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2009 Mitsubishi Owners Thread (C9/737/837) - Page 360

post #10771 of 11218
Can someone tell me the dimensions on the actual "Base" of the 82837? I am having tons of trouble finding it and need to know before the TV gets here smile.gif
post #10772 of 11218
The pedestal dimensions are 38.9" x 17.4". A link to the full dimension sheet is

http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/asset/file/dim_sheet/WD82837_dimsheet.pdf.
post #10773 of 11218
Hey guys,

I own a 4 year old Mitsubishi WD-65737 and love it. In the 4 year that I have owned it, I have only had to replace the bulb once and my only major issue with is was the DLP chip going out a few weeks ago (white spots started to appear across my screen). I took the TV to my local TV repair shop, got the chip replaced and got the TV back a few days ago. The white spots are gone, but now I have a new problem...

There appears to be some kind of white blobs/ ribbons all over the screen. They are really faint (they don't even show up in the pictures I took), and you can only really notice them when the screen is black/ blank or in a very dark scene in a movie. Do you guys have any ideas what these would be? I am going to call the repair shop later this weekend (busy all week) and talk to them about it, but I was hoping that I could get a better idea as to what the problem was... I am wondering if maybe they bumped/ dinged/ smudged an inside part while they were messing with the chip.

I searched all over the internet (and this forum) about this issue and can't really find anything about it. I don't know how else to describe the issue except faint, white, still, dynamic ribbons across the whole screen.

Thanks,
Ian
post #10774 of 11218
I guys, I know there had been a lot of heat in this thread.. I just bought an 82837 and thought (don't ask me why) that my new 82 could use the 73 inch Mits stand..

Until I can get the pinnacle stand in early next month, will this 82 fit inside the crevasse for the 73?
post #10775 of 11218
The pedestal dimensions are 38.9" x 17.4". A link to the full dimension sheet is

http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/asset/file/dim_sheet/WD82837_dimsheet.pdf.

The notch dimensions for the 73" stand is 37.7" x 12.8". A link to the full dimension sheet is

http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/asset/file/dim_sheet/dimsheet-MB-73737-73837.pdf.

In fact the pedestal for the 82837 is 1" deeper than the entire top of the 73 stand. The 150#
weight of the 82" is probably stable enough temporarily, unless you have small kids or a large
dog. The depth of the notch is 1", so you would want to cut a filler strip for support along the
back edge.
post #10776 of 11218
Ok, new issue, google didn't do much for me. I am running an htpc and on certain programs like "Punkin Chunkin" on the science channel and during some ads on todays CBS football game (miss/lsu) the TV will lose picture for a couple seconds and come back on telling me what the input is with the picture.

Should I upgrade my drivers? It only seems to happen during fast scene changes.

Could this also be because I might need a new bulb?
post #10777 of 11218
Ok.. It's not a problem with the TV, something is going on with the PC and I'll take it over to the proper forum
post #10778 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by imcclarr View Post

Hey guys,
I own a 4 year old Mitsubishi WD-65737 and love it. In the 4 year that I have owned it, I have only had to replace the bulb once and my only major issue with is was the DLP chip going out a few weeks ago (white spots started to appear across my screen). I took the TV to my local TV repair shop, got the chip replaced and got the TV back a few days ago. The white spots are gone, but now I have a new problem...
There appears to be some kind of white blobs/ ribbons all over the screen. They are really faint (they don't even show up in the pictures I took), and you can only really notice them when the screen is black/ blank or in a very dark scene in a movie. Do you guys have any ideas what these would be? I am going to call the repair shop later this weekend (busy all week) and talk to them about it, but I was hoping that I could get a better idea as to what the problem was... I am wondering if maybe they bumped/ dinged/ smudged an inside part while they were messing with the chip.
I searched all over the internet (and this forum) about this issue and can't really find anything about it. I don't know how else to describe the issue except faint, white, still, dynamic ribbons across the whole screen.
Thanks,
Ian

I have the same set maybe they smudged the lens, mirror, or back of the screen when working on it. I'd unplug the set and take off the round inspection covers on the sides and take a look inside and if need be clean with a micro cloth (you may have to get a little creative to reach some spots) might save another visit to the shop. BTW do you know how many hours are on the set?
post #10779 of 11218
If you just had the set serviced than don't touch it, call the service shop and have one of there techs come out. they should have a warranty for this kind of thing if they are a reputable shop .

if you must work on this yourself I would guess the problem is the lens assembly has gotten dirty. Don't try to clean it from the inspection ports on the side of the TV, the lens is too far in and you would be trying to clean it with some kind of cloth on a stick. the lens is extremely delicate and scratches EASY.

To access the lens for cleaning I recommend removing the front bezel and screen from the tv so you can directly access the lens assembly. clean the lens with 2 new microfiber cloths. Use a VERY slightly damp one to pick up as much dust as possible without wiping the lens as dust can scratch it. than use another dry one to polish the lens. i use small circular movements remembering to be as light as possible. make contact with the lens as little as possible. I do this with the TV on and a light gray field test pattern from avshd709 test disc displayed. This way I can hold the front bezel and screen up after cleaning and see if I missed something without having to put the whole thing back together first.

Don't touch the mirror its a Delicate first surface mirror and I doubt its the problem as the techs shouldn't have been near it during the DLP chip replacement.

front screen removal procedures.pdf 104k .pdf file .

http://i1242.photobucket.com/albums/gg528/SarRich1979/20120203_133521.jpg
Edited by cid67 - 11/26/12 at 6:43am
post #10780 of 11218
All right. So I've been reading in different places that while the 60737, etc. don't have a firmware upgrade to allow side-by-side 3D, the '38 does. And then you talk about successfully flashing a C9 into a '737 and vice-versa (but you should reflash your original '737 from being a fake C9 back into the '737 it was born as, if you haven't done so already).

So then of course that gives rise to this question: Do you think I could safely flash my '737 with '738 firmware? Then that would give my '37 the side-by-side 3D capability, wouldn't it?

What are the chances of bricking the TV? And it's out of warranty already, but if it weren't, the claim someone could make to keep them in good standing with Mitsubishi Electric might just be, "Well shoot, I must have picked the '38 firmware from the menu by mistake." Right? But anyway, if you did brick your TV, perhaps it would be just be a soft-bricking (maybe made of adobe), right, and an authorized repair shop should be able to bring it back, right?

I'm tempted to try this....
Mike
Edited by MaxxFordham - 11/26/12 at 7:20am
post #10781 of 11218
well the reason you can flash a C9 into a 737 is because they share most of the same parts where as the 738 does not. I would guess if you tried the software would prevent completion as a safety measure. don't try it unless your willing to accept the very real possibility that you could brick your set and no I don't believe a repair shop could restore it.

Consider this, if it could be done it would have likely already been done by another AVS member and talked about here in the forums.
post #10782 of 11218
Hmm, ok... Well, do you have a '737 or 'C9 like Georule does ('737)? If so, will you try this flash on yours and then return with a report of the results, please?

Oh, and also, if that doesn't work, like we suspect it wouldn't, then do you know where there's a place that still sells a 3DA-1 for around the original price?

Thanks, if so.

Dagnabbit, I keep reading these articles and comments about people being excited for when that adapter will start being shipped, merely 2 years ago, but by the time I can prioritize enough money for it, and with my luck, it's already discontinued merely 2 years ago! I can't stand that! Why can't companies keep things like this in production for a while longer (especially like... keeping tabs on the number of the TVs that need this that they've made, and then make at least or around that many of the adapters--considering that some people will have to replace broken ones after a while, even)?


Mike
Edited by MaxxFordham - 11/26/12 at 7:35am
post #10783 of 11218
Hi, folks, I have a 737 about 6 years old. It was working last night when my wife was watching it but, of course, this AM my kids went to turn it on and it made a clicking sound and had no video. We can get audio no problem though. The sound only occurs when turning on the system and sounds almost like a fan blade hitting something or like a relay popping on and off very rapidly. It will reoccur about a minute later and keep reoccurring several times. Then the whole unit will shut down entirely. I replaced the bulb in the unit about 4 years ago, could it be the bulb again? The last time the bulb died, it did it very slowly, getting dimmer and dimmer over a few weeks. The brightness on this one was fine last night while we watched the UCLA/Stanford game. I reset the unit from the front panel hoping it would fix the problem but no joy there. Any ideas? Maybe time for a new engine? Or a new TV entirely?

Update : oops, sorry this is in the wrong thread, actually it's a 62927! Dunno why I thought it was a 737, getting senior moments I guess. But if anyone has some ideas, I'd appreciate it anyways!
Edited by boomer400 - 12/1/12 at 11:25am
post #10784 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer400 View Post

Hi, folks, I have a 737 about 6 years old. It was working last night when my wife was watching it but, of course, this AM my kids went to turn it on and it made a clicking sound and had no video. We can get audio no problem though. The sound only occurs when turning on the system and sounds almost like a fan blade hitting something or like a relay popping on and off very rapidly. It will reoccur about a minute later and keep reoccurring several times. Then the whole unit will shut down entirely. I replaced the bulb in the unit about 4 years ago, could it be the bulb again? The last time the bulb died, it did it very slowly, getting dimmer and dimmer over a few weeks. The brightness on this one was fine last night while we watched the UCLA/Stanford game. I reset the unit from the front panel hoping it would fix the problem but no joy there. Any ideas? Maybe time for a new engine? Or a new TV entirely?
Update : oops, sorry this is in the wrong thread, actually it's a 62927! Dunno why I thought it was a 737, getting senior moments I guess. But if anyone has some ideas, I'd appreciate it anyways!

In the normal turnon of any DLP (or 3-LCD or LCOS) the processor on the main board asks the ballast to light the lamp. The ballast does that by generating a voltage of aroundf 5KV. When it does that you can hear a slight buzzing sound. The lamp is an arc lamp, and for it to light the voltage has to jump that gap that's around 1.0mm. If it lights then the ballast switches over to a run-voltage of 300-600V.

If the lamp fails to light, the processor is notified. It counts off a predetermined time, around 20 seconds, and then orders another attempt. Another one is made after that for a total of three. If the lamp isn't lit by then, the processor declares a Lamp Fail.

It sounds like this is the cycle you are seeing which points to a bad lamp. Not sure why you aren't seeing a clear Lamp Fail indication. Four years from a lamp is as good as you can expect. Get one from Mits or a genuine Philips.
post #10785 of 11218
Yup, bad lamp, exploded glass everywhere. Ordered a new one, I'll see when it gets here in a couple of days. BTW, the external maintenance grill cover for the lamp housing (on the outside of the unit) is actually partially melted, is that normal? I haven't really looked at it other than vacuuming the area occasionally and didn't notice it until I had to pull the lamp. Going to have to look at some kind of substitute as it's sagging in a serious way with a few pieces falling off.
post #10786 of 11218
Is anyone here familiar with ARC (Audio Return Channel)? It seems that my 82837 is not compatible with this tech but I was wondering if anyone else knew more about it or had some info for me? I have come across a Samsung sound bar with wireless subwoofer that I was wanting to use to replace an older Sony CT-100 set I had. However, this new sound bar only has one HDMI in and one HDMI out port as this ARC tech is supposed to allow my other devices to still output through the sound bar and not the internal Mits speakers (I have 5 devices whose audio I need routed through the sound bar). I expect it will not work but would replacing my HDMI cables with HDMI 1.4 cables work? Or does anyone know if the newest firmware (11.03 I believe?) would potentially solve this issue? I have not upgraded my firmware since I bought the TV in March 2010.
post #10787 of 11218
I have a WD60C9 just over 2yrs old.
It has a white fog in the lower portion of the screen that shows during really dark or black scenes.
Anybody know what that is?
Thanks.
post #10788 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyp22 View Post

Is anyone here familiar with ARC (Audio Return Channel)? It seems that my 82837 is not compatible with this tech but I was wondering if anyone else knew more about it or had some info for me? I have come across a Samsung sound bar with wireless subwoofer that I was wanting to use to replace an older Sony CT-100 set I had. However, this new sound bar only has one HDMI in and one HDMI out port as this ARC tech is supposed to allow my other devices to still output through the sound bar and not the internal Mits speakers (I have 5 devices whose audio I need routed through the sound bar). I expect it will not work but would replacing my HDMI cables with HDMI 1.4 cables work? Or does anyone know if the newest firmware (11.03 I believe?) would potentially solve this issue? I have not upgraded my firmware since I bought the TV in March 2010.
Manny, I will do my best to explain, as I just had to educate myslef on this whole ARC thing as I will outline below in my new den setup...

First, ARC is a way to get sound FROM a TV TO a soundbar... in order for it to work, you have to have two things going for you: 1) a TV that support ARC, and, 2) HDMI 1.4 cables.

Having said that, here is how it would work in the setup, not for my MITS DLP but a Sony LCD in my den:

I just purchased the Sony Soundbar and woofer setup, the HCT-150 (on sale now at Amazon for $188 bucks, good deal!)... the sub contains the amp and all of the HDMI and other interfaces. You plug your TV and Blu-Ray player into the amp on the sub,and then run a single cable up to the TV. The only time you would need ARC would be if you had a device plugged directly into the TV, you then need a way for that device's audio to flow back down to your soundbar/sub setup. If your TV does not support ARC then you simply connect an optical cable to the TV and then use that cable to get sound down to the soundbar/sub. So the only thing ARC would really be doing for you is to allow the audio to flow back down the new HDMI cable and alleviate the need for the optical cable.

So in this scenario ARC might be nice to have but not necessary and certainly not a deal-breaker. Of course this works better if you have one of the newer soundbar/sub setups that allow multiple HDMI conenctions to the amp and then you use that amp to switch your HDMI stuff. The Sony I describe above does this, and if you need the wireless sub then you have to upgrade to the HCT-550, which runs about another $100 bucks. The amp/switching center in this model is a separate component, apart from the sub cabinet, but it functions as described above.

In the Soundbar area of AVS there is a forum devoted to these Sony soundbars and it contains a ton of info if you would like to drill down more:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1236597/sony-ht-ct150-and-ct350
(... the 350 I think is discontinued..)


Hope this helps (at least a little!)
post #10789 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by MStem View Post

Manny, I will do my best to explain, as I just had to educate myslef on this whole ARC thing as I will outline below in my new den setup...
First, ARC is a way to get sound FROM a TV TO a soundbar... in order for it to work, you have to have two things going for you: 1) a TV that support ARC, and, 2) HDMI 1.4 cables.
Having said that, here is how it would work in the setup, not for my MITS DLP but a Sony LCD in my den:
I just purchased the Sony Soundbar and woofer setup, the HCT-150 (on sale now at Amazon for $188 bucks, good deal!)... the sub contains the amp and all of the HDMI and other interfaces. You plug your TV and Blu-Ray player into the amp on the sub,and then run a single cable up to the TV. The only time you would need ARC would be if you had a device plugged directly into the TV, you then need a way for that device's audio to flow back down to your soundbar/sub setup. If your TV does not support ARC then you simply connect an optical cable to the TV and then use that cable to get sound down to the soundbar/sub. So the only thing ARC would really be doing for you is to allow the audio to flow back down the new HDMI cable and alleviate the need for the optical cable.
So in this scenario ARC might be nice to have but not necessary and certainly not a deal-breaker. Of course this works better if you have one of the newer soundbar/sub setups that allow multiple HDMI conenctions to the amp and then you use that amp to switch your HDMI stuff. The Sony I describe above does this, and if you need the wireless sub then you have to upgrade to the HCT-550, which runs about another $100 bucks. The amp/switching center in this model is a separate component, apart from the sub cabinet, but it functions as described above.
In the Soundbar area of AVS there is a forum devoted to these Sony soundbars and it contains a ton of info if you would like to drill down more:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1236597/sony-ht-ct150-and-ct350
(... the 350 I think is discontinued..)
Hope this helps (at least a little!)

Thanks for the response; I'd been doing some research on this as well and seems like we've both got the same understanding. Unfortunately for me it doesn't appear that my TV is ARC compatible although I can't find confirmation of this (I'm assuming the lack of ARC being mentioned in my manual is pretty much negative confirmation tho lol). I don't believe all of my cables are HDMI 1.4 so I was hoping replacing those would work but I don't think that is the case. My current Sony system has multiple HDMI connections so all of my devices go directly through it now. That isn't the case with this new Samsung bar (which is odd to me as my Sony is several years older now) so I had tried to plug my cable box into the Samsung bar and then run an HDMI to my tv where I plugged the rest of my devices into (PS3, Apple TV, etc.). However, when I try to play my PS3 I get a message stating that only my internal speakers are available on this input (or something to that effect). The samsung bar does have an optical audio input but my TV does not. Looks like this sound bar is useless in my current set up frown.gif unless anyone else has other ideas? I don't suppose there's any way to make my TV ARC compatible?
post #10790 of 11218
1. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS HDMI 1.4 CABLES!!!! Per HDMI LLC rules there are only (as applies to consumer electronics):
A. Standard Speed
B. Standard Speed with Ethernet
C. High Speed
D. High Speed with Ethernet
C. Automotive.

Both Standard Speed and High Speed cables without Ethernet are compatible with ARC and these were introduced before the 1.4 and ARC specs for HDMI were finalized. The Ethernet was added at the time of the 1.4 specs but that feature has nothing to do with ARC.

2. A TV that supports ARC is required to list that feature in all spec sheets, owner's guides and required mark which HDMI inputs support ARC. This is also part of the rules set by HDMI LLC.

3. ARC specs were not added to HDMI specs until 2010 and the first TVs that supported that feature were introduced in late 2010 or early 2011 so your model of TV does not have that feature as it was introduced in 2009. As this feature requires special circuits, to which would not be in your TV that was built before the specs were finalized, there would be no way to upgrade the TV. It is not just software, it is hardware as well. These circuits are to:
a. Make sure the audio is digital and compatible with HDMI specs
b. Routed to the HDMI jack and ARC pin on the jack

4. The original intent of the ARC feature was to allow the TV to send the audio the TV received via an antenna using the tuner in the TV back to an AVR.

Most AVRs had all of the external source devices connected to the AVR, not to the TV, so the audio and video arrived at the AVR and only the video was passed to the TV. The issue was always getting the TV audio back to the AVR because the tuner and digital decoder for broadcast signals was in the TV.

It was always secondary that the TV could (IF THE MANUFACTURER WANTED) also pass the digital audio of digital connected external devices to the ARC pin - the TV is not required to do this. Also TVs are only required to accept PCM Stereo digital audio over HDMI, the other audios such as Dolby Digital or DTS are optional. At the time ARC specs were being worked on, the majority of TVs were limited to PCM Stereo via HDMI so ARC was not much of a benefit for HDMI devices connected to the TV. Now it may be different but at that time PCM Stereo was the norm.

AVRs and Sound Bars are somewhat different beasts.

AVRs have connections for a lot of AV Devices and get the audio for those devices directly, not from the TV. Here ARC is useful for the about 25% of the public that uses an antenna (or direct cable) for broadcast TV.

Sound Bars have very limited input connections and primarily let the TV do the selection of AV device source. Here ARC is useful but that usefulness is limited if the TV DOES NOT accept advanced audio formats via HDMI.
post #10791 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer400 View Post

Yup, bad lamp, exploded glass everywhere. Ordered a new one, I'll see when it gets here in a couple of days. BTW, the external maintenance grill cover for the lamp housing (on the outside of the unit) is actually partially melted, is that normal? I haven't really looked at it other than vacuuming the area occasionally and didn't notice it until I had to pull the lamp. Going to have to look at some kind of substitute as it's sagging in a serious way with a few pieces falling off.
Is the fan that cools the lamp working? I suspect it isn't if the plastic melted and the lamp exploded. check before you blow another 100 bucks wink.gif
pun.
post #10792 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by GEP View Post

1. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS HDMI 1.4 CABLES!!!! Per HDMI LLC rules there are only (as applies to consumer electronics):
A. Standard Speed
B. Standard Speed with Ethernet
C. High Speed
D. High Speed with Ethernet
C. Automotive.
Both Standard Speed and High Speed cables without Ethernet are compatible with ARC and these were introduced before the 1.4 and ARC specs for HDMI were finalized. The Ethernet was added at the time of the 1.4 specs but that feature has nothing to do with ARC.
2. A TV that supports ARC is required to list that feature in all spec sheets, owner's guides and required mark which HDMI inputs support ARC. This is also part of the rules set by HDMI LLC.
3. ARC specs were not added to HDMI specs until 2010 and the first TVs that supported that feature were introduced in late 2010 or early 2011 so your model of TV does not have that feature as it was introduced in 2009. As this feature requires special circuits, to which would not be in your TV that was built before the specs were finalized, there would be no way to upgrade the TV. It is not just software, it is hardware as well. These circuits are to:
a. Make sure the audio is digital and compatible with HDMI specs
b. Routed to the HDMI jack and ARC pin on the jack
4. The original intent of the ARC feature was to allow the TV to send the audio the TV received via an antenna using the tuner in the TV back to an AVR.
Most AVRs had all of the external source devices connected to the AVR, not to the TV, so the audio and video arrived at the AVR and only the video was passed to the TV. The issue was always getting the TV audio back to the AVR because the tuner and digital decoder for broadcast signals was in the TV.
It was always secondary that the TV could (IF THE MANUFACTURER WANTED) also pass the digital audio of digital connected external devices to the ARC pin - the TV is not required to do this. Also TVs are only required to accept PCM Stereo digital audio over HDMI, the other audios such as Dolby Digital or DTS are optional. At the time ARC specs were being worked on, the majority of TVs were limited to PCM Stereo via HDMI so ARC was not much of a benefit for HDMI devices connected to the TV. Now it may be different but at that time PCM Stereo was the norm.
AVRs and Sound Bars are somewhat different beasts.
AVRs have connections for a lot of AV Devices and get the audio for those devices directly, not from the TV. Here ARC is useful for the about 25% of the public that uses an antenna (or direct cable) for broadcast TV.
Sound Bars have very limited input connections and primarily let the TV do the selection of AV device source. Here ARC is useful but that usefulness is limited if the TV DOES NOT accept advanced audio formats via HDMI.

Very informational post; thanks! I assumed this was the case but wanted to get confirmation from someone else that it wasn't going to work for me. Looks like I'll need to just try and sell this Samsung soundbar. My Sony soundbar has a subwoofer that acts as an AVR as it has multiple HDMI inputs so I'll just stick with that for the time being.
post #10793 of 11218
I have a WD60-C9 manufactured in August 2009. A few weeks ago the lamp exploded/popped. I have the extended black tie warranty through Best Buy, so the replacement lamp was free. 11 days later the lamp explodes again. This time it was loud enough that it made my wife scream. Get on the horn again and find out that the ballast must be bad causing the lamp to pop. I get another lamp and ballast and have it installed for free again. It's been working fine for the last week, but I have another problem now. The specular hilights (especially on skin) are extremely dithered now and ruin the image quality. We didn't have this problem before. I updated the firmware to 11.03, but the problem still exists. Any ideas? I'm thinking I'm going to have to get on the horn again and have the technician come back. This is pretty frustrating, especially for a television that's not even 4 years old.
post #10794 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyp22 View Post

Is anyone here familiar with ARC (Audio Return Channel)? It seems that my 82837 is not compatible with this tech but I was wondering if anyone else knew more about it or had some info for me? I have come across a Samsung sound bar with wireless subwoofer that I was wanting to use to replace an older Sony CT-100 set I had. However, this new sound bar only has one HDMI in and one HDMI out port as this ARC tech is supposed to allow my other devices to still output through the sound bar and not the internal Mits speakers (I have 5 devices whose audio I need routed through the sound bar). I expect it will not work but would replacing my HDMI cables with HDMI 1.4 cables work? Or does anyone know if the newest firmware (11.03 I believe?) would potentially solve this issue? I have not upgraded my firmware since I bought the TV in March 2010.

Just a quick update; for some reason I didn't think about an HDMI switch before (DUH lol). Picked one up today and the sound bar is working like a charm!
post #10795 of 11218
Have a 73837 & still love it.
Can anyone tell me if I should bother with the 3D?
Is the final product worth the setup & hassle I read about all the time?
I have a PS3 slim for the 3D.
Thanks
post #10796 of 11218
If you can get thru the entire hassle, absolutely. Not a lot has been documented, so you'll have to do some picking and choosing of your own information.

When I have more time, I plan to do a wiki for people like you and I to help break into it.

IR is good, if you are dealing with an htpc, wait for my wiki, because at this point, I'm still dealing with ironing out the last details.
post #10797 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenguru View Post

Have a 73837 & still love it.
Can anyone tell me if I should bother with the 3D?
Is the final product worth the setup & hassle I read about all the time?
I have a PS3 slim for the 3D.
Thanks

I have the same set and bought the 3-D adaptor. I never got used to, or liked the 3-D because of the dimming of the picture and the hassle of the glasses. As a matter of fact, when i got a new AVR 5 months ago I removed the 3-D adaptor.

I wonder, however, (for anyone to answer) can I get a Blue ray DVD player that would allow me to see 3-D without the adaptor?
post #10798 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impala1ss View Post

I have the same set and bought the 3-D adaptor. I never got used to, or liked the 3-D because of the dimming of the picture and the hassle of the glasses. As a matter of fact, when i got a new AVR 5 months ago I removed the 3-D adaptor.
I wonder, however, (for anyone to answer) can I get a Blue ray DVD player that would allow me to see 3-D without the adaptor?

Yes, I have the Panasonic DMP-DBT-300 and I think the 210 Panasonic will output "checkerboard" 3D signal that will not require a 3D adapter. Any player that will output the "checkerboard" 3D format should work without the adapter.

Mike T
post #10799 of 11218
Quote:
Originally Posted by Impala1ss View Post

I have the same set and bought the 3-D adaptor. I never got used to, or liked the 3-D because of the dimming of the picture and the hassle of the glasses. As a matter of fact, when i got a new AVR 5 months ago I removed the 3-D adaptor.
I wonder, however, (for anyone to answer) can I get a Blue ray DVD player that would allow me to see 3-D without the adaptor?

Thanks for that,
Saved me a lot of time & money.
I was thinking about the 80" sharp 3D models. as a upgrade.
Like to keep the 73" for dual screen racing on 2 PS3's with 2 TV's.
A blast at my friends house with 2 73" mitsu and motorstorm.
post #10800 of 11218
Sad news about Mit's getting out of the RPTV business, my low hours 09 is still going strong ( I still get compliments on the PQ) besides an occasional dusting of the insides and the firmware update done long ago it has not given me any problems, I'm going to go ahead and get a spare bulb and some DLP link glasses for 3D and keep enjoying it for as long as it last because it seems that's all she wrote, RIP RPTV's


Edit 12-13-12 Sent away for a new Philips bulb I thought they were the factory bulb supplier for all Mit's DLP's guess not my original bulb is Osram.
Edited by Dave84 - 12/13/12 at 3:53pm
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