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"OLD" BR discs?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi there Well, Why buy a "old" movie on BR i was thinking of fx DieHard 1 and 2 and so, there are recorded with SD kameras back in the days. right?? If you have a good scaler or HTPC the diff between a studio upscaled BR and a locally upscaled DVD is quiet small..right? I dont think any of mine guest will se this diff. or am i wrong here??
post #2 of 23
You are wrong, most movies are shot on film, which has a higher resolution than even Blu ray is able to handle. The studios normally go back and make a new tranfer from the original film to create a new hi-def master that looks much better than anything else released before.

However, sometimes they use old transfers that aren't that great, or screw things up when they do the new transfer so it's always a good idea to check here or one of the review sites to see if the video quality is worth the expense of upgrading or buying the movie.
post #3 of 23
Most studios have been doing 2k and 4k masters for the last 5 years or so, so unless it is an OLD transfer the quality on the Blu-Ray should be excellent and a big resolution increase from the DVD.
post #4 of 23
Is this a joke?
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by raoul_duke View Post

Is this a joke?

I don't think so, but it's an object lesson in how poorly understood the art of filmmaking truly is. The vast majority of people who watch movies haven't the tiniest hint of a clue about how they come to be. And that's a big part of the reason why they have so little respect for them.
post #6 of 23
There is a weird misconception some people have that unless a movie was shot with HD cameras, then they are not truly HD.

Die Hard, apart from being over 20 years old (wow, really??) is a fantastic looking film expertly shot by Jan de Bont (of Speed and Twister fame).
post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darcy Hunter View Post

There is a weird misconception some people have that unless a movie was shot with HD cameras, then they are not truly HD.

Die Hard, apart from being over 20 years old (wow, really??) is a fantastic looking film expertly shot by Jan de Bont (of Speed and Twister fame).

Hi guys sorry for asking.... but you actually gave the perfect answer on my questions: The old analoge movies are very fine recorded and NOT upscaled in any way...thx and sorry for not being familiar with movie recording 20 years ago
post #8 of 23
Its not a matter of being familiar with "movie recording 20 years ago", its a matter of not being familiar with how movies are made at all. Other than recent films shot on HD cameras, I don't know of any films from the past not shot on film stock. I could be wrong, but I don't think any theatrically released film was shot on video, or anything like that.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnpv View Post

Its not a matter of being familiar with "movie recording 20 years ago", its a matter of not being familiar with how movies are made at all. Other than recent films shot on HD cameras, I don't know of any films from the past not shot on film stock. I could be wrong, but I don't think any theatrically released film was shot on video, or anything like that.

28 days later was.
post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnpv View Post

I could be wrong, but I don't think any theatrically released film was shot on video, or anything like that.

You're not a fan of Dogma films I guess (or other small independent productions).
post #11 of 23
I think good points are being made. It isn't the age of the film (which has resolution in excess of HD) but the care it got and has gotten in the transfer.

Art
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Sonneborn View Post

I think good points are being made. It isn't the age of the film (which has resolution in excess of HD) but the care it got and has gotten in the transfer.

Art

...and lack of care (and remastering, if any).

These questions go to a basic understanding of film v video. Anyone who was around just a few years ago and purchased an early digital camera (1 or 2 mp) readily understands the differences in film v video (not that I'm an expert). In the video world, the term "high def" really only applies to (1) video (one could philosophically argue it applies to film as well, as more info is on film than the best BD's can currently offer), and, (2) the high-def digital transfer of film to disc...although, HD can undesirably magnify some of the deterioration or grain (or other undesirables) of film.

As stated above, one can do research prior to purchasing a BD disc to see if the transfer was less than satisfactory.
post #13 of 23
Its also how the production took place.

Shooting in controlled lighting result in far better percieved PQ compared to shooting in more natural light.

Despite that they actually have the same resolution.
post #14 of 23
Alright i don't chime in much, but I feel I should here. I found this site some time ago and it has taught me a great deal. This question comes up from time to time. The answer to this question I've discovered through reading the site and coming up with through context. I am not nearly as well versed as Art, Owen, or Avical. I have not noticed a good source of information that helps new AVSers understand the nuances of film and its translation to digital media. I was wondering if some one more knowledgable than myself would be able to come up with sort of primer that could be stickied to help new comers understand these things. I could stand to learn a lot from said information as well.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Govgrim View Post

Alright i don't chime in much but I feel I should here. I found this site some time ago and it has taught me a great deal. This question comes up from time to time. The answer to this question I've discovered through reading the site and coming up with trhough context. I am not nearly as well versed as Art, Owen, or Avical. I have not noticed a good source of information that helps new AVSers understand the nuances of film and it's translation to digital media. I was wondering if some one more knowledgable than myself would be able to come up with sort of primer that could be stickied to help new comers understand these things. I could stand to learn a lot from said information as well.

I second that request.

Klaus, asked a great question that I was wondering about too. Reading the answers here let me understand part of the process.

Thanks guys,
post #16 of 23
I understand about film being of higher resolution than Blu-ray, etc., but can someone please explain why some Blu-rays are encoded at 1080i? (I noticed this while watching Short Circuit).

Thanks.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuckNaked View Post

I understand about film being of higher resolution than Blu-ray, etc., but can someone please explain why some Blu-rays are encoded at 1080i? (I noticed this while watching Short Circuit).

Thanks.

Short Circuit was an old master originally made for cable broadcast, and the studio was too cheap/lazy to remaster the movie properly.
post #18 of 23
Man, one of these threads every week...
post #19 of 23
Lots of great insight.

Does BR superiority over upscaled DVD also apply to animated movies such as Disney classics or newer Pixar films?
post #20 of 23
You mean BD OP?
post #21 of 23

Originally Posted by MSchu18 View Post

You mean BD OP?

I think the OP was chased out of this thread a long time ago.

post #22 of 23
This thread is scary. "Movie recording" ugh. I understand that not everyone is an expert or really knows much at all about anything but the first thing one should learn after reading, writing, and basic arithmetic is how to use Google. This is one of the first lnks that popped up after typing in "motion picture:"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill McNeal View Post

Lots of great insight.
Does BR superiority over upscaled DVD also apply to animated movies such as Disney classics or newer Pixar films?

Bill:

I would recommend using our advance search engine, title search only option and words like "animation", "classics", "B&W" any general topic you have a question on relative to blu ray and you'll find past discussions. When I used the advance search engine, title search only option for this forum with the word "classic", I found this thread:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1401642/100-years-of-universal-restoring-the-classics

As I suggested in your other thread, reviewing the PQ sticky thread would yield information too.

Ron
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