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Nvidia ION

post #1 of 229
Thread Starter 
I've heard some of you mention it, but I didn't look into it until today --> http://www.legitreviews.com/article/876/2/

All I can say is WOW!

post #2 of 229
Nice video overview from CES with demo from Nvidia rep-

http://www.engadget.com/2009/01/12/n...trated-at-ces/

IMO, this is the future of HTPC's. I just wish they'd put it in a wider CE-style enclosure to make it look like a DVD player or other set top, complete with basic LCD display and notebook style DVD-RW.
post #3 of 229
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

IMO, this is the future of HTPC's. I just wish they'd put it in a wider CE-style enclosure to make it look like a DVD player or other set top, complete with basic LCD display and notebook style DVD-RW.

I agree, but I don't like the stb-style idea. Ripping DVD's, etc. to a server is a better idea. I want something microscopic that I can hide behind me with a projector or behind a tv or, even better, behind a wall. My kb and remote/mouse use RF specifically for this purpose.

What would *really* be cool would be to have it integrated into a projector or tv! When's THAT gonna happen??

Also, the ION would be the perfect home for an SSD.
post #4 of 229
That box is just an example to get people excited. I have seen no actual announcements of a manufacturer releasing anything based on it yet. The manufacturers can do whatever they want. I'm sure we'll see some lame 'reference design' releases but we might see some cool stuff. I'd never want it in a projector or tv because if it broke or when it's obsolete....there goes both devices. Never been a fan of combos.

-Trouble
post #5 of 229
Nothing stupendously innovative about this- just putting notebook/netbook components in a small box for desktop/set top use, but still a cool if it leads to custom form factor PC's that use standard components internally, and works with Linux drivers and the best distros.

If the board form factor becomes a "standard", it could supplant ITX. I think using notebook hard drives and memory modules makes a lot of sense, combined with the desktop-like ports on the back.
post #6 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb View Post

Nice video overview from CES with demo from Nvidia rep-

http://www.engadget.com/2009/01/12/n...trated-at-ces/

IMO, this is the future of HTPC's. I just wish they'd put it in a wider CE-style enclosure to make it look like a DVD player or other set top, complete with basic LCD display and notebook style DVD-RW.

If there's no one make notebook-style Blu-Ray drive yet, this is the time.
post #7 of 229
post #8 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarycall View Post

Notebook Blu-Ray Drive


Ehh. doesn't burn nuthin'

...plus it's (gulp) ...Sony

...cool slot load though.
post #9 of 229
Hey guys a few websites got the ION today to do some reviews, enjoy!

http://www.guru3d.com/article/nvidia...eview-preview/
http://anandtech.com/video/showdoc.aspx?i=3509
post #10 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarycall View Post

Notebook Blu-Ray Drive

Wow! I could almost buy PS3 with that price. Nice though. Hope LG will come out with something this year.
post #11 of 229
Thread Starter 
ACER Hornet to be released on April 8 --> http://xbmc.org/forum/showthread.php?t=48069
post #12 of 229
If that box (I mean one like the reference build) gets mass produced at a decent price (<300$ US) it will replace my Popcornhour in an instant!!!

I agree with mythmaster, this box needs not DVD or bluray drive or not even a hdd, just a small SSD or CF card for the OS, the media should all be on a NFS media server (like I'm currently doing with the Popcornhour).
post #13 of 229
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

If that box (I mean one like the reference build) gets mass produced at a decent price (<300$ US) it will replace my Popcornhour in an instant!!!

I agree with mythmaster, this box needs not DVD or bluray drive or not even a hdd, just a small SSD or CF card for the OS, the media should all be on a NFS media server (like I'm currently doing with the Popcornhour).

Or better yet, diskless!
post #14 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

If that box (I mean one like the reference build) gets mass produced at a decent price (<300$ US) it will replace my Popcornhour in an instant!!!

I agree with mythmaster, this box needs not DVD or bluray drive or not even a hdd, just a small SSD or CF card for the OS, the media should all be on a NFS media server (like I'm currently doing with the Popcornhour).

some sites suggest the "low-end" model will reach down to $149... I can't see any option needed above the entry level, except maybe the 2G RAM, esp if not use-upgradeable.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/03/31/i...hdmi-playback/

The only thing I think it will fall flat on is Flash performance, since that still can't be off-loaded via VDPAU. Else a fantastic value (and I will buy one to use as a server at a minimum if not more, since its so much cheaper than the EEEB202, with the B204 and B206 still being vapor-ware)

Crossing my fingers that tomorrow is the day!
post #15 of 229
I would even prefer a barebones box without hdd, RAM and OS, that would be even cheaper and no Microsoft-tax!
post #16 of 229
Looks like Acer wanted to beat em to the punch

http://www.engadget.com/2009/04/07/a...op-aspirerevo/

no pricing info or release date... sigh.
post #17 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by zim2dive View Post

Looks like Acer wanted to beat em to the punch

http://www.engadget.com/2009/04/07/a...op-aspirerevo/

no pricing info or release date... sigh.

Sexy...



They can dump the DB15/VGA though

Cheers,
Kermee
post #18 of 229
Thread Starter 
post #19 of 229
I've read several reports saying late 2Q09 and prior to back-to-school time. I've also seen guesses that say the box should come in right around $300.
post #20 of 229
Thread Starter 
post #21 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by mythmaster View Post

LOL --> http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/...evo-ion-nettop

I guess the author of that article has never heard of HTPCs or Linux...

The only thing that bothered me in that article was that talk about the batch of 9400 not good enough for Apple, what did he mean, are these somehow flawed 9400 chips?
post #22 of 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by tux99 View Post

I guess the author of that article has never heard of HTPCs or Linux...

The only thing that bothered me in that article was that talk about the batch of 9400 not good enough for Apple, what did he mean, are these somehow flawed 9400 chips?

I have some sympathy for the article, but still hope to see and maybe own ION... would have to see a little more detail/fact, but unless ION sells at a significant price discount, one does wonder why use an Atom vs. a low-end C2D. ie. I see no point in paying $300 for an EEE Box PC, with a single core Atom, no matter how good the GPU when I can build a similarly equipped C2D box with 9400 PCI card for the same price and have much more CPU power in reserve for when its needed (ie. these Atom boxes will be useless for Hulu/Flash)

At $150 price point, heck yeah, I pick up an Atom box and use it as a web/mail low-power server, which maybe can also double as my HTPC, altho then I probably want dual-core so I can do HTPC and server at the same time.

The EEE B204 and B206 (I think they were to have an ATI 3450? similar in a way to ION), annc'd in Dec? still have not shipped (I thought they would probably be too pricey anyway)... I hope these "late 2Q" estimates for ION don't follow a similar trend.
post #23 of 229
I worked in the semiconductor industry for 5 years before going to law school. This is a somewhat common practice; it isn't something to be alarmed about. One of my previous employers had a similar issue -a significant number of chips that had higher leakage than the spec would allow for mobile applications. They also packaged these chips up for use in desktop, always plugged in applications. Certain portions of the wafer and certain lots of wafers bin out higher than others at probe, this is the reality of semiconductor manufacturing. In many ways, this is no different than how processor speed grades get binned out, i.e., they don't design a 2.2 GHz part, a 2.4 GHz part and a 2.6 GHz part. They design a 2.6 GHz part and bin the different speed grades out.

I don't believe that there is anything to worry about as far as reliability or functionality go. These parts (if the Inquirer's assertion is even true, which is questionable based on his overt hatred for Nvidia) most likely draw an extra watt or two, which isn't a huge concern. In some ways this is a good thing, Apple probably pays a price premium for their chips (once again, if this is even true), which makes the other chips cheaper. The alternative is to throw the higher power consumption chips out, driving up the price for everyone.
post #24 of 229
I think that you are trading price premium and CPU power for size and thermal envelope. I think that one of the commenters on the article stated that using a C2D over the Atom significantly increases the required PCB size.
post #25 of 229
I don't think Charlie's point was really much about the 9400, more about why bother using Atom when a much more powerful cheapass Celeron would perform better, still have a realistic thermal profile for the box (since it's not a tiny laptop) and come very close in component price.

-Trouble
post #26 of 229
I think the article is a little over the top emotionally. I'm holding judgment until we're certain on MSRP. It's difficult to judge ION's value until we know its price.
post #27 of 229
The article says that the Atom TDP is 4W, plus 12-15W for the Ion chipset -- 16-20W total. The Celeron TDP is 35W, plus 12-15W for the Ion chipset -- 47-50W total.

The article is slightly deceptive in how it presents the numbers, adding the chipset power requirements to the Atom CPU power requirements, while not doing the same for the Celeron. This has the effect of making the comparison look like it is 16-20W v. 35W, whereas it is really 16-20W v. 47-50W. Put simply, one Celeron based system would consume the same amount of power as two Atom based systems. Either number is fairly low from a cost-to-run perspective. I think that the lower power consumption of the Atom-setup will help significantly reduce any cooling noise associated with keeping the components in such close proximity.

I do agree that the single core doesn't seem like a good fit. Are there going to be different versions that use single core and dual core Atoms? I also think that using this box as a regular desktop computer may be a little ambitious. From an HTPC perspective, with video-related acceleration being what it is on the Nvidia GPUs, I'm not sure that much more is needed. However, I don't view Hulu or Flash.
post #28 of 229
Most of the configuration tables I've seen suggest dual-core will be available, as well as differing amts of RAM (as yet unknown if the RAM is user-upgradeable, or soldered to the mobo)

As for a-step-above-atom version of ION.. are there any mini-ATX boards with a 9x00 GPU yet? The micro-ATX mobos with 9400 are 66% as much by themselves (no CPU/memory/HD) as some reports suggest the complete entry-level ION systems will be.

But I'm not holding my breath on the $150 entry point some rumors suggest (but very willing to be pleasantly surprised )
post #29 of 229
To be fair, TDP is not the same as power consumption. We shouldn't infer power consumption based on TDP figures.
post #30 of 229
A UK website is pre-listing the Acer Aspire Revo with prices, with a release date of 5/18/09. Unfortunately, they don't have any dual core models listed.

http://www.engadget.com/2009/04/13/a...y-18th-releas/
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