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The UN-Theater Build - Page 60

post #1771 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkship View Post

Oh great Master Debater and Fornicator of Matriarchs, I believe if you get in your Way Back machine and revisit post # 12 of this very thread, you would see that poor Doug is only quoting your very own carefully and laboriously crafted prose.



When people start quoting - or recognizing - random snippets from posts I made years ago, I have to wonder if some one other than just myself might need to look into adjusting their medication levels! It was painful enough to live through once, I am NOT going to intentionally revisit my HT past!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BllDo View Post

That may be, but it still doesn't explain why.

Amen!

post #1772 of 1780
Can I get an "Amen!' from the choir? Or should I say Peanut Gallery?
post #1773 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Disclosure & Fair Warning: this post has nothing to do with HT or mold, and is more than a bit nostalgic and sentimental, so feel free to skip ahead to the next post where the build story and sarcasm will resume in earnest. With credit (and apologies) to Bill Bryson.


While all this destruction and mold remediation and rebuilding and furnace replacing was going on - and serving as a wonderful distraction I might add - life happened, so to speak, as it so often does.


It was a simple thing that brought this home to me. One of my kids - the youngest - was reveling in the unseasonably tropical (i.e. above freezing) temperatures and, feeling a bit giddy, asked pleadingly, with her best puppy eyes, if I would "please, please, pretty please Daddy" go for a walk around the block with her. I almost said no, when it occurred to me: my baby would never again be exactly "13 and a quarter," and before long she will not even want to be seen in public with me anymore, so I better seize the moment while I could. I've already let so many of them slip by.


To be honest what really brought this realization home to me was something that had been weighing on my mind ever since our son abruptly announced that he was bored with college and had enlisted. Having him go away to college was one thing, but this was something else entirely.


Before we knew it he was gone. First to boot camp, then to Marine field training, and finally, inevitably, to the Middle East and the war zone.


Meanwhile, his mother and I are left to feel his absence and to plumb the depths of the full meaning of the word 'worry,' especially in the dead of night or when a car we don't recognize drives into our driveway.


I hadn't really expected it to be like this, to be honest, because for a few years before he left he wasn't really here, if you know what I mean, and even on the rare occasions that he was physically living here he still wasn't really here in any meaningful sense, so much as he seemed to just sort of appear every now and again to empty out the frig, remind me how old and clueless I was, and ask if he could use the car.


Now that he is gone I can't tell you how much I miss having him complain that we never have anything good to eat ("all we have are ingredients - where's the food?!") or taunt me with some of his favorite Monty Python lines ("Your mother was a hamster, and your father smelled of ELDERBERRIES!!") And I see now I had it all wrong, and that even when he wasn't here, he really was here. If you know what I mean. And now he's not here at all.


On the rare occasions when we get to speak with him now that he is "in the sandbox" he still manages to defy understanding, like when we told him that we were renovating the entire basement, including his room, so that it would be much nicer (and less moldy). Instead of being excited, as I thought he would be, he was upset. I guess I didn't fully appreciated how unsettling it is to have your life turned upside down, with nothing familiar and stable anywhere except for his memory of home, so the thought of his room also being turned upside down as well didn't thrill him. I know he'll love it when - please, God - he actually comes home, but in the meantime it doesn't help a father's nerves to think he has unintentionally added more baggage to a son's already heavy load.


I was contemplating this - again - just the other day as I was moving some of his stuff from one part of the basement to another and I happened upon his old baby blanket and it started me thinking about all the forgotten yesterdays it represents. The really tough part, I suppose, is accepting not just that he is not here, or even that is is 'over there', but that the boy he was is gone forever.


I would give anything to have him them both back, safe and sound. But life doesn't work that way. Kids grow up, and move away and as much as we might want to, we can't always protect them or watch over them. And it all happens much quicker than you might think. "I don't remember growing older. When did they?"


I know this has nothing whatsoever to do with home theaters or construction, but it has a lot to do with home and loved ones and, after all, you can't really have a home theater without a home, and a house is never more a home than when we share it with those we love.


Enough rambling. My apologies, but I did warn you, after all. Please remember to say a prayer for all the brave young men and women serving our country, especially those in harm's way. They deserve that much from us anyway, and more. So very much more.


And those of you with young kids still at home ... hold them close and share your time with them while you can, even when they drive you to the edge of your sanity, or beyond. They grow up so quickly and are gone, sometimes to very distant and dangerous places. And there are no do-overs.


Home Theaters will wait for us. Our important little projects will wait. Our kids won't. They grow up in the blink of an eye and are gone out of our lives and into their own.


And now, if you'll excuse me, I have to go for a walk around the block with a very special young lady.

As a Noobe to this forum and HT building, I have wandered into your blog, life essay, ramblings and have been laughing, and amazed at your ability to forge ahead and maintain some semblance of sanity, whatever that is.

And then I came to this post, and read, as I have so far after ignoring your warning(s), and am so glad I did and have, and will continue to. I will not rush ahead to the end, to see your un-completed HT, or to glimpse other words of wisdom and/or sarcasm.

After reading your heartfelt sharing I hope your walk with your daughter lasted a lifetime, and that she never has been ashamed to be seem with you, and that your son returned to your lives and home safe and sound.

A toast to the young men and women serving to keep us safe.

Salud! Scull! Prosit!

And Mr. Bryson shall not require an apology, but will modestly accept the credit. wink.gif

John
Edited by john171 - 9/19/13 at 1:40pm
post #1774 of 1780
Thread Starter 


Wow, that's a blast from the past kinda post! I had pretty much forgotten about that post, although I sure remember that time of life. Being of a parent of a kid on deployment can be hard.

Well, I won't spoil the "excitement" << cough, cough!! >> for you by telling you how this build adventure turns out, but four and a half years since that post and at least all the kids are alive and well. The lad returned safely from his deployment, and after some more schooling and exerting tremendous effort to avoid helping me with the basement project, he is doing well, with a good job and - most recently - found a girl foolish enough to accept his proposal. He'll be married next year, assuming the poor girl doesn't come to her senses before then.

My youngest daughter - the one I mentioned in that post - is now 17 going on 30, and a senior in high school. Amazingly, she will still go on walks with me, at least when none of her friends are around. The other kid is in college, and will only go on walks with me if I offer an attractive incentive. Amazing what kids will do for car & technology privileges! She is right at that age where she cannot stand to listen to anything the Auld Fella has to say, so I think I'll put this sign up in her room.




Oh, and a word of warning: any more time spent reading this thread is definitely time you'll never get back. Consider yourself warned!
post #1775 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post



Wow, that's a blast from the past kinda post! I had pretty much forgotten about that post, although I sure remember that time of life. Being of a parent of a kid on deployment can be hard.

Well, I won't spoil the "excitement" << cough, cough!! >> for you by telling you how this build adventure turns out, but four and a half years since that post and at least all the kids are alive and well. The lad returned safely from his deployment, and after some more schooling and exerting tremendous effort to avoid helping me with the basement project, he is doing well, with a good job and - most recently - found a girl foolish enough to accept his proposal. He'll be married next year, assuming the poor girl doesn't come to her senses before then.

My youngest daughter - the one I mentioned in that post - is now 17 going on 30, and a senior in high school. Amazingly, she will still go on walks with me, at least when none of her friends are around. The other kid is in college, and will only go on walks with me if I offer an attractive incentive. Amazing what kids will do for car & technology privileges! She is right at that age where she cannot stand to listen to anything the Auld Fella has to say, so I think I'll put this sign up in her room.




Oh, and a word of warning: any more time spent reading this thread is definitely time you'll never get back. Consider yourself warned!

As a wise man once said:

AD: "It's times like this that I wish I had listened to what my mother said!"

FP: "What did she say?"

AD: "I don't know, I didn't listen!"



So in that vein I will ignore your warnings once again, and continue to read you running commentary, even though your attempt to give away the end result did just the opposite, it's the pictures, the conversations you have with your fellow HTers, and probably yourself, surely you do, I do since I'm usually the only one who really understands me, or even listens... rolleyes.gif

Glad to hear your family was safely reunited, to many have not and it is a heavy burden and loss they bear.

Good luck with any future projects, and hopefully you'll have the where-with-all to share them with us.
post #1776 of 1780
Hey! John actually got the Auld Fella to come back! Nicely done. Too bad Hanes is a "drive by" poster in his own thread even.

Glad to see you still round these here parts Hanes!

Regards,

RTROSE
post #1777 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Hey RT!

I'm still working on the whole 'drive by' thing.





I think I may need more practice! tongue.gif
post #1778 of 1780
Oh! So close. Perhaps try drinking? Just find someone to hold your beer..

post #1779 of 1780
Gotta Love it when two old posters, drive by to mix it up!!
Great images !
post #1780 of 1780
Someone say "Old Posters"????...............................................................
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