power cable into a USB port on the AVR and that way the Chromecast powers down when the AVR is off (you probably noticed the Chromecast gets quite hot)!

I have seen reports that some HDMI 1.4 ports can power the Chromecast - but at least for me my AVR HDMI 1.4a ports doesn't power the Chromcast - hence the use of the USB port and supplied adapter.
Picked up a deal on the Yamaha RX-V375 and I've never heard the speakers sound so good. I haven't tried the Chromecast without the power supply but will. Yes, I did a search when I saw the port out on the TV didn't support surround and found that a lot of sets don't. Played a 139 minute Netflix film in prime time and no rebuffering at SuperHD and 5.1.
post #3175 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

Picked up a deal on the Yamaha RX-V375 and I've never heard the speakers sound so good.

I'm always amazed at all of the features included in today's economy receivers and the RX-V375 is no exception. This looks like a good one, enjoy.
post #3176 of 5439
I gave up "trophy hardware" a long time ago and look for values. Did I mention the 55" LED set was only $499? It's a "dumb TV" but I already had enough device that I didn't need a smart one. And the PQ is fine.
post #3177 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

I gave up "trophy hardware" a long time ago and look for values. Did I mention the 55" LED set was only $499? It's a "dumb TV" but I already had enough device that I didn't need a smart one. And the PQ is fine.


What brand is it?



Ian
post #3178 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

I gave up "trophy hardware" a long time ago and look for values. Did I mention the 55" LED set was only $499? It's a "dumb TV" but I already had enough device that I didn't need a smart one. And the PQ is fine.
+1 Unless you wanna step up to 7.1 theres not a lot the 375 cant do that the higher end AVRs can.
post #3179 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

I It's a "dumb TV" but I already had enough device that I didn't need a smart one. And the PQ is fine.

I wish they only sold dumb TV's. I never use the Smart TV featrures on mine (they quickly are out of date and can't really use an attached AVR). Like you I have enough alternate devices (which are kept up to date by the various vendors).

I actually wish that I could buy just a 55" monitor - I never use the TV speakers either......
post #3180 of 5439
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post

I wish they only sold dumb TV's. I never use the Smart TV featrures on mine (they quickly are out of date and can't really use an attached AVR). Like you I have enough alternate devices (which are kept up to date by the various vendors).

I actually wish that I could buy just a 55" monitor - I never use the TV speakers either......
+1 I would pay for better picture quality over Smart features any day.
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