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Blu-ray audio and video quality vs. DVD audio and video quality  

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
In your opinion, with Blu-ray, is the improvement in video quality more noticeable than the improvement in audio quality? Or is the improvement in audio quality more noticeable than the improvement in video quality? Or are the improvements in both audio and video quality equally noticeable? Or are the improvements in both audio and video quality not noticeable?
post #2 of 31
I marked video quality over audio quality being more noticable but I have watched a few Blu-ray discs where the audio was as much of an improvement over the audio of the same title on DVD as there was with the video. For too many Blu-ray discs though ("Terminator 2" comes to mind), the audio was exactly the same as it was on DVD.
post #3 of 31
It's going to depend on your setup but if you don't notice the difference in audio, it's your rig, IMHO. So both are improved...vastly.
post #4 of 31
I can't vote on this... it's strictly on a per-disc basis. Though Blu-ray gives ample room for improvement in both picture and sound quality, some movies take advantage of one more than the other.
post #5 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rach View Post

It's going to depend on your setup but if you don't notice the difference in audio, it's your rig, IMHO. So both are improved...vastly.

+1

If you don't hear a difference, you need new speakers or receiver....or BOTH!
post #6 of 31
I noticed a difference in the audio, but the difference in video on a 96" 1080P projection screen overwhelms the difference in audio. I do not notice as much of a difference on the living room 32" 720P TV.

It depends on your setup. With a smaller TV you do not notice the detail as much, although I noticed the more vibrant colors.
If the source audio isn't that great to begin with, there is little to no difference in audio. I have noticed a difference in audio quality in only a few films.
post #7 of 31
There's nothing wrong with my audio setup. I've used two different preamps lately, and the audio gains are minimal compared to the video on a larger screen.
post #8 of 31
Its a hit or miss for both Audio and Video sometimes. Some will have a nice video upgrade but the audio could be a whole other beast. Cars was a good looking dvd and great on Blu-ray but the 5.1 PCM track really shines for me over the 6.1 Dolby Ex track. Overall there are improvements on both ends so i voted that way. Although sometimes i will lean more towards the video (Madagascar) and other more towards the audio (Serenity)
post #9 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karp View Post

I noticed a difference in the audio, but the difference in video on a 96" 1080P projection screen overwhelms the difference in audio.

I was wondering about the responses, and yours made me remember why I notice the video improvement more. 120" screen.
post #10 of 31
I voted for visual only, but that's probably because I don't have a good enough sound system to take advantage of the higher quality audio [IMG]http://www.entertainment-place.info/smile/img/2464/*************************[/IMG]
post #11 of 31
Humans have far more sensitive eyesight than hearing. No brainer here - though there is a very solid improvement in audio, one cannot argue against a fourfold increase in resolution. The difference between a good DVD DTS track and lossless on BD is at the margin.
post #12 of 31
Being that art is my career my eyes are a lot more fine tuned than my ears. For me personally the biggest improvement came from visual side of things.
post #13 of 31
My vote goes for both audio and video! [IMG]http://www.***********************/track/img/3358/m09d0317xktz/2.gif[/IMG] Thanks to my bro's set-up.
post #14 of 31
Definitley both for me.
post #15 of 31
Definitely both.

As may have been said before, if your sound system doesn't do better with either of the HD codecs, then you need to look at your sound setup.

As for the visual, look at the leads and ensure you're using the best options possible.

Seggers
post #16 of 31
I can't believe there are seven people who voted that video quality is not noticeably improved. ( ok - compared to audio for 6 of them )

Hmmm i think those people have only watched Escape from New York, Scary Movie and Traffic.
post #17 of 31
Some of you are reacting as though people who chose video are saying the audio improvement is not noticeable. The poll says which is MORE noticeable. For me, there is definitely a noticeable audio improvement, but the video improvement is more dramatic. On my projection screen.

If I were to answer the poll based on my 56" TV, then yeah, I'd pick audio.

So the "it's probably your setup' line of thought works both ways.
post #18 of 31
why are we still writing about this???. ofcourse bluray is better than DVD, but like someone said it depends alot on your setup.
post #19 of 31
Anyone that's having issues noticing the difference in audio, then I suggest they pop in Bourne Ultimatum.

Amazing soundtrack. I own the DVD and just rented the blu-ray. HUGE difference.
post #20 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ballen420 View Post

Anyone that's having issues noticing the difference in audio, then I suggest they pop in Bourne Ultimatum.

Amazing soundtrack. I own the DVD and just rented the blu-ray. HUGE difference.

I would love it if you could describe some of the improvements in sound you heard with the Blu-ray vs. DVD.
post #21 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kain View Post

I would love it if you could describe some of the improvements in sound you heard with the Blu-ray vs. DVD.

I would like to comment on this. The sound is fuller, more dymanic. The highs are higher and more detailed, more crisp. The bass and LFE are more intense and have more depth. Voices are clearer and more pronounced. And for me the biggest difference comparing to lossless is that with lossless I can crank the volume much higher without the glare of distortion or a sound that would strain ones ears. BD's like Chris Botti live or in Boston, John Mayer and more that are 96khz have that ability for me to crank it up as loud as I want without distortion or ear strain. These are some of the differences I notice.
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rach View Post

It's going to depend on your setup but if you don't notice the difference in audio, it's your rig, IMHO. So both are improved...vastly.

I agree with this, except the vastly bit.

I'd say both audio and video are small to big improvements depending on the disc in question. But then again, I'm not an American with a 1,263" screen.
post #23 of 31
Quote:


But then again, I'm not an American with a 1,263" screen.

You say that like excess is a strictly American trait.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert George View Post

You say that like excess is a strictly American trait.

I agree, we aren't the only ones, but we sure have perfected it and it seems to be where the economy is better, waste is bigger.
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by stigdu View Post

I agree with this, except the vastly bit.

I'd say both audio and video are small to big improvements depending on the disc in question. But then again, I'm not an American with a 1,263" screen.

Oooo they have those? I want one!
post #26 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert George View Post

You say that like excess is a strictly American trait.

I plead the 5th.
post #27 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hughmc View Post

I would like to comment on this. The sound is fuller, more dymanic. The highs are higher and more detailed, more crisp. The bass and LFE are more intense and have more depth. Voices are clearer and more pronounced. And for me the biggest difference comparing to lossless is that with lossless I can crank the volume much higher without the glare of distortion or a sound that would strain ones ears. .

Couldn't have said it much better.

I watched Doubt last night, and while it's not a movie that's meant to have a great soundtrack, listening to PSH giving a sermon in the church is amazing. It's like being inside the church.
post #28 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hughmc View Post

I would like to comment on this. The sound is fuller, more dymanic. The highs are higher and more detailed, more crisp. The bass and LFE are more intense and have more depth. Voices are clearer and more pronounced. And for me the biggest difference comparing to lossless is that with lossless I can crank the volume much higher without the glare of distortion or a sound that would strain ones ears. BD's like Chris Botti live or in Boston, John Mayer and more that are 96khz have that ability for me to crank it up as loud as I want without distortion or ear strain. These are some of the differences I notice.

+1 spot on.
post #29 of 31
To me the video is more noticeable. But I also have a pretty old and cheap 5.1 system.

And I'll preface that by saying I'm neither an audiophile or a videophile.
post #30 of 31
The problem is that there aren't that many BDs that include the same audio mix that was on the DVD.

Comparing the new mix to the old mix is not the same as comparing BD audio to DVD audio.

I will say that when comparing the same mix on the same disc, carefully trying to match playback levels (which is nearly impossible to do on an instantaneous basis), the high-bitrate core tracks rarely sound much different except in subtle ways that require careful listening to detect.

Comparing the BD to the DVD of new releases of new films, where the DVD has standard-bitrate audio, the difference is easier to detect (although again, this is not scientific and the results are entirely subjective.) But it's still not what I would call a "night and day" difference.

Whereas the difference in video quality between SD-DVD and BD is rarely less than dramatically obvious.

For purposes of this poll, I think video improvements are more noticeable, in the sense that you'd have to be visually impaired or watching from the next room not to see it. But the audio improvements are also worthwhile, although they can be masked by mediocre speakers, a poorly tuned room, or other factors.
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