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Possible Permanent Backlight Bleed Fix for LCD TVs and Monitors w/ disclaimer

post #1 of 111
Thread Starter 

Due to the nature of the method used in this fix, please use caution and have patience while attempting. Take care not to use too much force or you may damage your screen.

 

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EDIT 1/17/13: If you are considering returning your set due to your unhappiness with backlight bleed, clouding, flashlighting, etc., please feel free to try the method I have listed. Keep reading for some success stories. Ignore the haters who claim to be know-it-alls. You can't argue with factual evidence of improvement, or success stories (with pics). I have had this set for FOUR YEARS now, did the 'fix' I listed in my OP the second week I had it, and the bleed has never returned - to this day my set still has nice uniform blacks. So feel free to attempt this method (esp. if you are going to return it anyhow), and don't let know-it-alls like Rogo, Stratosphere, and Extreme_Boky scare you away from attempting. Not believing in something is one thing, but calling people idiots and claiming their methods are garbage (especially when I have SEEN this work), is childish and their posts should be ignored. Knowing that there is potential for this method to fix your bleeding issues, please take care and have patience while doing this.

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So, after bringing my new Samsung LN40A630 LCD TV home a couple weeks ago, I immediately noticed backlight bleeding (a.k.a. flashlighting) from all four corners when my room was dark. It was bad enough to the point where I wanted to return it - however, it was the stores last one and the model has been discontinued, and I wanted to see what I could do to lessen/fix the problem.

Seeing nothing but complaints and no real solutions (outside of turn your backlight/brightness down) to minimize/eliminate the bleeding, I decided to take a more personal and direct approach.

Once it got dark outside (big window in my room), I turned out all the lights in my room and fired the TV up. I have it hooked to my PC so I can show a pure black background (this can be achieved other ways). Now I could see the 4 corners with all their bleeding glory.

I proceeded to do a combination of light tapping/finger massaging around the areas where the bleed was, slowly moving towards the bleeding areas, and applying varying amounts of pressure. I never actually pressed or tapped hard, but hard enough to see the panel change from black to white (possibly the backlight shining through?) where I was pressing/tapping. After some time, the backlight bleed seemed to diminish to the point where I could say it's completely gone.

Now, I didn't find any definitive methods like this anywhere online before I tried it on my own TV. I was talking about it with a friend earlier, and searched around again to find a post on NCIX Forums (quoted at the bottom) that contained almost the EXACT same information and results that I achieved by doing this. I also read somewhere that a guy with a new Sony LCD TV had a huge cloud on the screen, and firmly pushing on it made it go away, and it never came back.

I encourage those that seek a fix for their backlight bleeding problems to try this! As long as you don't press too hard, the worst case scenario is you have some fingerprint smudges on your screen and it didn't help. Remember, be firm, but don't bruise your screen from excessive force. You need to be able to see the color shift when you press/tap.

I'd like everyone that attempts this fix to post back in this thread with your results. Before/after pictures would be great too! Unfortunately I didn't get any pictures of how bad it was when I brought it home, but I'll try to get a good picture tonight of how good it looks now (if my camera is up to par, that is).



I also realize that there could be multiple reasons for backlight bleed, and this fix may not work for those cases where it's due to other variables (such as heat, etc.)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott O View Post

I got a new Acer AL2616WD (manufacture date 02/2007), and it had a very noticeable area of backlight bleed at the top of the screen, roughly 1/3rd of the way in from the left. Watching a movie, it was quite distracting. But I fixed it, and now it's virtually unnoticeable.

As everyone probably knows, the LCD panel is flexible, and quite sensitive to pressure. If you touch your finger to the screen lightly, you'll see the colours distort. For this reason, it has to be very "delicately" mounted in its frame.

If you press lightly along the edges of this Acer monitor, you'll see backlight shine around, more in some areas where there's no support behind, and less where I presume the screen is clamped/pressed into place against the frame. You only need the tiniest warp in how it's mounted, and backlight can shine around. I'm sure that shipping could very well cause such a tiny warp, just due to shifting.

The area of backlight bleed on my monitor was in a place where the panel was more flexible (i.e. a point where it wasn't fixed to the frame), so I tried tapping my finger lightly just to the left and to the right of the area, to see if it wouldn't adjust itself in its frame. After all,

Lo and behold, the tapping worked. I only had to tap very lightly, starting close to the bleed area and ending about 10 cm away, and now the backlight bleed is virtually non-existant.

So, before you send your monitor back due to a "manufacturing default", when, in fact, it may only have shifted slightly during shipping, you might want to just try this.

I hope this helps!
Scott.

Scott's original thread over at NCIX Forums can be found here.


Edited by id0l - 1/20/13 at 10:13am
post #2 of 111
You shouldn't be touching your fingers/hands directly on the screen. If you are going to try this, you should use a microfiber cloth.
post #3 of 111
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkcohen View Post

You shouldn't be touching your fingers/hands directly on the screen. If you are going to try this, you should use a microfiber cloth.

Do the oils on your fingertips damage the screen in some way? I have nothing against using a microfiber cloth (obviously). It's pretty normal to get fingerprints on a TV/monitor, especially if you have kids, but as long as you use the right type of LCD screen cleaner, you shouldn't have problems. I never have, anyway.
post #4 of 111
I have a Samsung ln46a550 lcd tv. My top two corners of the screen initially seemed to be darker rather than lighter when viewing bright scenes. I thought it was caused in part by when I had recently lifted it and moved it.

After trying the screen tap, I then noticed light bleed on dark screens. However, in bright scenes, the screen was much improved and almost completely uniform. So I wasn't sure which problem was the lesser evil or why this changed.

The solution for all of this? My wife and I simply picked up the set (one hand under the panel and one on top) and moved it to another stand. I figured that, when moving it initially, I may have done something which caused a shift to the pressure points on the top which affected uniformity. When I reconnected the TV, I found that, even after running it for an hour, the bleeding was much less...so much less that I don't care anymore about it. I can now sit in peace. On bright screens, there is some minor darkening at the top corners but, again, it is much less and smaller than before (only about a square inch and a half as opposed to three inches). Same with bleed on dark scenes.

Tapping and screen massaging did not fix my problem, nor did loosening the top panel screws, but I am glad it is better now, for whatever reason! We'll see if it lasts. The set is only a month old, manufactured January 2009.
post #5 of 111
I gave this a shot, but it didn't make a bit of difference for me.
post #6 of 111
I recently purchased the Samsung 55" 800 and noticed some flashlighting/clouding. Prior to even reading this thread I decided to give this a try and noticed a dramatic improvement. So much so that I can only just see the problem on really black screens in a completely darkened room. I'm quite happy with my TV now and saved myself the expense of having another one delivered.
post #7 of 111
I can now start my own LCD screen massage business, and clean up.
post #8 of 111
honestly I can't figure out why a company like some advertised here to fix pixels dont Learn how to fix flashlight and clouding issues. If the had even a 90% success rate they would make hundreds of thousands of dollars a year considering every single freaking LCD and LCD led tv has one or the other or both.
post #9 of 111
I recently purchased a Panasonic TC-L37D2 that had major bleeding/flashlighting in two spots along the bottom edge, as well as the lower right corner. It was so bad that even after adjusting the backlight and brightness levels down the spots clearly stood out during a dark scene. I returned the TV and received a replacement, which unfortunately had the same problem, only this time it was only in the lower left corner of the screen. It was a very large area, however, and was very distracting. The rest of the screen had flawless uniformity and the TV's black level performance was excellent, which made the spot even more noticeable. I was very disappointed because the display unit that I saw at a local retailer had no bleeding/flashlighting whatsoever.

I was at the point where I had about made the decision to return the TV for a refund this time because I simply couldn't ignore the flaw, when I ran across this thread and figured what the heck. Might as well give it a try before I send it back. Well, to my surprise, after "massaging" the screen a bit, the bleeding was noticeably less prominent. I continued to work on the area and it would alternately get a bit better, and sometimes a bit worse. Finally, I decided to start tapping on the entire affected area, and to my complete shock the bleeding/flashlighting completely disappeared. I have been watching the TV for over a week now and the bleeding/flashlighting has not returned. Thanks for the suggestion!
post #10 of 111
Does anyone care to elaborate on how exactly your tapping on the screen?
I've tried tapping with a microfiber cloth.
With about as much force as youd get if you dropped a pencil eraser side down from about an inch off the ground. Just a tiny thud.

But I don't see a difference. How hard are you tapping? With just the point of your finger?
Where exactly do you do the tapping? how many times, etc.
post #11 of 111
This is a terrible "fix" and you should just stop trying to "fix" anything this way. Maybe it would work on a smaller screen almost by accident, but it's probably not going to work since the flashlighting problem is not cause by the LCD not being "pushed hard enough" at the factory.

You are so much more likely to cause damage than you are to fix anything it's not even funny.
post #12 of 111
This works guys. Amazing.
post #13 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by id0l View Post
Do the oils on your fingertips damage the screen in some way? I have nothing against using a microfiber cloth (obviously). It's pretty normal to get fingerprints on a TV/monitor, especially if you have kids, but as long as you use the right type of LCD screen cleaner, you shouldn't have problems. I never have, anyway.
The only "right" type of LCD cleaner is a microfiber cloth dampened with water (preferably distilled). And any LCD that you have to tap or press lightly to "fix" has some serious quality issues. Kinda makes you wonder what else will go wrong. These aren't glass CRTs. Just my $.02.
post #14 of 111
I think this idea has some merit - I watched http://revision3.com/hdnation/hdtv-dissection and they show the intricate layers of the LCD, diffusion layers and the LED backlighting during disassembly of a Samsung 8000 series LED backlit LCD TV

What I think is happening is - it is not the LCD that is at fault, but slight differences in the spacing between the LCD and the remaining diffusion layers beneath.

I think that by "massaging" the LCD, people are changing these subtle spacings, and causing a resulting change in the brightness of the cloud or flashlighting section of the screen.

This makes some sense to me, people have exchanged LCD TV's with the same make and model, and the flashlighting is different, in different sections of the screen. I believe that the diffusion layers can probably shift during shipping or be slightly different because of manufacturing tolerances. Heck, hanging my Samsung on the wall vs using the pedestal stand altered my bright spots.

Worth taking some gentle time to explore.

Rick
post #15 of 111
I bought a new Samsung 55 UA6000 model just few days back, has some clouding around 2 bottom corners. Tried tapping fingers and massaging did't help. Is there any specific way to do so, thanks
post #16 of 111
I still haven't had a chance to play around myself...I was thinking of trying maybe a small paint roller, the type that you would use around trim, and lightly rolling around the screen. Just a thought...without the paint of course.
post #17 of 111
....or just keep tapping and paint rolling until you really damage the screen and then send it back as "defective".
post #18 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricketts223 View Post

I still haven't had a chance to play around myself...I was thinking of trying maybe a small paint roller, the type that you would use around trim, and lightly rolling around the screen. Just a thought...without the paint of course.

Or hey, if that doesn't work, just try hitting it harder. Maybe kick it a few times. I read on the internet that kicking things usually fixes them.

Or maybe you should try the paint roller full of black paint. It would certainly make the screen display those deep blacks you're looking for and you wouldn't have to worry about backlight bleed anymore.

Or maybe you could smear it with peanut butter and call it Nancy....

[/sarcasm]
post #19 of 111
Its so easy to spot plasma owners...just can't help themselves Why can't we all just get along?
post #20 of 111
The backlight bleed fix mentioned in this thread can do more harm than good. Backlight bleed is a function of:
- backlight source quality
- diffuser quality and its alignment in regards to BEF’s and backlight source
- BEF's quality and their alignment in regards to LCD panel and diffuser
- how good the backlight source is "covered" at points where it emits most of the photons (for example, at both ends of each CCFL tube in CCFL lit TV's) - see the picture I attached: arrow No 2 point to properly blocked CCFL tube end. Arrow No 1 shows the “leak” at the point where the CCFL emits most of the light WHICH IS ALSO not of the same colour as the rest of the CCFL tube length – so this is “double trouble”… and could cause bad bleed. Now, if the diffuser / BEF’s and LCD panel go back nicely (careful assembly), they will block the “crack” that arrow No 1 shows and block the bleed. This is rarely the case in mass production these days… I’d like to mention that edge lit TV sets with only 10’s of millimetres in thickness have to compromise a lot in this department…

To be perfectly fair, it is possible to introduce a mechanically - induced “bias” that will alter how easy / difficult the voltage rotates the LCD panel pixels…. but this is temporary bias that will disappear with time. So, it is better to leave the LCD panel alone and not introduce any stress.
Boky
LL
post #21 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme_Boky View Post

The backlight bleed fix mentioned in this thread can do more harm than good. Backlight bleed is a function of:
- backlight source quality
- diffuser quality and its alignment in regards to BEF's and backlight source
- BEF's quality and their alignment in regards to LCD panel and diffuser
- how good the backlight source is "covered" at points where it emits most of the photons (for example, at both ends of each CCFL tube in CCFL lit TV's) - see the picture I attached: arrow No 2 point to properly blocked CCFL tube end. Arrow No 1 shows the leak at the point where the CCFL emits most of the light WHICH IS ALSO not of the same colour as the rest of the CCFL tube length - so this is double trouble and could cause bad bleed. Now, if the diffuser / BEF's and LCD panel go back nicely (careful assembly), they will block the crack that arrow No 1 shows and block the bleed. This is rarely the case in mass production these days I'd like to mention that edge lit TV sets with only 10's of millimetres in thickness have to compromise a lot in this department

To be perfectly fair, it is possible to introduce a mechanically - induced bias that will alter how easy / difficult the voltage rotates the LCD panel pixels. but this is temporary bias that will disappear with time. So, it is better to leave the LCD panel alone and not introduce any stress.
Boky

Agreed, as I stated above.
post #22 of 111
so what do you think we shoud do, bought a tv for $2000 and keep looking at bright corners thinking its unavoidable. They should advertise light bleeding as one of the features so consumer could live with that. Even replacement is a big headache when you know that new unit possibily would have same trouble
post #23 of 111
Sorry to play devil's advoacate but anybody with any sense knows that by massaging a screen it will not change the pixels to block light "leakage".

It "leaks". There is no fix for this except buying a full LED set or plasma.
post #24 of 111
Bumping this one up. For those with clouding problems, may want to consider this.,
post #25 of 111
Bumping this up further. For people in drought-stricken areas, you might want to consider hiring a local rain dancer.
post #26 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Bumping this up further. For people in drought-stricken areas, you might want to consider hiring a local rain dancer.

? I don't get it... This thread actually helped some of the members.
post #27 of 111
Rain dancing has been known to "cause" rain, too.

Of course, occasionally rain dancing "causes" monsoons.

Your mileage may vary.
post #28 of 111
Sigh.. If it'll help, I tried massaging it for like 10-15 minutes. I don't know if it did improve... but didn't change a bit.

I'm scared that it may damage the set, but what the hell the clouding's already bad as it is.
post #29 of 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliCool View Post

I'm scared that it may damage the set, .

See, you're making the point I made in June:

This is a terrible "fix" and you should just stop trying to "fix" anything this way. Maybe it would work on a smaller screen almost by accident, but it's probably not going to work since the flashlighting problem is not cause by the LCD not being "pushed hard enough" at the factory.

You are so much more likely to cause damage than you are to fix anything it's not even funny.


But, hey, people like to believe their selecting the Lotto numbers increases their chances of winning, that putting on rally caps helps their team score runs, etc. etc. There is a powerful action bias. Never mind that you might destroy a perfectly working TV with a factory flaw. You just might convince yourself you've mitigated the problem. Heck, maybe you'll even do that in some incredibly rare cases. Maybe.

I'm heading out to do a rain dance in the meantime.
post #30 of 111
I'd even go as far as saying this thread should be removed, considering that some newbies might come here and experiment with this 'fix' and end up damaging their new TVs. The last thing you want to do to an LCD is place enough pressure on the screen to get it to turn white. This is not a 'fix', it's TV abuse.
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