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The Official AVS Dish DTVPal DVR Topic! - Page 569

post #17041 of 18096
sorry, I did send by email, not by PM
post #17042 of 18096
OK, then I didn't miss a PM.  Thank you.

I hope you don't object to my repeating something you told me in email, but you said that the limit for stored recordings is 600. I'd had perhaps twenty or twenty-two, the number of stored recordings wasn't, or shouldn't have been, the reason; nor was I anywhere near filling the storage.

Anyhow, I ran out of patience and reconnected it tonight, only to find that the physical mishap this afternoon (which was not directly the result of the unit's misbehavior, but it was related: I was trying to connect another antenna, rather than the cable from the DTVPal DVR's RF-out jack, to the TV's RF-in) had bent the TV's end of the HDMI cable, which I now get the pleasure and expense of replacing.

So, I connected the component cables between them instead and tried again.

After replugging the power cord, it took a few presses of the remote's power button to get a reaction.  Finally it booted, and I went to the DVR menu and pressed 1 instead of Select: immediate reboot, without any four-second window, just like last night.

So I waited for the reboot to complete and reformatted the hard drive.  Now I can get to My Recordings, but of course there are none there.  I scheduled a few and we'll see what happens.

It's as if there were something poisonous about the last or second-to-last recording's entry in My Recordings or about the last or second-to-last recording itself.  It was like this (all times CDT):

yesterday, 2:29 PM to 3:02 PM: recorded an event

ca. 3:15-3:37 PM: watched and deleted that event, no problem

6:28 PM to 6:58 PM: another event was scheduled to be recorded, and I'll never know whether it was or not

7:34 PM: I went into the room where the unit is located and found it recording a scheduled event that was supposed to run from 6:58 PM to 8:02 PM

7:34 PM: I tried going to My Recordings and the unit rebooted instead

7:35-ca. 8:00 PM: kept retrying to get to My Recordings and always having reboots, including an attempt after a short disconnection of the power and another attempt after a reset to Factory Defaults

ca. 8:00 PM: yanked the plug to leave it that way

ca. 4:00 PM this afternoon: since the unplugged DVR didn't pass the RF signal all that well, I tried connecting another antenna to the TV's RF-in, but the jack's accessibility is poor (bad design of the television, but I had had to buy it in a hurry and it had the other features I wanted) and I had to maneuver the TV into a particular position to remove one RF cable and connect another, and in the process the TV as I moved it pulled on the HDMI cable leading from the DVR, yanking the DVR off its shelf and, as I found later, bending the TV's end of the HDMI cable

ca. 7:30 PM tonight: reconnected the power, saw the damage to the HDMI cable, connected the component cables, found the DVR still rebooting on any attempt to get to My Recordings, reformatted the HDD, got into My Recordings
Edited by dattier - 6/15/13 at 6:09pm
post #17043 of 18096
quite an adventure smile.gif ...
I would still recommend to check a health of your DVR's drive by MHDD or Victoria at least; who knows how many damages to the drive happened when you drop the DVR
post #17044 of 18096
well looks like an epidemic ! mine started doing exactly the same thing 2 days ago:(

going to try the refomat thing now!
post #17045 of 18096
Guys, we all have the knowledge how open the DVR, we all have computers, most of all running Windows on Intel CPU (x86)...

Why we should start our chores from rebuilding 'a tail of a lizard' ?

Look.

The "epidemic" or not but all current drives are tend to develop some issues over 3-4-5 years of 24/7 using.

And if your DVR (or PC if that matter) expressing some quirks what pretty much easy attributed to abnormal drive's behavior, before reformat it or make some cleanup by deleting files, your best course is (in your best interest - trust IT guy with 30+ years experience: servers/desktops/notebooks, PC, Mac, Sun) to control the situation and do tests of HW first (!)..

That's basic rule of using any of such kind device: do first a tests of HW to be sure its quality OK, then go up to the ladder and do SW checks (file system integrity check, meta-data check, etc).

Why start cleanup your dirty wind-glass if your tires are flat ? smile.gif. Yeah, you would continue drive for a few miles, but it wouldn't bring you to your destination !

Don't hesitate spend 15 min, ok 30 smile.gif min for opening the device and test your drive in a PC by MHDD (isn't blank CD cheaper then your screwdriver?). If you could make self bootable USB stick, I would recommend put MHDD folder there and run it from USB drive, it would help you do store screen's snapshot and keep log of all errors and warnings.

I know, I know ... the drive would not spin-up if you'll use it in PC. Well, why no spend another blank CD for dedicated mini Linux OS boot: like GParEd or find in Internet special ISO what will remove the 'feature' of the drive: Do-Not-Spinup-After-PowerON?

After one hour of MHDD job, you will get full (almost) 'transcript' of your drive' health: just make three simple actions: get SMART data, Run full Scan with Remap=ON and pull second SMART info to see how full scan changed status of your drive. F8-F4-F4-F8

Your new knowledge will give you clear look at the important part of your DVR and you'll know it's health.
More: if you'll cure current problem with weak/bad sectors by the method: these sectors would be remapped and never will use.

There is very important moment: when your DVR is 'choking' on file(s) with bad (unreadable) sectors and you deleting the file ... well you know what would happen next day or week ... the sectors would be allocated to another file and you will be in same awkward position - catching 4 seconds window to erase the file (wait! do Reformat the drive and toss all your sometimes valuable recorded events) and repeat the all the hassles..

For those ppl who are so in love with Windows: there is other free program what will do same actions - Victoria. I would advise you use it if your PC is not loaded with processes and you do not gaming.

The HDD verification process (Scan with Remap) is time sensitive, so best way is to give MHDD full control of your PC's resources and allow it do the job. The program is running under single task MS-DOS.


Tutorial for MHDD

Edited by P Smith - 6/16/13 at 1:50pm
post #17046 of 18096
Is there a tutorial for using those diagnostic tools, one which starts at a very elementary level?  I don't even know what MHDD stands for (and the acronym aids on the web rapidly became useless as there came to be too many possible expansions for each set of initials, so trying to look it up is pointless).
post #17047 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

Is there a tutorial for using those diagnostic tools, one which starts at a very elementary level?  I don't even know what MHDD stands for (and the acronym aids on the web rapidly became useless as there came to be too many possible expansions for each set of initials, so trying to look it up is pointless).
Good idea. (More work for P Smith!) Would be nice to include instructions for how non-windoze users can run these diagnostics too. smile.gif
post #17048 of 18096
Linux ppl ?

Well, smartmontools could help with SMART data and will launch HDD internal routines, but that visualization as MHDD or Victoria ? I have no info.

Check Linux forums and share with us here.
post #17049 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

Linux ppl ?

Well, smartmontools could help with SMART data and will launch HDD internal routines, but that visualization as MHDD or Victoria ? I have no info.

Check Linux forums and share with us here.
Ah, of course. What would we do without you!!! Installed by default on my Squeeze system. Doesn't want to read my Seagate external drives though. Hopefully, I won't have to cross the diagnostic bridge any time soon . . .
post #17050 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

Linux ppl ?

Well, smartmontools could help with SMART data and will launch HDD internal routines, but that visualization as MHDD or Victoria ? I have no info.

Check Linux forums and share with us here.
If you want GUI with smartmontools, look for GSmartControls: http://gsmartcontrol.berlios.de/home/index.php/en/Home ... It works on many OSes. Also, there are other third party based on smartmontools like on Mac OS X: http://www.corecode.at/smartreporter/ ... I have never used these programs with DTV Pal DVRs' HDDs before though. I am sure they should be fine since they are just HDDs and can be used with regular computers if formatted correctly.

Also, isn't MHDD a bit old from 2005? I assume MHDD is similiar to smartmontools and others?
Edited by phildaant - 6/16/13 at 6:02pm
post #17051 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

... who knows how many damages to the drive happened when you drop the DVR
I didn't actually drop it.  Please don't get the impression that the machine had free-fallen ten meters onto jagged rocks.

I have two DVRs connected to the same television; the other is a Motorola DCX3501 rented from Comcast.  Since its top is flat while that of the DTVPal DVR is curved, the DCX sits on the shelf of the TV cart, and I have four separators supporting the corners of the DTVPal above it and keeping air circulation space between the two DVRs.

When I turned the television and the HDMI cables got yanked, the DCX's cable -- though it was the same length and had longer travel because the DCX was lower and therefore farther from the television, which is on top of the cart -- somehow wasn't yanked, but the cable to the PAL was; maybe it was caught on something while the cable to the DCX had some slack?  Anyhow, as the PAL slid backwards and dragged the separators with it along the top of the DCX, the two rear separators went off the top of the DCX, and the rear of the PAL fell about three inches onto the DCX, while the front separators, now positioned across the middle of the DCX, continued to support the front edge of the PAL.

So half of the PAL fell about three inches.

I did buy a new HDMI cable (a six-footer this time) but forgot it in the car.  The garage is detached and I'm already undressed for the night, so the component cables will do until I have gone out for some other reason tomorrow and come back in.
post #17052 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by golinux View Post

Ah, of course. What would we do without you!!! Installed by default on my Squeeze system. Doesn't want to read my Seagate external drives though. Hopefully, I won't have to cross the diagnostic bridge any time soon . . .
Perhaps it is not so since P Smith did not mention it here but in his previous posts I got the impression that there was an .ISO file you could download to create a live file system on a CD or DVD with all the tools on it. You would still need to remove the drive from your DVR and connect it to your computer with a SATA+power cable.
Edited by WillN937 - 6/17/13 at 11:04am
post #17053 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillN937 View Post

Perhaps is is not so since P Smith did not mention it here but in his previous posts I got the impression that there was an .ISO file you could download to create a live file system on a CD or DVD with all the tools on it. You would still need to remove the drive from your DVR and connect it to your computer with a SATA+power cable.
I omitted the essential part, but golinux, sorry ( behind some sarcasm ), I miss how you did manage and what went wrong in your environment. Linux is other small part of my interests, but I did and do some tasks using it.
post #17054 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

So half of the PAL fell about three inches.

If the Pal was plugged in at the time, that could have caused a "head slap," damaging a spot on the HDD platter, so you probably have a few bad sectors on the HDD now.

My guess is that the Pal tried to store info for the first recording (title, description, etc.) in that spot, so anytime you bring up the list of recordings, it tries to read it, gets an error, and tries to recover by rebooting.

MHDD is a DOS-based program for running diagnostics on your HDD. You can download it for free and create a boot CDROM (or even a floppy!) with DOS and MHDD on it; then you connect the Pal's HDD to your PC, boot MHDD, and scan your HDD ("scan" command) to see what's wrong. If the HDD is OK, then the problem must be something else (probably an issue for P Smith to look at).

If there are bad sectors, you can try to get rid of them with a low-level format ("erase" command). If that doesn't work, the bad sectors are probably caused by physical damage; in that case the scan command has a remap function to move the unusable sectors away from the damaged area.

If the damage is too severe to repair, just replace the HDD. It'll give you the chance to upgrade to a larger drive if you want (up to 1TB: about twice the cost of a 250 GB drive, but four times the space). The only problem is, as LenL discovered, some drives won't work internally, so you may also have to buy an external enclosure and SATA-to-eSATA cable to use a new drive.
post #17055 of 18096
MHDD.

I wouldn't retire the tool soon because of it last version's date going to year 2005.

The program has all functionality up today. You will not not find other functions in other recent program doing same tasks with necessaryrequirements.
It has big advantage in such timing-critical operations like testing drives: running under single-task OS and has precise control of IDE/SATA channels. Dedicated control.

If you need to see extended logs - use smartmontools, but it would be very rare case, perhaps for thorough investigation of history the drive.

Only one serious 'flaw' I found in MHDD 2005: new SATA bridges (MB chips) popping up each year, so the program will not see your drive; but I found my one pace - keep old P4 MB dedicated to the processes, some of them very time consuming when you come to scan 2+ TB drive or do sector's copy or managing salvaging data on XFS partitions like using by modern DVRs.

Golinux, if I correctly understand you,: you are not going to use Windows OS, but booting MHDD from selfbootable CD (MS-DOS) wouldn't disrupt your precious Linux environment and would be easy (you are love prompt wink.gif ) walk for you if you'll need to test your HDDs.
Edited by P Smith - 6/17/13 at 8:22am
post #17056 of 18096
Victoria.

If you feel 'naked' when it come to DOS prompt and feel good using GUI like Windows, use Victoria for test your drive(s). It's free after all smile.gif.

As I mentioned before, for run Scan process please, give a rest for the computer: stop all tasks what in not necessary, close all your programs.
post #17057 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

So half of the PAL fell about three inches.
If the Pal was plugged in at the time
It was not.  The drop occurred while the DVR was unplugged; as I detailed previously, the trouble surfaced Friday evening, and after neither a soft reboot nor a quick power cycling had done any good, I decided to leave it unplugged for twenty-four hours and to try again after that.  The mishap took place Saturday afternoon, during the unplugged time.
Quote:
My guess is that the Pal tried to store info for the first recording (title, description, etc.) in that spot,
How, when the symptom showed up the evening before the theoretical bad spot would have been created?
Quote:
... create a boot CDROM (or even a floppy!) with DOS and MHDD on it;
Where would I learn how to do that?
Quote:
then you connect the Pal's HDD to your PC,
Where would I learn how to do that?
Quote:
If the damage is too severe to repair, just replace the HDD.
Where would I learn how to do that?
Quote:
It'll give you the chance to upgrade to a larger drive if you want
The built-in drive has plenty of space for me, thanks.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

If you feel 'naked' when it come to DOS prompt and feel good using GUI like Windows, use Victoria for test your drive(s).
It still requires getting the drive out of the DVR and at least into a drive enclosure if not into the PC's own case. I'd be shared skitless of opening the PAL's case, let alone disconnecting and removing parts or hoping to be able to reinstall or replace what I take out.

In the nineteenth century automobiles were driven only by people capable of repairing them and even building them from scratch.  Some of you can disassemble and reassemble the DVR blindfolded in fifteen minutes or under; please remember that not of all us can, even if we can still connect the unit and use it.
 
post #17058 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

Golinux, if I correctly understand you,: you are not going to use Windows OS, but booting MHDD from selfbootable CD (MS-DOS) wouldn't disrupt your precious Linux environment and would be easy (you are love prompt wink.gif ) walk for you if you'll need to test your HDDs.
You are correct. No Windoze OS on any of my computers. If the disk in my Pal ever starts to act up, I would get a cable and I think smartmontools would recognize it as it does my other WD drives. Should that fail, I would try a bootable MHDD CD and PM you for advice if I get stuck.

FWIW, I have never opened any of my DTVPals despite all the very good reasons to do so. Maybe sometime this summer . . .
post #17059 of 18096
You should open ...outside ! I'm pretty sure you would be surprised how dusty the boxes.
post #17060 of 18096
Dattier: If the Pal was unplugged, the head should have been parked when the drop occurred, so the likelihood of drive damage is significantly less.

But bad sectors can occur without dropping the drive, and the symptoms do sound like a bad sector, so I'd recommend checking the drive anyway.

The MHDD page is here. The Victoria page is here. Programs to work with HDDs aren't really for novices, though. If you're not comfortable switching cables around inside a PC, it's probably best to get someone else to help. You don't want to accidentally erase your PC's HDD!

Replacing the Pal's HDD is probably the easiest thing a novice can try. It's simplest if the new drive is the same size (3.5 inches) as the Pal's existing drive, but there are inexpensive mounting brackets available if you want to use a 2.5-inch drive instead. The drive that came with the Pal is 250 GB, but you can use a SATA drive of any capacity from 80 GB up to 1 TB; the process is exactly the same.

All modern HDDs have an interface with two connectors: the smaller connector is for the SATA cable and the larger connector is for the power cable. You simply disconnect the cables and unscrew the drive from its mounting bracket. Then you screw in the new drive, connect the cables, and power up the Pal. It will quickly format your new drive on boot-up; just go to "My Recordings" to see how much recording space your new drive has.

As I mentioned earlier, LenL discovered that some newer HDDs won't work inside the Pal, even though they have a capacity in the 80 GB to 1 TB range. (These drives will work in an external enclosure, but that's a bit more involved and more expensive.) So if you do try replacing the HDD, look for an older one, and make sure you can return it if it doesn't work (you can always put the old HDD back into your Pal). HDDs that have a "SATA II" or "3 GB/sec" interface are older (and presumably more likely to work) than those with a "SATA III" or "6 GB/sec" interface.
post #17061 of 18096
Quote:
You don't want to accidentally erase your PC's HDD!
Just connect only the drive and disconnect all your drives in the PC.

I'm pretty sure anyone could run the test w/out erasing the recordings smile.gif

From other perspective, well if it will happen, you will have clean 'shiny' drive like new biggrin.gif
post #17062 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

Dattier: If the Pal was unplugged, the head should have been parked when the drop occurred, so the likelihood of drive damage is significantly less.

But bad sectors can occur without dropping the drive, and the symptoms do sound like a bad sector, so I'd recommend checking the drive anyway.
The reboots I was getting [before the drop] are symptomatic of a bad sector?  I think you're the first to say that.  Thank you.
Quote:
If you're not comfortable switching cables around inside a PC, it's probably best to get someone else to help. You don't want to accidentally erase your PC's HDD!
What I'm uncomfortable with or puzzled about are removing the drive from the DVR (discomfort) and making the boot CD or boot floppy (puzzlement).  I'm confident that I wouldn't reformat the wrong drive.
Quote:
Replacing the Pal's HDD is probably the easiest thing a novice can try.
Sounds like the best way to go, if I ever feel ambitious enough to try opening the case, since you say that my starting problem is symptomatic of a bad sector.  All connecting cables and the power cord are now threaded to it through the front of the cart, so it will be very easy to disconnect and reconnect.

Meanwhile, I can just keep the buildup of unwatched programs down (I'd never let it get that high before) so as not to reach that bad sector, which for all we know could have been there since manufacture.  Right now I have literally zero recordings stored on it, not because I fear to keep anything, but because everything I've recorded since Saturday's reformat has been deleted manually after I either watched it or decided not to watch it.
post #17063 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

Dattier: If the Pal was unplugged, the head should have been parked when the drop occurred, so the likelihood of drive damage is significantly less.

But bad sectors can occur without dropping the drive, and the symptoms do sound like a bad sector, so I'd recommend checking the drive anyway.
The reboots I was getting [before the drop] are symptomatic of a bad sector?  I think you're the first to say that.  Thank you.

 

I have a recorder that had bad sector(s) that I "fixed" by recording to end of capacity a couple of times, which forced the use of reserve sectors. My recorder just stops recording when full OS-defined capacity is reached.

 

Might be something simple... at least one fill-up your current problems should allow... you could try before going the replacement route?

 

Theorists can now weigh in. biggrin.gif

post #17064 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

The reboots I was getting [before the drop] are symptomatic of a bad sector?  I think you're the first to say that.  Thank you.
What I'm uncomfortable with or puzzled about are removing the drive from the DVR (discomfort) and making the boot CD or boot floppy (puzzlement).  I'm confident that I wouldn't reformat the wrong drive.
Sounds like the best way to go, if I ever feel ambitious enough to try opening the case, since you say that my starting problem is symptomatic of a bad sector.  All connecting cables and the power cord are now threaded to it through the front of the cart, so it will be very easy to disconnect and reconnect.

Meanwhile, I can just keep the buildup of unwatched programs down (I'd never let it get that high before) so as not to reach that bad sector, which for all we know could have been there since manufacture.  Right now I have literally zero recordings stored on it, not because I fear to keep anything, but because everything I've recorded since Saturday's reformat has been deleted manually after I either watched it or decided not to watch it.

Here is one of safe procedure of opening your DVR : http://www.avsforum.com/t/1099071/the-official-avs-dish-dtvpal-dvr-topic/16740#post_23248398
post #17065 of 18096
Actually the reboots are symptomatic of corrupted meta-data in the recording, but the fact that the problem occurred again (after you used the Pal's diagnostics to reformat the drive) strongly indicates a bad sector. Something is causing data to get corrupted repeatedly and that seems most likely.

Another possibility is firmware corruption, but if that's the case you'll need to get P Smith to re-flash your Pal. It's easier to check the HDD first.

Someone reported a similar problem a while ago. He was lucky: the corrupted recording wasn't the first one in his list, so it only rebooted when he moved the selection to point to the bad recording.

IIRC it was still quite a PITA to fix, since he couldn't delete it directly (the Pal rebooted whenever he pointed to it to try). He did figure out a way to delete it without reformatting, though.

As far as making a boot disk, the procedure is slightly different for a CD or a floppy. For a boot CD, you'd:
  1. Download the MHDD file containing the boot CD image, which is a .ZIP file
  2. UnZIP it, giving you a .ISO file
  3. Insert a blank CD into your CD burner
  4. Right-click the .ISO file (you should see a "Create Disk" option. Click it)

Once Windows burns your CD, just leave it in the CD drive and power down your PC. Disconnect your PC's HDD and connect the Pal's HDD in its place (the PC will use the same two cables as the Pal). Then power up the PC; it should boot from the CD and run the MHDD program.
post #17066 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post


[*] Right-click the .ISO file (you should see a "Create Disk" option. Click it)
Or if you use other software, look for a "burn image" option.
post #17067 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by wajo View Post

I have a recorder that had bad sector(s) that I "fixed" by recording to end of capacity a couple of times, which forced the use of reserve sectors. My recorder just stops recording when full OS-defined capacity is reached.

Might be something simple... at least one fill-up your current problems should allow... you could try before going the replacement route?
It's going to take a lot of recording to fill the drive, though, even from a 1080i station, so I don't know if that's practicable, and if the inclusion of a bad sector is the reason, it will just make me lose what I've recorded (and not yet deleted) since the reformat when I have to reformat again.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith View Post

Here is one of safe procedure of opening your DVR : http://www.avsforum.com/t/1099071/the-official-avs-dish-dtvpal-dvr-topic/16740#post_23248398
Thank you; actually, I did remember that it was discussed near the dawn of this thread, but that doesn't mean I have the nerve to do it.
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHBrandt View Post

Actually the reboots are symptomatic of corrupted meta-data in the recording, but the fact that the problem occurred again (after you used the Pal's diagnostics to reformat the drive) strongly indicates a bad sector.
It didn't occur again after the reformat.
Quote:
Someone reported a similar problem a while ago. He was lucky: the corrupted recording wasn't the first one in his list, so it only rebooted when he moved the selection to point to the bad recording.
Hmm. I'll need to check, but isn't the option setting for the order of listing the recordings somewhere else, such that if it is the first recording, one can reverse the order and get it to be last, and then watch other recordings before reformatting?  [Edit: no, it is also in My Recordings, so that won't help if the poison entry is the first one listed.]
Quote:
He did figure out a way to delete it without reformatting, though.
Thank you.  Does anyone remember what that was?
Edited by dattier - 6/19/13 at 9:40am
post #17068 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

Quote:
He did figure out a way to delete it without reformatting, though.
Thank you.  Does anyone remember what that was?

Yes, here is his original message.

Here was the suggested fix.

Here was the solution that worked.

In your case, apparently the first recording in the list was bad, which is why it immediately crashed going to the recordings screen. All you needed to do was set a new recording, and let it record. Then the bad recording would have moved to the second in the list, and then you could have gotten to the recordings screen without it crashing. Then you could have tried other methods to get rid of the bad recording. Unfortunately I have been out of town, or I might have saved you the trouble of having to reformat.

Mark
post #17069 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by P Smith

Here is one of safe procedure of opening your DVR : http://www.avsforum.com/t/1099071/the-official-avs-dish-dtvpal-dvr-topic/16740#post_23248398
Thank you; actually, I did remember that it was discussed near the dawn of this thread, but that doesn't mean I have the nerve to do it.
Exactly. I have several threads about opening the PAL bookmarked. Sometimes I reread them. One of these days, I may actually be brave enough to give it a try. (Not much of a hardware person.)
post #17070 of 18096
Quote:
Originally Posted by mabuttra View Post

Yes, here is his original message.

Here was the suggested fix.

Here was the solution that worked.

In your case, apparently the first recording in the list was bad, which is why it immediately crashed going to the recordings screen. All you needed to do was set a new recording, and let it record.
Not so sure; after the reboot it resumed recording the interrupted event, which must have added another recording at the top of the list, right?  But the reboots still occurred when I tried to enter "My Recordings."
Quote:
Unfortunately I have been out of town, or I might have saved you the trouble of having to reformat.
No regrets; surely your trip was of more value than my lost DVR recordings.  Thank you as always, Mark.
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