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Memory card format viability - Page 13

post #361 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Do not ASSUME. There are will be no HD movies when the kiosks first come out.

Please - enough of the negative speculation (FUD).

How is it FUD when the companies behind this said them selves that they wouldn't be doing HD in the beginning?
post #362 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvillain View Post

How is it FUD when the companies behind this said them selves that they wouldn't be doing HD in the beginning?

This is what he said:

Quote:
So an HD movie will take 12-20 minutes?
post #363 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by 42Plasmaman View Post

Forgot about the aspect that these kiosks will most likely only service ONE person at a time.
So a single person could start the kiosk SW to start browsing & take up any where from 5-15 minutes from start(browse, select, download to SD).

Then I wonder if a particular person starts to take a long time if people in line will start making comments on what's taking them so long.

In a worst case senario, only 4 people per hour could be serviced from a kiosk.

Heck, even at 5 minutes per person, if I'm third in line, I have to wait 10 minutes in line.
I never wait more than a couple minutes at my local rental stores.

I would say shrinked wrapped memory cards may have some chance of success. The kiosk approach has zero chance of success IMO.
post #364 of 460
You could double the number of terminals with out having to duplicate the back end storage part which would help keep the price down. But we have all seen momo at the video story trying to pick out a movie while yacking at his GF on the cell phone. He reads the back of the package, they discuss he puts it back, he picks up some thing else. In Canada people don't pack guns. I worry for some people in the US.
post #365 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Your arguments are forgetful of:

2008 optical disc revenue - sales fell while rentals were flat.

Redbox ($1 a night rentals) is now up to over 10,000 kiosks and growing .

Seems you are forgetful of the flaw someone earlier point out. Redbox gives you not only the movie, but the container for the movie (the disc). You would need to remember to bring your download card with you when you stopp in. No impulse buys which account for alot. People are secure with DVD as it has been around so long. furthermore, the players are already in households. And even then, it is less than 500,000 per month (link).

Implementing. this is the problem... again. You need to standardize the format... and more importantly the player (after you make and produce one which has not be done for a universal format as there is still no universal format).

The alure of redbox is convenience. While you are at the store or restaurant, you rent the disk there on your way home. Yet again, how is running to the store to load up your flash device more convenient than downloading it from the comfort of you home? Their is no gain.... if you are at the store already... and there is a neg if you have to run out soley for this.

----

Everyone seems to be dancing around the question I have raised again... and again... and again.

What is the advantage of going to a kiosk versus downloading it at home?
  • Selection? No. A central download model will always yield you more choices because of storage. Anyone who has a media server knows how quickly storages gets eaten up.
  • Convenience? You have actually go outside your house to get it.
  • Bandwidth Caps? They have plans for unlimited downloads if you really use them that much. Again, if you factor in the gas, rental charge and time, you would probably come out ahead. I had a cap on mine. I called and negotiated with Comcast down to $30 per month unlimited for 12 months (like I will do again). And as this flash model is not out yet, we could very well see them go away in the future just like they did in the past (remember when dialups tried charging per minute?)
  • Safety? Well, you don't have to worry about injury or accident on the way at home. Well then again, your home can be just as dangerous... maybe you got me there.
  • Competition? This will depend where you live. Many folks may end up with only one supplier. Competition keeps prices down.
  • Cost? It will cost more to maintain this. we just have a vending machine with redbox now with a computer tracking system. It is much different than having a 10TB server at each location (10gb x 1000... minimum)

I know it may seem that rebox is more convenient. I looked at it and there were so many titles in it... I had seen most. no older titles for the most part. No individual selection. If this became the norm, can you imagine having to stand behind somebody who is not sure what he wants and is also deciding how much of the movie package he wants? It would be akin to standing behind someone in the self-check out line who has no idea to operate it.
post #366 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

When that new standard is set - then all flash card manufacturers will be working in unison and THAT is why the prices are going to fall faster then anyone realizes here.

Which standard is that? The CFast standard, the SDXC standard, or the Universal Flash Standard?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And for the life of me . . . why do people believe that a 2TB 300 Mbps card is "right around the corner?"

It probably doesn't help that the original post in this thread states that "a recently announced 2TB memory card" and "2TB SDXC Memory Card Announced".


Quote:
Originally Posted by bjmarchini View Post

You need to standardize the format... and more importantly the player (after you make and produce one which has not be done for a universal format as there is still no universal format).

That is a good point and we have heard very little from Mod Systems about the video format specs. They have not yet announced the AV codecs, the AV bitrates, the DRM system, the interactive layer, or the physical layer (SD, SDHC, or SDXC).


Quote:
Originally Posted by bjmarchini View Post

It is much different than having a 10TB server at each location (10gb x 1000... minimum)

To be fair we don't know which AV codecs will be supported or how much compression will be used.
post #367 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Do not ASSUME. There are will be no HD movies when the kiosks first come out.

So the original question is why in the hell is this in the HD media forum if HD is not even an option?
post #368 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Paul View Post

Which standard is that? The CFast standard, the SDXC standard, or the Universal Flash Standard?

Point made. Three different Associations. Though it appears that the SDA is the largest by far of the three.
post #369 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by phansson View Post

So the original question is why in the hell is this in the HD media forum if HD is not even an option?

Because the Mods have decided that as long as we discuss the actual technology itself - Cards - it does fit because HD content will eventually be placed on Cards.

If you have a problem - take it up with them.
post #370 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

What do you expect?

Sony almost always goes it on their own to try (and fails most of the time) to establish their own priority format.


Unlike UMD which is a failure, Memory Stick is a reasonable success. They earn a higher margin than SD disks and sell millions of them each year.

It's like saying Mac OS X is a failure since only Apple computers use them.
post #371 of 460
A 4-way kiosk doesn't necessarily solve the potential problem of multiple customers. It simply shifts the nature of the bottleneck. You may no longer have 4 people waiting in line with the guy in front filling a card at full speed for 5 min (what if he filling up with videos for the month?...there goes the 5 min deal), but if you have 4 cards getting filled simultaneously, that could easily double or triple the load times for everybody due to bandwidth contention. If the media is all coming from a mult-TB hdd, the best speed you can really run is at hdd speed and then divided by the number of simultaneous data request operations. It only gets worse if the files are significantly fragmented, as well.
post #372 of 460
So I have read people talking about being able top play an HD movie on their home theater set up and also be able to watch it on their cell phone. They also say that the whole thing will fit into some ridiculously small space like 9 or 12GB. I don't personally buy into the idea of HD in that small of space but lets skip that for a second.

In order to get your movies down to that size with any thing better than DVD quality you have to go to some thing h.264 based. How many cell phones have the power to decode 1920 x 1080 h.264 on the fly? My guess is some where between zero and very few. In that case doesn't the whole argument about being able to move the content around go out the window? You could do it in mpeg2 but then the size of your file explodes. If it is DRM'd then I don't think you will be able to transcode it and I would be surprised if they would let you load it twice in different resolutions.

Thoughts?
post #373 of 460
That is definitely a pickle!

One could reason that future cellphones will have more powerful hardware onboard (though I would imagine that spec'ing for this kind of playback on a dedicated cellphone device with a tiny screen is really practicing some overkill), but then power consumption becomes a problem. A small battery can only store so much charge and blowing out the capacity just to decode 1080p on a cellphone would really be impractical, where time-before-recharge will likely be the greater priority.

h264 still takes a healthy chunk of processing resources whether it is a cpu or an embedded soc doing it. Doing it at hd resolutions is just that much more strenuous. It's going to suck a good deal of power (as far as mobile devices are concerned), no matter what kind of device pulls it off. It's conceivable that such a device getting through an entire 2 hr movie on a single charge would be a stretch. A simple laptop can barely pull this off, and that is with a lithium battery the size of baby arm.

Then comes the issue of heat. They already get a bit warm just playing music or during a long call. No one is going to appreciate it going nuclear just to play a 1080p download in h264, I'd anticipate.
post #374 of 460
So the problem that we face?

How to transfer the content
Playback on portable devices
Backup
Price
Quality
post #375 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post


Quote:


Originally Posted by Richard Paul
Which standard is that? The CFast standard, the SDXC standard, or the Universal Flash Standard?

Point made. Three different Associations. Though it appears that the SDA is the largest by far of the three.

Some misconceptions to be cleared up and some conceptual ideas.

Universal Flash Standard or Universal Flash Storage (UFS) is not a flash card type standard. Universal Flash Storage (UFS) is the work of JEDEC; “Solid State Technology Association, formerly known as Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC) or Joint Electron Device Engineering Councils, is the semiconductor engineering standardization body of the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA), a trade association that represents all areas of the electronics industry in the United States.” Wikipedia
Their work on Universal Flash Storage (UFS) is among others; to fix a common standard for all memory cards so they can be used in all devices without adapters and should be finalized in 2009.
JEDEC Member Companies

The most used and popular Flash Memory Card standards are Compact Flash and Secure Digital, and in the end; ALL memory card standards sold by the all the largest companies are developed (and often manufactured) by SANDISK anyway.
(including Sony’s Memory Stick and SxS standard which is compliant to the ExpressCard standard created by Sony and Sandisk.

Mentioned earlier in the thread is the SD Association established in 2000 by Panasonic, SanDisk Corporation and Toshiba Corporation. (and the scary fact that Sony isn’t a member ).
http://www.sdcard.org/

The Compact Flash Association was founded in 1995, (no mention by which companies). http://www.compactflash.org/
It’s chaired by Canon and other members of the board are Lexar Media, Inc., Hagiwara Sys-Com.Co.Ltd. Hewlett Packard & SanDisk + CFA Executive Members are Socket Mobile, Inc., SolidGear Corporation,., RED Com. Inc. a total of about 200 member companies.
(and yes, three Sony companies are members )


We also have The Express Card/PCMCIA association.
http://www.expresscard.org/
The Express card is more of a container which the manufacturers can put whatever they want inside including Flash memory. The Express Card/PCMCIA association is a non-profit trade association founded in 1989 and some of the companies that developed this standard are Dell, Hewlett Packard, IBM, Intel, Lexar Media, Microsoft, SCM Microsystems and Texas Instruments.
PCMCIA Members


Flash memory cards are only a “Silicon” storage container that is packaged/laminated in a plastic “box”.
There are many “flash standards” within each Flash Standard; it’s just that each standard is packaged alike to a minimum standard set by the associations. The read/write speed between similar cards can vary even if the cards have the same speed notifications.

What is needed is a Movie&Music Only Card format. (M&MOC)
The most important is an agreement on the size of the Plastic Box (formfactor) and the type of interface contact.
What Flash Standard type of card the manufactures put inside “the box” is unimportant as long as the card can fit into the card slot of any MOD machine and other download devices, and the same goes for the Reader/docking station/player/set-top box//TV/PC, and that they are able to read the content off the card.

In that way we get a healthy price competition and the need for settling on one of the flash card types is gone, and there’s no need for a quarrel among the differnt Flash standards on what flash type standard to use.

If Toshiba or Samsung want to put SD or CF inside the card, it is OK!
If Sony wants to put the same as they use inside a Memory Stick or SxS inside a M&MOC, whatever it is, they can do that!
(is what's inside of a memory stick very different from what’s inside a SD or CF card? Or is it just that Sony with different packaging can sell flash memory more expensive than the competition?)

Using the same “plastic box” or packaging of the card the manufacturers can prevent the card from being used in Cameras/Phones/Tumbdrives and undermine the price and profit of their smaller conventional cards. In that way they should be able to produce and sell a M&MOC card for a low price even if it’s the same inside as in SD and CF cards.

Something like The Express card formfactor is what is needed for a Movie&Music Only Card.
Large enough to display a Movie cover and large enough to contain whatever Flash Memory Standard the different manufacturers want to put inside.
In a way; everything needed for a Movie&Music Only Card already exists today. Nothing new is needed to be invented.
In the end it’s just that some creative people with common sense and good connections and sales skills, do the basic design and put the different existing parts together and propose this to the right parties

In the end it will be SanDisk that will be the big earner on M&MOC, because “everybody” has to pay them for the licence/IP.

But maybe SanDisk will agree to a lower licensing fee for Flash Memory that is used in a Movie&Music Only Card.
post #376 of 460
Here are some card speed tests from; CARDSPEED - Card Readers and Memory Cards


Some Card speeds
#1:
CFast,Type I Interface Clock:3GHz, Max.Transfer speed: 300.0M.
CFast,Type II Interface Clock:3GHz, Max.Transfer speed: 300.0M.
http://www.compactflash.org/

#2:
ExpressCard/54 PCIe X1,
Interface Clock: 2.5GHz,Max.Transfer speed: 250.0M.
ExpressCard/34 PCIe X1
Interface Clock 2.5GHz, Max.Transfer speed: 250.0M.
http://www.expresscard.org/

#3:
Secure Digital Card XC = SDXC Max. Transfer speed: 104.0M.
http://www.sdcard.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ExpressCard



So; put your favourite movie cover on one of these cards and see what it will look alike if one of them or similar was used for pre-recorded Movies.
post #377 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvillain View Post

So I have read people talking about being able top play an HD movie on their home theater set up and also be able to watch it on their cell phone. They also say that the whole thing will fit into some ridiculously small space like 9 or 12GB. I don't personally buy into the idea of HD in that small of space but lets skip that for a second.

In order to get your movies down to that size with any thing better than DVD quality you have to go to some thing h.264 based. How many cell phones have the power to decode 1920 x 1080 h.264 on the fly? My guess is some where between zero and very few. In that case doesn't the whole argument about being able to move the content around go out the window? You could do it in mpeg2 but then the size of your file explodes. If it is DRM'd then I don't think you will be able to transcode it and I would be surprised if they would let you load it twice in different resolutions.

Thoughts?

Watching movies on my cell phone is very low priority to me. But if I did, mine has only a 320x240 resolution and an internet speed of about 500-600 kbps (Sprint/HTC Mogul). There would not be much point in sending a rez greater than the screen. At those low rates it would be easy to transcode on the fly to AVC, WMV, or Flash and stream it from a home server on any fairly modern PC with a standard cable modem service.

As part of my cell data plan I already get CNN and a few other channels at no extra charge at (I think) that rez. So I assume it wouldn't be hard to put together assuming anybody was willing to get around the copy protection and legal issues.

- Tom
post #378 of 460
Did anyone see that 1 hour special on The Science Channel? Called CES 2009?

One of the more interesting products that I posted in the CES Predictions thread was the Pico Projector which is built into a Cell Phone. They had a 7 minute "what's this" section on the show and the device really is amazing.

There is no lens. It uses lasers and is always in focus no matter how close or far from the "screen" the phone is held. They went down to about a 10" image then up to about a 36" image and it really looked impressive. They claim PP's will be built into all kinds of devices.
post #379 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

Did anyone see that 1 hour special on The Science Channel? Called CES 2009?

One of the more interesting products that I posted in the CES Predictions thread was the Pico Projector which is built into a Cell Phone. They had a 7 minute "what's this" section on the show and the device really is amazing.

There is no lens. It uses lasers and is always in focus no matter how close or far from the "screen" the phone is held. They went down to about a 10" image then up to about a 36" image and it really looked impressive. They claim PP's will be built into all kinds of devices.

A device you can't buy... to play hd movies that are not available... from a download kiosk that doesn't exist...
post #380 of 460
Quote:


Watching movies on my cell phone is very low priority to me. But if I did, mine has only a 320x240 resolution and an internet speed of about 500-600 kbps (Sprint/HTC Mogul). There would not be much point in sending a rez greater than the screen. At those low rates it would be easy to transcode on the fly to AVC, WMV, or Flash and stream it from a home server on any fairly modern PC with a standard cable modem service.

The problem is though that if the movie is DRM'd will you be able to transcode it with out cracking it? My guess would be not,but it would depend on implementation. If you can does that mean that you HAVE to be running windows? What version? If not it does take away the "you can play it every where" argument.
post #381 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by fpconvert View Post

A device you can't buy... to play hd movies that are not available... from a download kiosk that doesn't exist...

By that token, we shouldn't have had that HighDef news thread here 2-3 years before HD DVD/BD launched. After all, there were no players, almost no displays with 1080p resolution, no stores carrying product, etc.

Back to the point, I have seen the cell phone projector and the stand-alone version. I thought the one I saw used white LED, not laser. The image was dim but remarkable in the way it comes out such a tiny device. I don't think it solves any real consumer problem but is amazing what technology can do these days.

As to other issues raised, there are answers to all. Not perfect answers but answers nevertheless. Folks should keep in mind that Kiosk solutions in stores (already deployed) have servers with striped/raid drives so bandwidth from the disk to kiosk is NOT a limitation. As such, you can easily have 3, 8 or more Kiosks in a store. Of course, from economics point of view, you want the fastest transfer rate as to lower capital requirements for more Kiosks but there is no technology barrier to having more Kiosks in a store. In addition, a single high performance drive today is 2X faster than the fastest Flash today so you can drive two Kiosks from one disk drive. So more of them easily scales to as many stations as you like.

There are also solutions to portable playback. I can't go into them but if you all think hard enough, you should come up with some of them. As a very obscure hint for one of the solutions, think of Dark Knight BD release.....

On Quality, this one we talked about before. I am sure all of you can afford a 64 Gigabyte Flash card when this format comes out in HD. That size can hold any BD movie and then some. Even a 32 Gigabyte version would do since unlike optical, you don't have to put in all the audio tracks whether the user wants them or not. So renting content in full BD fidelity is a solved problem, assuming enough of you want it and will create a market for it. (Purchasing is a much more complex problem.)

Finally, SanDisk is not the only company with Flash IP although a super important one. Intel+Micron are showing excellent progress on their own, coming up with ultrafast (SLC) Flash and super small "feature size" in 34nm process. And Samsung is going its own way. Toshiba is joined at the hip with SandDisk. And of course, there are continued rumors about SanDisk getting bought by someone else...
post #382 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

In the end it will be SanDisk that will be the big earner on M&MOC, because everybody has to pay them for the licence/IP.

But maybe SanDisk will agree to a lower licensing fee for Flash Memory that is used in a Movie&Music Only Card.

Good post.

Some info from Buffalo Technology. Full story here.

Quote:


Buffalo Technology will no longer be selling USB Flash Drives, MMC memory cards or CompactFlash ®, or any products containing those components in the United States.

In October 2007, SanDisk Corporation filed three separate patent infringement proceedings including: two lawsuits in the Western District of Wisconsin and a proceeding in the International Trade Commission. The Western District of Wisconsin cases have been stayed pending a decision in the International Trade Commission proceeding.

Before purchasing a 16GB SD card, folks may want to checkout users reviews at Newegg.
post #383 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

By that token, we shouldn't have had that HighDef news thread here 2-3 years before HD DVD/BD launched. After all, there were no players, almost no displays with 1080p resolution, no stores carrying product, etc.

Not true, we had the formal announcement of the Blu-ray Disc format on February 19, 2002 by:

Hitachi, Ltd.
LG Electronics Inc.
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.
Pioneer Corporation
Royal Philips Electronics
Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.
Sharp Corporation
Sony Corporation
Thomson Multimedia


We also had D-VHS D-Theater as a commercial product.

AFAIK, there has been no announcement of a HD packaged media using solid state memory. And really, would you purchase a ($20 - $35) movie on a device that you know will lose that Gate Charge at some point in time? Or be instantly rendered useless with a static discharge?
post #384 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post

AFAIK, there has been no announcement of a HD packaged media using solid state memory.

Packaged media? No. But ability to copy to, yes. At CES, the SDA was handing out brochures clearly showing HD movies as an application for SDXC. I couldn't find the graph online in my quick search but this is there: http://www.sdcard.org/developers/tech/sdxc/

"A 2 TB SDXC memory card can store 100 HD movies..."

Quote:


And really, would you purchase a ($20 - $35) movie on a device that you know will lose that Gate Charge at some point in time? Or be instantly rendered useless with a static discharge?

I for one am not advocating pre-recorded movies on Flash. I see no market for that. The main advantage of Flash is to be able to fill it on demand the movies I want and saving a ton of money in the supply chain. Putting movies on it at point of purchase is a solution searching for a problem as BD already does that.

As I have noted before a couple of times, static discharge is a problem for SD but not a problem for Flash memory in general.
post #385 of 460
[quote=amirm;15586753]By that token, we shouldn't have had that HighDef news thread here 2-3 years before HD DVD/BD launched. After all, there were no players, almost no displays with 1080p resolution, no stores carrying product, etc.



In fact, d-vhs tapes capable of 1080i hd output were available in 2002 and my mits crt was capable of 1080i when new in 2001.
post #386 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by fpconvert View Post

In fact, d-vhs tapes capable of 1080i hd output were available in 2002 and my mits crt was capable of 1080i when new in 2001.

1080i != 1080p . I said "nearly" no displays were available. 720p was all the rage then with the exception of SXRD projectors just being introduced.

Anyway, we are rehashing old issues in the thread.

How about this. Do you have any unmet needs in BD format? I have one. I was at CES watching the wonderful images on Joe Kane's projector and new DaLite screen he had helped design. He showed Baraka which looked wonderful in more ways than one beyond the image quality. I wanted to run back to my hotel and using their broadband connection download the same movie and show it as soon as I got home that night. Instead, I had to describe in words to my wife what it was all about and order the disc through Amazon for delivery next week.

It is that immediate access that we are all looking for. The industry at large has said that will become available through cable VOD or digital distribution to PCs and STBs. Is that enough? I say no. They have too many limitations as shown....
post #387 of 460
Amir shouldnt flash gives us more effective encoding since you can have longer GOPs?
post #388 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieSwede View Post

Amir shouldnt flash gives us more effective encoding since you can have longer GOPs?

Correct. Being a new game in town, you could choose longer GOPs, different peak rate, have no burden of having all the streams taking bandwidth whether you watch them exclusively or not (e.g. multiple audio tracks).

To be fair though it has much higher cost per bit. So your average data rate needs to be lower as do file sizes. As costs come down, this will be less of an issue but it is one today.

It will be a strange situation where in difficult segments Flash can outperform BD but have somewhat lower quality in easier segments!

Also, we have another strange issue to deal with. BD format has essentially frozen the silicon specs. Folks think once they meet BD format, they are done. This doesn't impact long GOP support. But does impact peak data rate. Of special note is AVC which has the lowest peak rate availability today. Typical SoC silicon can go as high as 80 to 100 mbit/sec MPEG-2 but barely above 40-50 for AVC (VC-1 falls in between).

That is the bad part of standardization. It tends to limit innovation at times....
post #389 of 460
Amir

Another thing that I have had some thoughts about is the copyprotection.

Today, nothing seems to be protected more then a week or so before the content is out of the open. But for the studio its the first week/weeks that the big money come in. So maybe they are "satisfied" with the first week of protection, since the main money is there.

So would it be possible to create a format that is locked the first month or so, and after that gets unlocked, and the user is free to transfer it to any other device they seem fit?

That would solve the issues about worries that you cant play the software in the future.
post #390 of 460
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieSwede View Post

Amir

Another thing that I have had some thoughts about is the copyprotection.

Today, nothing seems to be protected more then a week or so before the content is out of the open. But for the studio its the first week/weeks that the big money come in. So maybe they are "satisfied" with the first week of protection, since the main money is there.

So would it be possible to create a format that is locked the first month or so, and after that gets unlocked, and the user is free to transfer it to any other device they seem fit?

That would solve the issues about worries that you cant play the software in the future.

That is a pretty creative proposal . For it to work though, the entire movie distribution business needs to change.

The way folks make money for movies is to sell time slots ('release windows'). First the theater, then DVD, then VOD/digital, then cable, then foreign releases, and finally broadcast. As you probably know the last one in US at least, doesn't have copy protection. The fear is if the earlier windows don't have protection, then you can't make money from the others.

You could then argue that the copy protection should go away once the broadcast version comes out. The technology can certainly enable this with an online transaction. I have to think about what other business objections may stand in the way of doing this.

Your post is really making me think.... It is a pretty profound statement. I wish I was still in business and could try to deliver on it somehow. It will surely reduce the burden of copy protection on consumers.....
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