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Irish Copper Top Tavern & Theater--An extremely modest build!! - Page 4

post #91 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Need a little help if anyone is here and or awake(well atleast here) I was staining my cabinets for behind the bar and I flicked a little (oil based)stain on the drywall that has been primered. So I went to lay my brush down to wipe the few drops up and the brush went flying and splattered the wall with stain........what do I do? Can I just put another coat of drywall primer on and all will be fine or am I going to have problems since the primer is latex and the stain is oil based? Anyone ever done this (I highly doubt anyone is this dumb) or had any experience with something similar? Please help a noob
post #92 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Need a little help if anyone is here and or awake(well atleast here) I was staining my cabinets for behind the bar and I flicked a little (oil based)stain on the drywall that has been primered. So I went to lay my brush down to wipe the few drops up and the brush went flying and splattered the wall with stain........what do I do? Can I just put another coat of drywall primer on and all will be fine or am I going to have problems since the primer is latex and the stain is oil based? Anyone ever done this (I highly doubt anyone is this dumb) or had any experience with something similar? Please help a noob

Do you have any KILLZ? I would try that on the spots, if not just re prime it, you may need 2 coats depending on how bad it is. Will your paint in that area be a light color or a darker color?
post #93 of 1361
might want to sand the area a bit too (after it dries) before repriming (killz).
post #94 of 1361
You're not the first and certainly wont be the last for such things... As far as what to do the guys above got you pretty well covered.
post #95 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. I dont have any Killz but can get some if all else fails. I will try a light sanding and then another coat of the drywall primer I used and see what happens.
post #96 of 1361
Thread Starter 
On another note heres the new seats....well atleast them in their boxes and then in their plastic until the theater is ready for them......I have them in the living room upstairs to fight off temptation but also so that I can see them and maybe they will add a little motivation to get things moving on those "sluggish" days


post #97 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Maybe you can all help me out with another issue. I had to stain 4 cabinet doors and 3 of the 4 look about the same but the 4th looks alot darker. Can i do anything to fix this or am I stuck? I left the stain on all the panels the same amount of time and then used a rag to wipe the excess off but this one door (actually just the center panel) is darker than the others.
post #98 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Maybe you can all help me out with another issue. I had to stain 4 cabinet doors and 3 of the 4 look about the same but the 4th looks alot darker. Can i do anything to fix this or am I stuck? I left the stain on all the panels the same amount of time and then used a rag to wipe the excess off but this one door (actually just the center panel) is darker than the others.

First can you live with it or is it way to noticable? Second, Is the darker one too dark for you? It will be easier to make them all darker than bring the darker one back to being lighter unless you sand it back down to bare wood and use a conditioner on it. You didn't mention if you used conditioner on all of these or not. You can also strip it down and shoot it with a spray gun to achive a lighter coat but now your getting way deep into it.
Any pics of it?
Also did you sand all of the cabinets with the same steps and with the same grain of sandpaper each time? You can achive a darker color by only going up to 150 coarsness whereas by going to 420 (80, 100, 150, 220, 320, 420) you will achieve a lighter stain. This is in reference to the first coat only.
post #99 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSWHO View Post

First can you live with it or is it way to noticable? Second, Is the darker one too dark for you? It will be easier to make them all darker than bring the darker one back to being lighter unless you sand it back down to bare wood and use a conditioner on it. You didn't mention if you used conditioner on all of these or not. You can also strip it down and shoot it with a spray gun to achive a lighter coat but now your getting way deep into it.
Any pics of it?
Also did you sand all of the cabinets with the same steps and with the same grain of sandpaper each time? You can achive a darker color by only going up to 150 coarsness whereas by going to 420 (80, 100, 150, 220, 320, 420) you will achieve a lighter stain. This is in reference to the first coat only.

Well I will have to live with it since I dont want to strip it down and all that jazz. It is a little darker than I wanted. Maybe I will 2nd coat the others and just go with the darker color. I sanded 80-100-150-220-320 and used conditioner on all of them. This one has a grey tint to it. I also made sure I stirred the stain before I started each door. Oh well it is for behind the bar which is not well lit nor a very wide open space so to look down and notice shouldnt be a problem.
post #100 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Not the best pic due to lighting and the flash but hopefully you can see the difference
post #101 of 1361
Iusteve,

Damn you have been busy - nice work! Seems that "1/2-wall-bar" is going nowhere soon, 2 layers of MDF !!

I am about to post those additional EQ. closet room photos for you on my thread - thanks for the patience!
post #102 of 1361
I've had similar experience when doing some staining. Even though you stir when getting to the bottom of a stain you tend to get a darker pigment sometimes. I would just try to make the other doors a little darker.
post #103 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Iusteve,

Damn you have been busy - nice work! Seems that "1/2-wall-bar" is going nowhere soon, 2 layers of MDF !!

I am about to post those additional EQ. closet room photos for you on my thread - thanks for the patience!

Haha I wish Oman.....actually if you read my first post of this thread I had done alot of work ahead of starting this thread so I am just catching up the pics day by day.....the cabinet stain issue is current but I have more photos to catch up sometime soon..thanks for stopping bye
post #104 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

I've had similar experience when doing some staining. Even though you stir when getting to the bottom of a stain you tend to get a darker pigment sometimes. I would just try to make the other doors a little darker.

Actually I am only abut 20% into the can so it confuses me a little. I could understand if I were at the bottom. I may just have to go with the darker color against my will Thanks for the input, any help is greatly appreciated.
post #105 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Not the best pic due to lighting and the flash but hopefully you can see the difference

IMO, I would just 2nd coat the others, it doesn't look that much darker however I am going based on this picture with flash. Looks good. Did you get the unfinished cabinets at the big box stores ? Looks good eitherway.
post #106 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Yea Menards had the unfinished oak on sale and I grabbed them. I am on a tight budget so I couldnt afford to splurge on anything over the top. Should I just wait until they are good and dry and slap a 2nd coat on them? And should I recoat them all or just the lighter 3? And what about sanding in between coats? The can say s dont sand between but others have said too.
post #107 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Yea Menards had the unfinished oak on sale and I grabbed them. I am on a tight budget so I couldnt afford to splurge on anything over the top. Should I just wait until they are good and dry and slap a 2nd coat on them? And should I recoat them all or just the lighter 3? And what about sanding in between coats? The can say s dont sand between but others have said too.

I do not sand them between coats of stain only between coats of poly. But if you do I would only suggest using a 000 steel wool and do it lightly. I would only do the lighter 3 to see if you can match it up to the darker one then go from there. If your using a rag I would only wait 30 min to an hour. if your using a brush which tends to soak the wood, I would wait a lot longer especially if your going to sand the stain.
post #108 of 1361
Thread Starter 
I used a foam brush then wiped the excess with a rag. I wont sand between coats. I am going to wai until they are totally dry and take them upstairs to some "normal" light and compare them and go from there. Regarding the poly. Did you use an actual polyurethane or something else? ANd what did you sand with between coats and how many coats?
post #109 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Yea Menards had the unfinished oak on sale and I grabbed them. I am on a tight budget so I couldnt afford to splurge on anything over the top. Should I just wait until they are good and dry and slap a 2nd coat on them? And should I recoat them all or just the lighter 3? And what about sanding in between coats? The can say s dont sand between but others have said too.

Iusteve,

I see you bought your cabinets at Menards. I am also shopping and think I am considering the same ones. Are these the unfinished Oak cabinets that they keep in stock?

For comparison I noticed they had a 30" base cabinet for ~ $90.00, everyone else wanted $100 ~ $120.00. To me the construction quality seems very similair (oak fronts, and particle board sides/back). Are you happy with the overall sturdiness and construction quality?
post #110 of 1361
Iusteve,

Don't mean to interrupt; but my 2 cents worth

I just finished staining and top-coating my doors. Once I was happy with the staining results. For a topcoat: I went with 2 coats of oil-based-satin polyurethane, and sanded between with "00" fine steel wool.
post #111 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

I used a foam brush then wiped the excess with a rag. I wont sand between coats. I am going to wai until they are totally dry and take them upstairs to some "normal" light and compare them and go from there. Regarding the poly. Did you use an actual polyurethane or something else? ANd what did you sand with between coats and how many coats?

I use either the oil or water based polys. I use the water based which dries faster and no odor on stuff like cabinet doors that wouldn't get too much abuse. I wouldn't use water based on let's say a wood floor with dogs (nail scratches). I also use 000 steel wool between coats of poly. I normally do at least 2 coats on oil and minimum 3 coats with the water based poly or more because it dries faster. Anything after 3 coats really depends on how shiny you want it.
post #112 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Iusteve,

I see you bought your cabinets at Menards. I am also shopping and think I am considering the same ones. Are these the unfinished Oak cabinets that they keep in stock?

For comparison I noticed they had a 30" base cabinet for ~ $90.00, everyone else wanted $100 ~ $120.00. To me the construction quality seems very similair (oak fronts, and particle board sides/back). Are you happy with the overall sturdiness and construction quality?

Yep those are the ones. I also bought them due to the price and the same basic ones at lowes for $25-$40 more per cabinet for the same ones. They are very well built IMO. Now they arent solid oak all the way around or the quality of Maple or the higher end cabinets but that said for the price they are great. I got them because it is a basement and it is a bar. I would use them for the main kitchen or anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuzed2 View Post

Iusteve,

Don't mean to interrupt; but my 2 cents worth

I just finished staining and top-coating my doors. Once I was happy with the staining results. For a topcoat: I went with 2 coats of oil-based-satin polyurethane, and sanded between with "00" fine steel wool.

Thanks for the heads up. I was trying to decide if I should use a satin or whatever the next level of gloss is up? Whats your opinion on the satin? How glossy is it? And how hard do you sand in between coats? I assume that after the first coat dries you sand then recoat then your done?
post #113 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSWHO View Post

I use either the oil or water based polys. I use the water based which dries faster and no odor on stuff like cabinet doors that wouldn't get too much abuse. I wouldn't use water based on let's say a wood floor with dogs (nail scratches). I also use 000 steel wool between coats of poly. I normally do at least 2 coats on oil and minimum 3 coats with the water based poly or more because it dries faster. Anything after 3 coats really depends on how shiny you want it.

Can I do water based over an oil based stain? I thought I had to use oil based over oil etc.
post #114 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Can I do water based over an oil based stain? I thought I had to use oil based over oil etc.

Most go over both oil & water based stains plus it can go over bare wood, paint and wallpaper. I use the Miniwax water based Polycrylic. it comes in satin, semi and gloss. I used them all but like semi the most, seems to match my taste for sheen.
post #115 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LSWHO View Post

Most go over both oil & water based stains plus it can go over bare wood, paint and wallpaper. I use the Miniwax water based Polycrylic. it comes in satin, semi and gloss. I used them all but like semi the most, seems to match my taste for sheen.

That was my thining....hit the middle of the gloss chart and be happy. I will pick some up at big blue when I go as well as some steel wool. I may try the 2nd coat on the doors tonight and see how that goes but am afraid that I will ruin them. We will have to see. How long should I wait to poly after I stain the doors? Days, weeks ?

Also I lightly sanded my stain on paint goof then put some more of the primer I used over it and am letting it dry. I hope that does the trick but I guess I can always try another coat and or some Killz. I just dont want the damn spots of stain to show through
post #116 of 1361
Copper? Commercial bronze is better!




post #117 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Well I have to say that came out of left field.......but to that I say to each his own. One man drinks beer the other mixed drinks is either of them wrong?

What is the actual material for the bar front? And is the top the same? I cant tell in the pic. Copper was the pre-chosen material for me and I am VERY happy with it so far. Also why didnt you take the metal panels (I assume its your bar) closer to the floor?
post #118 of 1361
Sorry, you apparently didn't get the humor. I came across your project and was surprised to see someone else want a copper top bar.

It was part of my design all along and many people gave me funny looks.

The material is all the same (panels and bar top.) There is also built in storage benches with the same pattern as the front of the bar in a different spot in the basement.

Commercial bronze is 90% copper, and 10% zinc (alloy 220). The color is between orange copper and yellow brass. It's use is primarily decorative. It is tougher than pure copper with wear and tear. These were pictures during construction that I happened to have at work and accessible. They do appear to be different material, but it is exactly the same, from the same heat number. The top was a 36" x 120" sheet, so it is one solid piece, no seams anywhere.

The reason for the panels was to tie it in to the storage benches. What is not seen is the 2"od tube foot rail that sits below the panels. It is also alloy 220 bronze.
post #119 of 1361
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dannynoonan View Post

Sorry, you apparently didn't get the humor. I came across your project and was surprised to see someone else want a copper top bar.

It was part of my design all along and many people gave me funny looks.

The material is all the same (panels and bar top.) There is also built in storage benches with the same pattern as the front of the bar in a different spot in the basement.

Commercial bronze is 80% copper, and 20% zinc (alloy 220). The color is between orange copper and yellow brass. It's use is primarily decorative. It is tougher than pure copper with wear and tear. These were pictures during construction that I happened to have at work and accessible. They do appear to be different material, but it is exactly the same, from the same heat number. The top was a 36" x 120" sheet, so it is one solid piece, no seams anywhere.

The reason for the panels was to tie it in to the storage benches. What is not seen is the 2"od tube foot rail that sits below the panels. It is also alloy 220 bronze.


Its all good humor is great I just wasnt sure where you were going with it.... Whatever bar top the bottom line is that it is a bar. I plan on an epoxy pour over the copper so durability is not an issue. As for your base the storage benches make sense as well as the foot rail. I couldnt actually see the bar top that well so I couldnt tell if it was the same material thats all. Looks good and I am sure you get alot of use out of it. Why were you sruprised to see someone else using copper?
post #120 of 1361
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Yep those are the ones. I also bought them due to the price and the same basic ones at lowes for $25-$40 more per cabinet for the same ones. They are very well built IMO. Now they arent solid oak all the way around or the quality of Maple or the higher end cabinets but that said for the price they are great. I got them because it is a basement and it is a bar. I would use them for the main kitchen or anything.


Thanks for the heads up. I was trying to decide if I should use a satin or whatever the next level of gloss is up? Whats your opinion on the satin? How glossy is it? And how hard do you sand in between coats? I assume that after the first coat dries you sand then recoat then your done?

I found Satin to be just right for me. Just a little bit of sheen, any glossier and I feel it takes away from the natural look of the wood (and could also cause reflections..?). Yes I just rub the surface down by hand with steel wool grade "00" between the two topcoats, and yes I used only two coats on my doors.
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