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The UN-Theater Build - Page 3

post #61 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Going to throw out one of the big questions I have now in the hopes of getting some expert feedback, even though it will be a while before I am at the stage of working on this area.

The room immediately above my HT is the living room and sometimes - not often but sometimes - I can tell that there are vibrations or movement that comes through to the basement ceiling, and I'm worried about how it will affrect a PJ hung from the ceiling. I mostly notice this when my two teenage daughters are running around upstairs or dancing, as they often do - Irish dancing to be precise, with all the jumping and bouncing that entails.

I know one option is to build a room within a room type of system so the PJ is suspended from something that is isolated from the actual floor joists, but unless I misunderstand the process that seems like a lot of work in this case.

Can anyone weigh in with suggestions or ideas of how to deal with a "bouncy" ceiling?
post #62 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

I got mine at ecost.com they were running a special on them about a month maybe 2 ago and I decided to go for it. As for the 1909 models or any of this years models (numbers ending in 09) I feel that you can get more bang for your buck if you go with last years models (ending in an 8) unless you want the latest and greatest. I am sure you ahve but if not check out the sub $400 receiver forum here as they talk about ALL the deals on sub 400 and some over 400 models and their respective features or lack thereof

Thanks. I've visited that thread a couple of times and will again in the future. Of course at this point I haven't spent too much time looking into the PJ yet, espcially since I keep reading that Fatal Mistake #1 is putting up your PJ before you finish the build.

Not that that will really stop me from actually doing that, but it won't be until I at least get some progress in the bag!
post #63 of 1780
Thread Starter 
October 2008

So with the basement bath in the final stages of completion I was * finally * able to turn to the build process for the rest of the basement! Of course, the first thing that had to be done was to properly christen the project by sprinkling Holy Water on the walls and having a wee toast for luck, just like they used to do in the Auld Country, doanchaknow.

Next step was to spend the following day recovering from the hangover caused by that "wee" toast.

The third step was admitting that I had a problem, and no - I am not talking about the drinking thing. At least not right now.

I'm talking about the whole lack of adequate building skills thing, which led to the realization that I better hire and/or recruit in some help, and since unlike so many others here I don't happen to have a very handy father or father-in-law nearby to call on, I had to go with "Plan F" (having previously run all over Plans A through G): calling on a buddy who is a GC and happens to owe me a favor.

Fortunately for me, my buddy Chris was foolish enough - I mean nice enough - to throw me a life line and save me from myself. Personally, I think it just because he's just a great guy, although I'm not entirely discounting the very distinct possibility that he just couldn't come up with a good enough excuse on the spot to avoid having to say yes. Kind of like what happened to my wife when I asked her to marry me about 25 years ago.

Let's hope this build doesn't last that long, for my sake and my buddy Chris' sake!

Anyway, first we staged the framing lumber and polystyrene insulation boards in the garage, which as you can see in this photo also doubles as our storage area and cutting area mainly because the basement already suffers from having far too much crap in it to begin with. I'd love to have a nice, clean, empty work area like I see in so many build threads, but as I said ours is a basement in constant use so I'm making do with simply consolidating and making organized piles of crap, which we move from place to place to place, like deck chairs on the Titanic, and getting on with it.

Such is life. At least mine. Count your blessings.

post #64 of 1780
Thread Starter 
November 2008

This month I managed to remove the saw from the garage.

MAN that took longer than I thought!

post #65 of 1780
Thread Starter 
December 2008

Another month, another huge accomplishment: put the saw and compressor back into the garage. Plugged them both in. All by myself.

Took a well earned beer break.



(Logan has got to be eating his heart out by now.)
post #66 of 1780
Thread Starter 
October 2008, revisited

OK, the truth is I didn't really waste two entire months doing nothing but moving the saw and compressor in and out of the garage! As if!

No. I wasted two entire months reading threads on this forum and looking at the basement from all sorts of interesting, Builder Bob type angles. And I still couldn't make anything happen without me actually doing something.

This HT build stuff can be so confusing sometimes!

So after contemplating this dilemma deeply and fervently until Chris showed up with another load from HD, I realized there was nothing left for me to do but to start carrying stuff down to the basement, where I had to interupt my daughters' American Girl Doll tea party. I hated to do that, as it looked like one of those dolls was on the verge of teaching me how to plumb a level, or vice versa, or some such thing, which would have been much appreciated.

Once I got the insulation down there I began the slow process of measuring, cutting and putting up the insulation. By the time Chris got back from Big Orange with more lumber and we got the saw and nail gun set up, I had a reasonable start on things so we could start framing.



Then followed the cutting and installing of the poly boards.





I'd show you more but it would start resembling the above garage shots with & without the saw.
post #67 of 1780
Thread Starter 
BIG,

It took me a day or so to find the time to snap a photo of the finished sump pipe outlet you asked about. Here it is.



The discharge line runs down into the ground and from there, down the hill and diagonally away from the house for probably 10 yards.
post #68 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Thanks to my buddy Chris, who unlike me possessed both the right tools AND the know-how of what the hell to DO with them, we finished over half the basement in the course of about 10 hours spread out over Saturday and Sunday. Here are some photos.

Chris wielding the gun.



View of the long Wailing Wall, from the laundry room looking back towards the rec room.



Chris goofing off trying to figure out some minor framing detail while I was hard at work taking a photo of him. You just can't get decent help anymore

post #69 of 1780
Wow, what an ordeal. I can't even imagine having to deal all that mold issue and the sorts.

It seems like like you really had a good crew and they did a great job. The drainage system seems to have also turned our nicely.

That bathroom turned out great, looks very modern.

Glad that you have a friend in the biz to can give you a hand, but don't be afraid to get in the trenches and start to learn some of the skill that will stick with you for years to come. We all started somewhere and IMO you have the perfect opportunity with your buddy to learn how to do things right without having to deal with most of the mistakes that we all learn from .

Good luck on the rest of your project, your space is going to be great.
post #70 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Wow, what an ordeal. I can't even imagine having to deal all that mold issue and the sorts.

It seems like like you really had a good crew and they did a great job. The drainage system seems to have also turned our nicely.

That bathroom turned out great, looks very modern.

Glad that you have a friend in the biz to can give you a hand, but don't be afraid to get in the trenches and start to learn some of the skill that will stick with you for years to come. We all started somewhere and IMO you have the perfect opportunity with your buddy to learn how to do things right without having to deal with most of the mistakes that we all learn from .

Good luck on the rest of your project, your space is going to be great.

Thanks for your comments. I appreciate it.

I've actually been much more involved with the process than I've described so far, especially once we got past the mold & bathroom stuff. I just don't take pictures of myself - much easier and more fun to shoot other people (only in-season of course). Plus I'm such an easy target for my own sarcasm, since I'm always around and mostly screwing up anyway.

The deal with my buddy Chris was to teach me as we went along, with me doing as much as possible and him backing off as soon as possible and acting mainly as a consultant and hands-on expert as and when I get hopelessly stuck, which still happens more often than I'd like. That will slow the build down, but make i more fun and satisfying. Well, to me anyway. Not so much my wife!

But I'm really enjoying learning and accomplishing something that I couldn't do before, since like lots of folks my "day job" doesn't give such immediate, tangible results.
post #71 of 1780
Where did you buy your Sauna stuff? I have a space roughed in dedicated to be saunized.
post #72 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Thanks for your comments. I appreciate it.

I've actually been much more involved with the process than I've described so far, especially once we got past the mold & bathroom stuff. I just don't take pictures of myself - much easier and more fun to shoot other people (only in-season of course). Plus I'm such an easy target for my own sarcasm, since I'm always around and mostly screwing up anyway.

The deal with my buddy Chris was to teach me as we went along, with me doing as much as possible and him backing off as soon as possible and acting mainly as a consultant and hands-on expert as and when I get hopelessly stuck, which still happens more often than I'd like. That will slow the build down, but make i more fun and satisfying. Well, to me anyway. Not so much my wife!

But I'm really enjoying learning and accomplishing something that I couldn't do before, since like lots of folks my "day job" doesn't give such immediate, tangible results.


Hanes,
Totally relate to your comment that your job doesn't produce "tangible" results, unless of course you count the TPC report......

I used to frame houses to put myself through college. My fondest memories were coming to a recently blocked basement and taking the claw of my framing hammer and breaking the steel bands holding the pine lumber together. I would then take a deep breath and the smell of pine was almost over-whelming. It smelled good, clean, and real. I would then hump the lumber(in a plutonic manner of course) and begin nailing walls together. Quite often we would cap the first level on day one. As you wearily walked to your car to go home, a quick glance over your shoulder would provide all the meaning in life you would need. You were creating something. A home, where memories would be built and little lives developed. It felt good and right. There was a sense of contentment and meaning. Fast forward.....Today, at the end of my day, I look over my shoulder and ponder, what did I accomplish? What did I build? Whose life did I impact or make better? Why am I doing what I do? Sip, sip(of fine malt scotch) I digress......

Yes, dig in my friend and get dirty...... There nothing better than knowing you built something with your own two hands! Oh yeah, and have fun along the way!

Your wooly sasquatch/yeti cyber friend
post #73 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

Where did you buy your Sauna stuff? I have a space roughed in dedicated to be saunized.

I haven't bought any of the sauna stuff yet, other than the door, and I only bought that because my girls balked at the idea of using a toilet that looked directly to an open doorway. It didn't do any good pointing out to them that there was absolutely nothing beyond that open doorway but the empty corner of the basement. Princesses must have their privacy!! Personally, I think my wife put them up to it.

Anyway, I'm holding off on the rest of the sauna supplies until after I finish the basement and the HT. When I do get there, though, I will not be buying a kit, I'll buy the wood from a good local millwork place and buy the heater and a few accessories online at a place site like this.

http://www.homecraft.bc.ca/sauna_heaters.htm

Is there something in particular part of the sauna you are looking for?
post #74 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bwcafishing View Post

Hanes,
Totally relate to your comment that your job doesn't produce "tangible" results, unless of course you count the TPC report......

I used to frame houses to put myself through college. My fondest memories were coming to a recently blocked basement and taking the claw of my framing hammer and breaking the steel bands holding the pine lumber together. I would then take a deep breath and the smell of pine was almost over-whelming. It smelled good, clean, and real. I would then hump the lumber(in a plutonic manner of course) and begin nailing walls together. Quite often we would cap the first level on day one. As you wearily walked to your car to go home, a quick glance over your shoulder would provide all the meaning in life you would need. You were creating something. A home, where memories would be built and little lives developed. It felt good and right. There was a sense of contentment and meaning. Fast forward.....Today, at the end of my day, I look over my shoulder and ponder, what did I accomplish? What did I build? Whose life did I impact or make better? Why am I doing what I do? Sip, sip(of fine malt scotch) I digress......

Yes, dig in my friend and get dirty...... There nothing better than knowing you built something with your own two hands! Oh yeah, and have fun along the way!

Your wooly sasquatch/yeti cyber friend

Thanks, my wooly friend! And how 'bout pouring me a shot of that scotch?
post #75 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Meanwhile, progress was slow but steady in the bathroom on the main floor:

Tub area on the right, shower on the left



Shower rough in. Also shows a good view of how much of the wall dividing the shower and the next door bedroom had to be remove because of mold infestation. Gross.



And how much of the shower floor and framing had to be replaced for the same reason.

post #76 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Having held out as long as we could in this God-forsaken climate, I finally - in the second week of October - gave in to my daughter's pleadings and turned on the furnace for the first heat of the season.

Nothing happened.

Several subsequent and equally fruitless attempts led my slow brain to the inescapable conclusion: the @#*%* bloody furnace was dead!! And it couldn't have been a day older than 25 years years old, give or take a decade!

I knew it was past due for replacement, but it just kept right on working so why screw around with a good thing?

Now, in the midst of a major project, and the wonderful impact on cash flow that that entails, I suddenly realized that I must have had one hell of a great time in a previous life, 'cuz I sure as hell am paying for it in spades now!! But with the temperature outside starting to hover below the freezing point at night, now was not the time to feel sorry for myself. No siree, now was the time to drink myself into oblivion!

But since I couldn't afford alcohol anymore (or even oxygen at this point) I contemplated saving some money by not replacing the furnace and just burning piles of cash for heat instead, but when I saw how little those piles had become I held my nose and called in a couple furnace guys for bids, and before you could say "I'm toast!" I was scheduled to have a new furnace installed the next day on an emergency call out basis.

Left with no choice but to pretend this wasn't a big setback compared to what we had already been through and survived, I decided to take some photos of the process, perhaps so that at some distant future time when I came out of my coma I could finally come to grips with what had actually happened while I was living in denial.

Here was the old, great-great-grandfather furnace. If you are squeamish don't look, because the poor furnace was already dead in these pictures. Please remove your hats as a sign of respect.





Then the furnace was removed, and the new metal work installed prior to the new furnace going in.





Here's the old furnace carcass, littering up my driveway.



And a shot of the new chimney liner (required by code just so they could kick me while I was down) getting ready to be installed. Please, for God's sake, do NOT point out to me how badly my concrete driveway needs replacing or I will drop biological weapons on your house!!



And finally, below is where the photo of the newly installed, high efficiency furnace should be, but apparently I was too much in shock from loss of gravity in my wallet to take any more pictures. Or maybe I had to give the furnace guys my camera as partial payment. Either way, I somehow missed the money shot. I'll have to try and take one soon and add it as an edit, if I can move all the crap out of the way to see it.

I swear, if it wasn't for bad luck I'd have no luck at all!

EDIT: Finally snapped a photo of the new furnace, to satisfy the teeming hoards who were writing in to the editor complaining about leaving them in the lurch with no finish shot. ;>



Hey, I didn't say it was a beautiful furnace - just a new and efficient furnace. And a working one, which is what I like most about it.
post #77 of 1780
Man that driveway is in BAD shape. As soon as the one week of Spring hits Minnesota I would get that thing replaced.....LOL Couldnt resist. That furnace thing sucks. Did it set you back a ton of cash? The reason I ask is I am living on borrowed time here as well with ours that is in its 23rd year.....shhhhhh dont talk too loud I dont want to upset it as we have almost escaped another winter with no issues........I hate to think what its going to cost to replace when it finally says goodnight......
post #78 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

Man that driveway is in BAD shape. As soon as the one week of Spring hits I would get that thing replaced....

My homing device has locked onto your house in ... well so far I can tell it is in northern Indiana, and in a few moments I will have an exact address, and then I will push the launch button for the bio-bomb and you will never have to worry about your old furnace again.

Muwaha-ha-ha-ha-HA!!!
post #79 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Is there something in particular part of the sauna you are looking for?

I'm going to need everything so just wondering if you found any great sources. I've been thinking about one of the pre-cut kits from Finlandia but also thought about doing the walls and benches DIY if I can find suitable materials locally.
post #80 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC View Post

I'm going to need everything so just wondering if you found any great sources. I've been thinking about one of the pre-cut kits from Finlandia but also thought about doing the walls and benches DIY if I can find suitable materials locally.

My experience is that the kits are very convenient, especially since you can often give them your exact dimensions and most of them will pre-cut the boards for you, but you pay a premium for that convenience, and sometimes the quality of the wood is not quite what you can get yourself.

For some people the convenience is worth the extra cost, but for anyone who can build what you've built in your basement you would certainly find it very easy to do cut and install tongue & groove paneling, if that is your desire. All anyone really needs is a good plan to build from. Even the benches are very basic, really, although bench design is important especially for having easy access to clean the sauna.

But the real key is getting good quality softwood, with minimal knots or blemishes, especially for the benches or other areas where your skin comes in contact with the wood. Those knots will heat up much faster than regular soft wood and burn you if you're not careful. The sauna is no place to skimp on wood grade quality.

I would be more inclined to just buy everything other than the wood online. Certainly the heater and the door, but also some of the nice accessories - lights, floor boards, water bucket & something to spoon the water on the heater, and perhaps some low voltage lighting behind guards or under the benches. And this time around I think I'm going to add a couple of outdoor, weather resistance speakers down low (where the heat is less) so I can relax to some gentle music while bathing.

I'd be happy to be a resource in your planning if you'd like. It's one of the few things I know about, that most folks who didn't grow up with it don't seem to understand. But I think it's kind of like HT - once you try it the right way, then it all suddenly makes sense! And what could be better than combining the two?

Let me know if you want any further input as you draw up your plans, BIG. If I can be of any help with ideas to consider I'd be happy to do so.
post #81 of 1780
Thread Starter 
While we're on the subject of saunas and sauna vendors, here is the manufacturer of the sauna door I bought, partially because they had a local dealer so I could inspect the door before ordering. Also, check out the indirect, low voltage lighting, which as you can imagine is very easy to do. I'm going to go with some version of that, because having a single bright wall light is practical but not conducive to relaxing and unwinding, IMO.

http://www.finnleo.com/Products/Traditional_Sauna.htm
post #82 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Before all the rumor-mongers start spreading their disinformation, I want to quickly go on record here and make this one thing perfectly clear: That was NOT me that just got arrested for driving his motorized bar stool under the influence:



NEWARK, Ohio -- Authorities in Ohio say a man has been charged with drunken driving after crashing his motorized bar stool. Police in Newark, 30 miles east of Columbus, say when they responded to a report of a crash with injuries on March 4, they found a man who had wrecked a bar stool powered by a deconstructed lawn mower.

Twenty-eight-year Kile Wygle was hospitalized for minor injuries. Police say he was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated after he told an officer at the hospital that he had consumed 15 beers. Wygle told police his motorized bar stool can go up to 38 mph.

Wygle has pleaded not guilty and has requested a jury trial.



No, that was not me, as I don't even remember being 28 years old. But you gotta love this guy. In fact, I think I'm going to try to hire him as a build consultant for my HT. I'm guessing a set of stools like that might not be much more expensive than Berklines, and I bet they are much faster!
post #83 of 1780
Gotta love the wheelie wheel on the back.
post #84 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oman321 View Post

Gotta love the wheelie wheel on the back.

Rumor has it that is an extra safety feature for those who lean back too far while chugging their beer. I don't think it's included in the base price - you gotta pay extra for luxuries like that!
post #85 of 1780
Detour on saunas I have a roughed in space 6x7 and a 7 ft ceiling(based on my reading)

I was planning on something like this plan with the extra ft depth.



I was thinking the red cedar for the walls but what kind of wood is best for the benches?

And is this what you are thinking about for indirect lighting. This picture from the site you linked looks pretty good:

post #86 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Your space sounds like a perfect size for a home sauna. You don't want it too big unless you are going to regularly have more than a few people in there at once, which I rarely do. Mine is slightly smaller at about 5' x 7'. Seven foot ceiling height is just where you want it too. Any higher and your best heat is sitting wasted above your head.

That basic configuration looks great. Because of my room being one foot or so narrower I'm not going to use the L configuration, otherwise I would. I assume most designs incorporate the practical aspect of being able to remove, or at least move, the benches so you can periodically clean it thoroughly. Simple wood slides or hinges work great. Lots of ways to do that, but the key is that there IS a plan for that as part of the bench plan.

I'm not a huge fan of the design of the benches in the photo you show, as I prefer the more traditional bench look, but that is the type of indirect, low voltage lighting I was referring to. It's a very simple and inexpensive way to add a nice design element that is also practical for having a relaxing mood. This particular design also makes effective use of the wood 'valance' that hides the lighting, as it also serves as a backrest of sorts. Just have to make sure the width of the bench reflects the depth of that backrest or it might make sitting back a bit more unconfortable than you'd want it. As I said, there are also variations on this indirect lighting being hidden under benches and such as well. Here are a few quick examples just to give you an idea of possibilities.







Cedar is a popular choice for saunas, although personally I prefer lighter colored woods like White Pine or the much pricier (and hard to find) Nordic White Spruce. All woods tend to darken over time in the sauna envirnment, and for my taste some of the older Cedar saunas look terrific when new but after a few years they start to get a bit dark. The lighter woods obviously also darken, but often end up closer to the original Cedar color. But that's really more of a personal aesthetics issue - either choice functions well.

Definitely soft wood species of some sort, though, as they don't absorb the heat as readily and so stay cooler and so more comfortable. You can use the same wood for benches, and I usually do, only a higher grade to minimize knots and imperferctions, as those suckers can burn you! Purists insist on using Abachi wood for benches and backrests, but that is more expensive and harder to find and I'm not sure exactly how much difference it actually makes.

Hope something in that ramble is of some help to you. Gotta run!
post #87 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanesian View Post

Going to throw out one of the big questions I have now in the hopes of getting some expert feedback, even though it will be a while before I am at the stage of working on this area.

The room immediately above my HT is the living room and sometimes - not often but sometimes - I can tell that there are vibrations or movement that comes through to the basement ceiling, and I'm worried about how it will affrect a PJ hung from the ceiling. I mostly notice this when my two teenage daughters are running around upstairs or dancing, as they often do - Irish dancing to be precise, with all the jumping and bouncing that entails.

I know one option is to build a room within a room type of system so the PJ is suspended from something that is isolated from the actual floor joists, but unless I misunderstand the process that seems like a lot of work in this case.

Can anyone weigh in with suggestions or ideas of how to deal with a "bouncy" ceiling?

Didn't see any answers on your question so I thought I would jump in. I also have my projector ceiling mounted and frequently have a house full of yahoo's running and jumping above me. MOST of the time I don't see any jitter in the picture. There have been a few gymnastics meets and WWF exhibitions that have cause some jitters and in turn sent me up the stairs to light up a few backsides.
As to the hardware, I have the engineered I beam floor joist that are 11 5/8" tall and are only spanning about 20 feet so they are pretty solid. Other than adding some sort of floor to ceiling support pole at the point of the projector I'm not sure what you would do to fix that. The next time you have an Irish foot stop going on you might run down to your proposed mounting spot and put your hand on the ceiling just to see how much movement there is.
post #88 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HT1 View Post

Didn't see any answers on your question so I thought I would jump in. I also have my projector ceiling mounted and frequently have a house full of yahoo's running and jumping above me. MOST of the time I don't see any jitter in the picture. There have been a few gymnastics meets and WWF exhibitions that have cause some jitters and in turn sent me up the stairs to light up a few backsides.
As to the hardware, I have the engineered I beam floor joist that are 11 5/8" tall and are only spanning about 20 feet so they are pretty solid. Other than adding some sort of floor to ceiling support pole at the point of the projector I'm not sure what you would do to fix that. The next time you have an Irish foot stop going on you might run down to your proposed mounting spot and put your hand on the ceiling just to see how much movement there is.

I appreciate the feedback, as this is one of those issues lingering at the back of my mind, or the spot where my mind ought to be. I'm probably over-thinking and over-worrying about it, as it's not like they have dances on a nightly basis.
post #89 of 1780
Well, I might as well chime in too, even though a little late to the party. I've got a 6 yr old and 3yr old (who thinks he's Tigger) who run rampant on the main floor. When I'm in the hall and playroom area of the basement I cannot believe how noisy it is and wonder to myself "is that ceiling going to hold up". My GC assures me it will. However, in the HT, the aftershocks are much less noticeable (not sure if the clips+DD+GG have anything to do with that). Although, my husband has claimed to see the screen shake. But I wasn't present for that.
post #90 of 1780
Thread Starter 
Never too late for a party, Queen! Even for 5' 3" munchkins!

That makes me feel a bit better about it, although I think I'll have to come up with some way to test and measure the effect while my kids go nuts upstairs. Other than actually hanging a PJ (which I'm led to believe will stop all progress dead in it's tracks!) and seeing the impact on a screen, though, I haven't come up with a way top do that just yet.

Now, what can I get you to drink?
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