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Netflix streaming quality - Page 149

post #4441 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Conrad View Post

I'm beginning to wonder if Chromecast stuff comes in off Google CDNs? Hulu+ is always fine at prime time too with Chromecast. I would love to have Amazon or VUDU on Chromecast. In fact I want to see the final season of Treme which is only on sale for around $15. I'll have to see if Google Play has it since both Amazon and VUDU have it.
Pretty sure that Amazon is available on Chromecast now, and with the recent SDK not sure what VUDU is waiting for.
post #4442 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttringle View Post

Pretty sure that Amazon is available on Chromecast now.


That would be quick since the SDK just came out but I can find no evidence of it being true.
post #4443 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttringle View Post

Pretty sure that Amazon is available on Chromecast now, and with the recent SDK not sure what VUDU is waiting for.
Nope:
http://www.google.com/intl/en/chrome/devices/chromecast/apps.html

And despite what the tech news sez the SDK is still not available to developers. Reporters seemed to have ignored that sentence that says the SDK will be available once the Google Play 4.2 is rolled out to everyone. In fact an update of the SDK the other day wiped out the preview version.

Gotta hunch too that sticks like Chromecast aren't that hard to do so we are probably about to see several of them appear. Doesn't Samsung already have something like that?
post #4444 of 5480
Finally some article about poor performance especially with Comcast and Verizon.
Netflix performance on Verizon and Comcast has been dropping for months/
See what the article proves that Open Connect ISP's like Google Fiber, Cablevision and Cox are going up every month while the non Open Connect which most people have are going down. Even TWC is seeing a small drop every month even though this month streaming has been pretty good for me which is why you have not heard me complain much here lately.

Any way when I see those commercials for Verizon FiOS I chuckle every time. They boast that they can stream HD movies with no buffering. Yea right maybe on there pathetic Red Box service. The really funny one is the one where they show two computers one on FiOS and the other on Cablevision saying that FiOS downloads are faster. They should try to stream Netflix on both connections then you will really know that you are stuck with a 2 year agreement and horrible service. Cablevison requires no contract and there commercials don't even boast HD movies streaming with no buffering. They don't even mention Netflix or Open Connect. Anyway funny stuff.
post #4445 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

Cablevison requires no contract and there commercials don't even boast HD movies streaming with no buffering. They don't even mention Netflix or Open Connect..

Actually they do with their web site https://www.optimum.net/pages/netflix.html
and email campaigns:





The idea is too keep their customers from switching to Verizon Fios and AT&T Universe. Verizon is their only ISP competitor in the tri state area.




Ian wink.gif
post #4446 of 5480
Ian I have not seen it on there ads. Just Verizon boasting they are the best for streaming and suckers falling for it. I seen them on the Verizon forums switching to FiOS Internet from Cablevision and then regret it after.
post #4447 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

Ian I have not seen it on there ads. Just Verizon boasting they are the best for streaming and suckers falling for it. I seen them on the Verizon forums switching to FiOS Internet from Cablevision and then regret it after.

So that means everyone on fios has a problem? I never have an issue streaming super HD at any time of the day on fios. Watching superhd right now on the apple tv, a device that i never had a problem with. My roku also works great. But you will continue to repeat the same nonsense considering that you experience a lot more problems than me with your earthlink service. I can stream just fine after 22 minutes unlike you, and I'm on what you call crappy FiOS.
post #4448 of 5480
I doubt that everyone on any ISP has problems with Netflix performance.
post #4449 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I doubt that everyone on any ISP has problems with Netflix performance.

You wouldn't be able to discern that if you are an uninformed person looking for an education on the subject of this thread if all you see is the same polutuon from reddice over and over. But hey, Murder She Wrote looks just fine on FiOS after 22 minutes.
post #4450 of 5480
I haven't seen any complaints from the people whose ISPs are Open Connect partners, since their ISPs became OCPs, but we've had both complaints and reports of good Netflix performance from subs of every other major ISP. There were bunches of complaints about Netflix performance by both Comcast and TWC subs, but others subscribers of both ISPs have reported that their Netflix service is just fine all of the time.
post #4451 of 5480
Someone on another forum just pointed out the small print in the Netflix Graph.

These ratings reflect the average performance of all Netflix streams on each ISPs network from Nov. 2012 through Sept. 2013 and average performance during prime time starting in Oct. 2013.

http://ispspeedindex.netflix.com/results/usa/graph

So we really can't compare the before and after - that's naughty Netflix. I am sure there is a valid point to be made - but if you are going to show graphs keep the measurement criteria consistent.

Still consistently getting Super HD here 24/7 on Comcast on an Apple TV.

Edit - this may also explain why expected bump for non-Open Connect ISPs didn't happen in October after the 4300/5800 kbps streams became available for all..... I would be really interested to see the graph with consistent data from Nov 2012 to now.
Edited by undecided - 2/10/14 at 10:33pm
post #4452 of 5480
Like I said Netflix this month on TWC has been great for the most part using the Roku 3 & Chromecast.
post #4453 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

Finally some article about poor performance especially with Comcast and Verizon.
Netflix performance on Verizon and Comcast has been dropping for months/

This article gives a wrong impression that somehow Verizon and Comcast is at fault for poor Netflix streaming performance when the most likely reason is Netflix not paying for sufficient allocation of bandwidth for its contents to CDNs. I like that part about how Netflix is keeping its mouth closed regarding the issue.
post #4454 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

This article gives a wrong impression that somehow Verizon and Comcast is at fault for poor Netflix streaming performance when the most likely reason is Netflix not paying for sufficient allocation of bandwidth for its contents to CDNs. I like that part about how Netflix is keeping its mouth closed regarding the issue.

Actually it seems plausible to me especially the part about "Netflix usage went up, but peering and transit bandwidth didn't". Meanwhile your assertion of Netflix not paying for sufficient bandwidth is backed up by nothing.
post #4455 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post


Edit - this may also explain why expected bump for non-Open Connect ISPs didn't happen in October after the 4300/5800 kbps streams became available for all..... I would be really interested to see the graph with consistent data from Nov 2012 to now.

I still think being able to adjust your video quality settings to limit only 720p or regular 1080p would help a lot with congestion. Right now to adjust your video quality it is either low def SD or Super HD with nothing in between.
post #4456 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

I still think being able to adjust your video quality settings to limit only 720p or regular 1080p would help a lot with congestion. Right now to adjust your video quality it is either low def SD or Super HD with nothing in between.

NF will allow you to adjust data usage settings / bandwidth usage manually ..

If you use a PC or a Mac as well as some of the game consoles, there are hidden menus that will allow adjustments as well ..
post #4457 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgkdragn View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

I still think being able to adjust your video quality settings to limit only 720p or regular 1080p would help a lot with congestion. Right now to adjust your video quality it is either low def SD or Super HD with nothing in between.

NF will allow you to adjust data usage settings / bandwidth usage manually ..

Unfortunately not to that level of granularity. The highest setting less than 3 GB/hour (5800 Kbps Super HD video + 192 Kbps DD+ 5.1 sound = 2.65 GB/hour) is .7 GB/hour, not enough for the highest quality SD video (which would need about .9 GBph w/5.1 sound). They need a 1.9 GBph setting, which'd block only the Super HD encodes.

In the Silverlight and HTML5 web browser players and the Win8 Netflix app you can set a fixed video bit rate, but if the buffer underuns it will pause to rebuffer.
post #4458 of 5480
Interesting

http://recode.net/2014/02/11/netflix-says-verizon-isnt-slowing-down-its-streams/

Evidently from this article

That update comes to us via a note from J.P. Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth, who says he has been talking to Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and CFO David Wells, and they told him they don’t think cable and telco companies are hampering the company’s video streams.

Anmuth doesn’t have much to report on the topic, so here are his comments in their entirety: “Netflix does not seem overly concerned regarding Net Neutrality, and continues to believe that violations would be escalated quickly. Netflix also indicated that it has no evidence or belief that its service is being throttled.”
post #4459 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary J View Post

Actually it seems plausible to me especially the part about "Netflix usage went up, but peering and transit bandwidth didn't". Meanwhile your assertion of Netflix not paying for sufficient bandwidth is backed up by nothing.

Right... transit bandwidth didn't go up, why? Is it because bandwidth was capped? Why would ISP cap transit bandwidth when charging transit is how they make their money? Would it be possible that transit bandwidth is at steady or "capped" level, I don't know, per agreement ISP has with a CDN?
post #4460 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post

Interesting

http://recode.net/2014/02/11/netflix-says-verizon-isnt-slowing-down-its-streams/

Evidently from this article

That update comes to us via a note from J.P. Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth, who says he has been talking to Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and CFO David Wells, and they told him they don’t think cable and telco companies are hampering the company’s video streams.

Anmuth doesn’t have much to report on the topic, so here are his comments in their entirety: “Netflix does not seem overly concerned regarding Net Neutrality, and continues to believe that violations would be escalated quickly. Netflix also indicated that it has no evidence or belief that its service is being throttled.”

Translation: We don't know what we don't know.
post #4461 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by undecided View Post

Interesting

http://recode.net/2014/02/11/netflix-says-verizon-isnt-slowing-down-its-streams/

Evidently from this article

That update comes to us via a note from J.P. Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth, who says he has been talking to Netflix CEO Reed Hastings and CFO David Wells, and they told him they don’t think cable and telco companies are hampering the company’s video streams.

Anmuth doesn’t have much to report on the topic, so here are his comments in their entirety: “Netflix does not seem overly concerned regarding Net Neutrality, and continues to believe that violations would be escalated quickly. Netflix also indicated that it has no evidence or belief that its service is being throttled.”

Yup. It doesn't make any financial sense for ISP to throttle (limit transit) since charging transit is how they make their money. More transit means more revenue to ISPs. It's a simple concept really.
post #4462 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary J View Post

Translation: We don't know what we don't know.

Netflix doesn't blame Verizon. Why do you? Please state your reasoning.
post #4463 of 5480
Latest Chart ..

Verizon drops again ..

post #4464 of 5480
Then Verizon is using false advertisement according to there TV ads. Of course not everyone is having the same problem as somesay here.
post #4465 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

Yup. It doesn't make any financial sense for ISP to throttle (limit transit) since charging transit is how they make their money. More transit means more revenue to ISPs. It's a simple concept really.

I thought that the whole idea of "peering" is that they don't charge each other to cross one another's networks: "You take my traffic, I'll take yours". Controversy arises when there's an imbalance, when one network is trying to move more data through another than they're receiving. A response to that situation is to decline to increase capacity for that incoming traffic to match the demand, forming a bottleneck during peak hours. It's not throttling per se, just refusing to open the door any wider.
post #4466 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I thought that the whole idea of "peering" is that they don't charge each other to cross one another's networks: "You take my traffic, I'll take yours". Controversy arises when there's an imbalance, when one network is trying to move more data through another than they're receiving. A response to that situation is to decline to increase capacity for that incoming traffic to match the demand, forming a bottleneck during peak hours. It's not throttling per se, just refusing to open the door any wider.


Isn't that the reason why ISP's have the option of accessing storage appliances in or near their network, through Open Connect?


Ian
post #4467 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by mailiang View Post

Isn't that the reason why ISP's have the option of accessing storage appliances in or near their network, through Open Connect?

Open Connect establishes direct connections from public peering sites into ISP systems without crossing other people's networks. The option of additionally having caching storage appliances installed in or near their systems is given to systems with 100K subs or more.
post #4468 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

Netflix doesn't blame Verizon. Why do you? Please state your reasoning.

No I am not even going to attempt to top the whole monolithic entity thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

People tend to conceptualize the things they don't quite understand into a single, monolithic entity; and generalize the entity's motives and actions, i.e., Comcast, China, Islam. People also tend to scoff and laugh at things they are unfamiliar with.

People fail to realize that there are many moving parts to a large complex organization and the purpose of some of those parts may go against one another.
post #4469 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeltscott View Post

I thought that the whole idea of "peering" is that they don't charge each other to cross one another's networks: "You take my traffic, I'll take yours". Controversy arises when there's an imbalance, when one network is trying to move more data through another than they're receiving. A response to that situation is to decline to increase capacity for that incoming traffic to match the demand, forming a bottleneck during peak hours. It's not throttling per se, just refusing to open the door any wider.

Right. As ivanhoek said, an ISP will peer with another ISP. A CDN is not an ISP. A CDN will not take traffic from an ISP. It's an one-way street. An ISP makes money by charging transit to a CDN.

I doubt a CDN will have an open-ended bandwidth capacity arrangement with an ISP since that can balloon the transit cost. More likely, a CDN will contract for a set amount of bandwidth. I am sure that ISPs will "open the door wider" if they were paid to do so.
Edited by Apostate - 2/11/14 at 4:23pm
post #4470 of 5480
Quote:
Originally Posted by mailiang View Post

Isn't that the reason why ISP's have the option of accessing storage appliances in or near their network, through Open Connect?

That's to minimize or avoid incurring unnecessary transit cost by Open Connect (Netflix).
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