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2009 Mitsubishi Owners Thread (C9/737/837) - Page 162

post #4831 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

On my set bright is much more intense than brilliant, am I missing something.

Also what determines available modes on inputs? Brilliant is only available on my set when on cable, other hdmi inputs have different.

Are your settings for both the same? If so, then maybe Bright mode is the one with the lamp on bright and contrast at 100% and the other is contrast at 100% and lamp on normal.

One of them might have different color settings as well. I use Advanced and mine and natural mode look very close now after calibration. Brilliant and bride mode simply don't look very natural, but then again that is partially because I haven't calibrated "Perfect Color" setting to those modes.

I'm not sure what determines available modes though. I haven't used HDMI yet.
post #4832 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTyson View Post

Are your settings for both the same? If so, then maybe Bright mode is the one with the lamp on bright and contrast at 100% and the other is contrast at 100% and lamp on normal.

One of them might have different color settings as well. I use Advanced and mine and natural mode look very close now after calibration. Brilliant and bride mode simply don't look very natural, but then again that is partially because I haven't calibrated "Perfect Color" setting to those modes.

I'm not sure what determines available modes though. I haven't used HDMI yet.

Out of the box bright is the most intense, natural the colors are way off and dim, brilliant with the settings turned down is the most lifelike.

I haven't figured why I have different modes on different hdmi inputs. I really haven't had the chance to do much with the set other than tweak the picture it's very lifelike the way I have it set other than the red is sometimes over saturated.
post #4833 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by yagrax View Post

I'd agree there's not much difference between 1080i and 1080p on what the human eye can see, but there is some. My Dish puts out 1080i (agreed that it's not the best signal in the world) and my Sony Blu-Ray is 1080p. The difference is noticible at least to me. 1080i though looks damn better than whatever most of the < 1080i (Standard Def) stations are putting out.

BTW - all this on my WD-73C9.

you are comparing two different things, because blu ray will almost always look better than anything on satellite regardless of 1080i/p because blu ray allows much higher video bitrate. 720p blu ray would look better than your 1080i satellite.
post #4834 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by colour View Post

Out of the box bright is the most intense, natural the colors are way off and dim, brilliant with the settings turned down is the most lifelike.

I haven't figured why I have different modes on different hdmi inputs. I really haven't had the chance to do much with the set other than tweak the picture it's very lifelike the way I have it set other than the red is sometimes over saturated.

Ok, I played around with the settings. I believe the tv has a built in static iris like my Sharp DT-500 projector. I believe in "Natural and Advanced mode the iris is on for the highest on/off contrast and darkest blacks possible (but a less bright image) and in Brilliant/Bright mode it is off, because I noticed the lamp setting was set to normal regardless of the picture mode. I believe Brilliant mode has a higher gamma setting which creates a contrastier look, but at the expense of some dark detail.

BTW, if red is over saturated you can try going to perfect color and lowering the red a bit. I have mine on advanced mode and I'm currently comparing an static HD-DVD image with bright highlights, lots of midtones, and dark shadow detail. My Advanced setting has the best black detail and is easily the most natural looking, but quite a bit brighter than natural mode by itself
post #4835 of 11224
Just got my WD-73C9 couple days ago. Sold my old Sammy HLN617W.

PQ from OTA antenna HD programs are great.

However, hooking up my HTPC to is was disappointing. I tried all of the 4 PCs in my house. 2 are ATI cards and 2 are Nvidia cards. All of the cards were purchased within 2 years with latest driver. I tried DVI-HDMI and HDMI-HDMI connections, which makes no difference. The connection is named correctly as 'PC.' 120Hz feature was off. Video adjustment, including sharpness, were adjusted.

Hooking up ATI graphic cards produced underscan problem while Nvidia cards produced overscan problem. Neither ATI or Nvidia card rendered 1:1 pixel mapping, as the text are blurry like it's connected through analog at 1080p. My old Sammy had overscan problem, but the pixel mapping was accurate and the texts were sharp just like regular computer monitor.

I looked at the service menu and could not find the option for 1:1 pixel mapping or to turn off automatic scaling for HDMI ports.

Anybody hooking up PCs to their 2009 Mitsubishi DLPs with good result? Any recommendation on the graphic card?
post #4836 of 11224
So let me get one thing straight, before I ask a certain question. We are not, under any circumstance, allowed to talk about what we paid for our TV? Or ask what a good price for a particular set is? If not, what about private messages?
post #4837 of 11224
Hey everyone. I posted this reply to a calibration thread in another forum, but wanted to add my findings to the main Mitsubishi thread in the hope it may help. EDIT: Please note that I'm not a professional calibrator and don't have a meter, so this is a simplified approach that seems to work well for those using the DVE Essentials DVD/Spears & Munsil Blu Ray calibration discs.

I made a great deal of progress calibrating my new Mitsubishi WD-60C9. My findings are somewhat different from the usual advice. I could care less about what is "reference". My goal is to achieve the best quality overall. Here's the breakdown:

ADV (advanced) mode is crap (EDIT: I have since been corrected on this but lack the equipment to make use of it). The color temperature is fixed in LOW mode which results in tan-colored whites no matter how high the brightness, contrast, or lamp energy is set.

Bright mode can deliver better results but is still suboptimal. Gamma is off base and the reds are totally spiked to unnatural levels which cannot be corrected via Perfect Color without screwing up the rest of the color palette.

The solution is Natural - High color temperature. Yes, the default settings are a bit washed-out with exaggerated blues, but no matter. Here's how to get around it:

Contrast: 50. A bit on the lively side, so adjust according to your preference.

Brightness: 35. A tiny step above correct PLUGE low, but less fatiguing in dark scenes. Worth the tradeoff IMHO.

Color: 55. Yes... it's way too high for now, but this is the secret to getting around ADV's low color temperature limitation. The trick is to spike it here and then lower the individual color bars in Perfect Color.

Tint 27. On my TV this softens cyan but balances magenta. Looks good on my set, but you might be happier with the default 31. Use blue lens and NTSC color bars to verify.

Sharpness: 10.

Now the fun part - Go into Perfect Color and try the following:

Magenta: 22
Red: 19
Yellow: 31
Green: 31
Cyan: 31
Blue: 24

On my set, this creates a balanced red/green/blue profile in DVE's color calibration test. Flesh tones, pinks, reds, yellows, and greens all look pleasant to the eye in the restaurant scene.

As always, your mileage may vary. I'm convinced Natural + high color temperature + Perfect Color adjustment is the way to go. Unless someone can explain how to shift ADV color temperature out of the useless LOW setting?
post #4838 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Dangerous View Post

Hey everyone. I posted this reply to a calibration thread in another forum, but wanted to add my findings to the main Mitsubishi thread in the hope it may help.

I made a great deal of progress calibrating my new Mitsubishi WD-60C9. My findings are somewhat different from the usual advice. I could care less about what is "reference". My goal is to achieve the best quality overall. Here's the breakdown:

ADV (advanced) mode is crap. The color temperature is fixed in LOW mode which results in tan-colored whites no matter how high the brightness, contrast, or lamp energy is set.

Bright mode can deliver better results but is still suboptimal. Gamma is off base and the reds are totally spiked to unnatural levels which cannot be corrected via Perfect Color without screwing up the rest of the color palette.

The solution is Natural - High color temperature. Yes, the default settings are a bit washed-out with exaggerated blues, but no matter. Here's how to get around it:

Contrast: 50. A bit on the lively side, so adjust according to your preference.

Brightness: 35. A tiny step above correct PLUGE low, but less fatiguing in dark scenes. Worth the tradeoff IMHO.

Color: 55. Yes... it's way too high for now, but this is the secret to getting around ADV's low color temperature limitation. The trick is to spike it here and then lower the individual color bars in Perfect Color.

Tint 27. On my TV this softens cyan but balances magenta. Looks good on my set, but you might be happier with the default 31. Use blue lens and NTSC color bars to verify.

Sharpness: 10.

Now the fun part - Go into Perfect Color and try the following:

Magenta: 22
Red: 19
Yellow: 31
Green: 31
Cyan: 31
Blue: 24

On my set, this creates a balanced red/green/blue profile in DVE's color calibration test. Flesh tones, pinks, reds, yellows, and greens all look pleasant to the eye in the restaurant scene.

As always, your mileage may vary. I'm convinced Natural + high color temperature + Perfect Color adjustment is the way to go. Unless someone can explain how to shift ADV color temperature out of the useless LOW setting?

What meter and software did you use?
post #4839 of 11224
Not even sure what the proper search words would be for this question, so please help me and do not flame me

I will be buying the WD-73837 soon and wanted to be QUITE CERTAIN that unlike my WD-65734, the WD-73837 will work properly if I connect up my source devices (FIOS box, Blu Ray player, XBOX360, etc.) using HDMI to my Marantz receiver and then connect 1 HDMI from the Marantz to the TV. Will the Mits deal with the Marantz AVR doing the HDMI switching? The WD-65734 did NOT like this at all and I had to plug my HDMI sources directly to the TV itself.

Thanks again for an answer and any links that direct me to where this has been asked and answered before.

Claude H.
post #4840 of 11224
Hey Nick,
Please PM me with whatever other forum you are looking at. I too am interested in tweaking this set. I have another knob for you. In the service menu you can change
8. CCA
21. GRWH (gain Red White High)
28. GGWH (gain Green White High)
29. GBWH (gain Blue White High)
60. IDL
61 DBK

On my set the difference between color temperature low and high seems to be moving GBWH down 7 points(low)

I'm not sure if it is possible to get more things to show up in the service menu. I think most of the controls that used to be here have been moved to the ADV menu but i am unsure what the new names for them are in the ADV menu compared to the old names in the service menu.

here is a link to the best description i have found as to what these can do. I dont know what IDL and DBK are for

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...a#post15955932

Let me know what you can do with that.

I am going to start calibrating my set this weekend.
-Kip


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Dangerous View Post

Hey everyone. I posted this reply to a calibration thread in another forum, but wanted to add my findings to the main Mitsubishi thread in the hope it may help.

I made a great deal of progress calibrating my new Mitsubishi WD-60C9. My findings are somewhat different from the usual advice. I could care less about what is "reference". My goal is to achieve the best quality overall. Here's the breakdown:

ADV (advanced) mode is crap. The color temperature is fixed in LOW mode which results in tan-colored whites no matter how high the brightness, contrast, or lamp energy is set.

Bright mode can deliver better results but is still suboptimal. Gamma is off base and the reds are totally spiked to unnatural levels which cannot be corrected via Perfect Color without screwing up the rest of the color palette.

The solution is Natural - High color temperature. Yes, the default settings are a bit washed-out with exaggerated blues, but no matter. Here's how to get around it:

Contrast: 50. A bit on the lively side, so adjust according to your preference.

Brightness: 35. A tiny step above correct PLUGE low, but less fatiguing in dark scenes. Worth the tradeoff IMHO.

Color: 55. Yes... it's way too high for now, but this is the secret to getting around ADV's low color temperature limitation. The trick is to spike it here and then lower the individual color bars in Perfect Color.

Tint 27. On my TV this softens cyan but balances magenta. Looks good on my set, but you might be happier with the default 31. Use blue lens and NTSC color bars to verify.

Sharpness: 10.

Now the fun part - Go into Perfect Color and try the following:

Magenta: 22
Red: 19
Yellow: 31
Green: 31
Cyan: 31
Blue: 24

On my set, this creates a balanced red/green/blue profile in DVE's color calibration test. Flesh tones, pinks, reds, yellows, and greens all look pleasant to the eye in the restaurant scene.

As always, your mileage may vary. I'm convinced Natural + high color temperature + Perfect Color adjustment is the way to go. Unless someone can explain how to shift ADV color temperature out of the useless LOW setting?
post #4841 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaycoolJr View Post

So let me get one thing straight, before I ask a certain question. We are not, under any circumstance, allowed to talk about what we paid for our TV? Or ask what a good price for a particular set is? If not, what about private messages?

I don't know if there are actual AVS Forum rules on the matter (If someone knows of some posted somewhere, feel free to point at them), but my observation of the thread is that judicious dicussion of pricing and availability has been going on from the beginning in May (go back a few pages and look at posts around Black Friday for a recent example of that). I think the "rule" has been "don't be a spammer" --but I say that from an observation-based pov of the thread itself.
post #4842 of 11224
3) Additionally for those using the Brilliant settings...I had that turned on, but when watching Blu-Ray version of Harry Potter Half Blood Prince in 1080p from the Sony Blu-Ray player, the scene with Harry at Dumbledoors (sic) side on the ground right after when he fell off the tower and Harry came back to the tower with the crowd, there's some pixilating on Harry's face. Without the Brilliant setting and setting it to Normal or one of the lower settings, this affect goes away, but the movie is darker visually.
Just an FYI in case you have Brilliant set and see some pixilating.

I noticed this too on both Brilliant and Bright settings will watching Live Free or Die Hard off my cable box, but I wouldn't describe the effect as pixelating, but more of a reduction in the number of colors displayed, kind of like the difference between 16 and 32 bit color settings on a PC display.
post #4843 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by claude4 View Post

Not even sure what the proper search words would be for this question, so please help me and do not flame me

I will be buying the WD-73837 soon and wanted to be QUITE CERTAIN that unlike my WD-65734, the WD-73837 will work properly if I connect up my source devices (FIOS box, Blu Ray player, XBOX360, etc.) using HDMI to my Marantz receiver and then connect 1 HDMI from the Marantz to the TV. Will the Mits deal with the Marantz AVR doing the HDMI switching? The WD-65734 did NOT like this at all and I had to plug my HDMI sources directly to the TV itself.

Thanks again for an answer and any links that direct me to where this has been asked and answered before.

Claude H.


I know it's not the exact model you're talking about but I have a 65C9 and a Denon receiver. One HDMI between the receiver and TV, multiple sources into the receiver....works fine.
post #4844 of 11224
Hey all...so this BEAUTY of an HDTV just got delivered so I will let it sit and acquire my home's temperature for about 2 hours before connecting everything.

I will be sure to post some pics after I have done some calibrating as I was fortunate enough to run into a Mitsubishi Technician and he provided me some "expert" settings...so we'll see how well they work.


But wow! This towers in comparison to my 55" that is now in my den...I ALREADY LOVE IT and haven't even powered it on! LOL...


RJ
post #4845 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Dangerous View Post

Hey everyone. I posted this reply to a calibration thread in another forum, but wanted to add my findings to the main Mitsubishi thread in the hope it may help.

I made a great deal of progress calibrating my new Mitsubishi WD-60C9. My findings are somewhat different from the usual advice. I could care less about what is "reference". My goal is to achieve the best quality overall. Here's the breakdown:

ADV (advanced) mode is crap. The color temperature is fixed in LOW mode which results in tan-colored whites no matter how high the brightness, contrast, or lamp energy is set.

Bright mode can deliver better results but is still suboptimal. Gamma is off base and the reds are totally spiked to unnatural levels which cannot be corrected via Perfect Color without screwing up the rest of the color palette.

The solution is Natural - High color temperature. Yes, the default settings are a bit washed-out with exaggerated blues, but no matter. Here's how to get around it:

Contrast: 50. A bit on the lively side, so adjust according to your preference.

Brightness: 35. A tiny step above correct PLUGE low, but less fatiguing in dark scenes. Worth the tradeoff IMHO.

Color: 55. Yes... it's way too high for now, but this is the secret to getting around ADV's low color temperature limitation. The trick is to spike it here and then lower the individual color bars in Perfect Color.

Tint 27. On my TV this softens cyan but balances magenta. Looks good on my set, but you might be happier with the default 31. Use blue lens and NTSC color bars to verify.

Sharpness: 10.

Now the fun part - Go into Perfect Color and try the following:

Magenta: 22
Red: 19
Yellow: 31
Green: 31
Cyan: 31
Blue: 24

On my set, this creates a balanced red/green/blue profile in DVE's color calibration test. Flesh tones, pinks, reds, yellows, and greens all look pleasant to the eye in the restaurant scene.

As always, your mileage may vary. I'm convinced Natural + high color temperature + Perfect Color adjustment is the way to go. Unless someone can explain how to shift ADV color temperature out of the useless LOW setting?

Nick, what software and meter are you using for your adjustments?

Your logic is completely off in this. For you to get the best out of your TV you DO need to calibrate it to a certain specification. That's what it was created for and it works very well.

As far as ADV mode goes, you are completely wrong. It doesn't matter whether the color temp is at low or high, the end result is supposed to be 6500k after a proper calibration. With low, that usually means bringing up the blues and with high, that usually means turning them down. To adjust the gray scale, you need to adjust the rgb highs and lows in the ADV mode. Once this is done, it fixes any red push in the low color temp. In the end it should be neutral gray or 6500k.

Perfect color usually only affects the luminance of each primary or secondary. If you wish to fix the color coordinates, you need to use the ADV mode (or SM controls if you know what you're doing) and adjust rgb for each color.

You shouldn't need to adjust tint if you do the adjustments in ADV correctly (unless it is still far off after that, but in my experience it is not). The color control can be used to help with saturation, but it only helps a little. It isn't very affective at this unfortunately.

Gamma on these sets an be very good. It defaults to a gamma of 2.4. It should be closer to 2.2 and using contrast and brightness, this can be achieved very easily.

These TVs can have an amazing picture if you take the time to do it right.
post #4846 of 11224
http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/08/b...-be/2#comments


Home Entertainment, HD Players
Blu-ray's 3D spec isn't what it could be
By Ben Drawbaugh posted Jan 8th 2010 1:46AM
Feature
Blu-ray 3D logoWhile 3D is all the rage at CES this year, we learned today from the BDA that one of the biggest sources of 3D content isn't what it could be. The first thing that could, should, be better is the limited support for frame rates. Movies have been recorded at 24 frames per second for longer than our parents have been alive, and for about the same amount of time we've had to endure frame rate interpolation to make movies play back on our 30Hz TVs -- you know, like 3:2 pull-down. That changed recently with 120hz LCDs and 72Hz plasmas because those numbers share a common denominator with 24 (so the same frame is just shown three or four times). Well so much for that because the frame rates of the new 3D displays don't share a common denominator any more (either 30 or 60 hz per eye) -- admittedly this can change. But honestly the worst part is that some 3D cameras can capture 3D at higher frame rates and even if the director wanted to, the new 3D Blu-ray spec doesn't support it. The other issue we take with the new spec is that contrary to early reports, it is possible to create a 3D Blu-ray Disc that won't play on 2D only players. This next one isn't a big deal, but still disappointing is that even if the creator goes through the trouble to encode the movie in both formats, depending on the 3D player, you may have no choice but to watch it in 3D -- say if you lost your glasses or whatever. Now don't get us wrong we're pretty excited about the new 3D technology, but the way we see it is that anything worth doing, is worth doing right the first time.

*****************

so it seems everyone has to say good bye to 24p and hellow to 3:2 pulldown again. granted dlp rptv doesnt do native 24
post #4847 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robness Monster View Post

Thanks for the feedback, Bill. The only reason I was expecting specific product announcements is because when one of the company heads was interviewed just days ago, he mentioned that the company would reveal information about its 2010 line at the show. So far, it seems like nothing really substantial has been released. Just that they have a booth showcasing 3d, but with what sets and with what specs has still yet to be covered. I'll stay tuned and be sure to follow-up and let you all know if I come across anything...

On another note, it looks like 3d won't really be taking off for another year or so. From what I read, the movies, stations, and games are going to trickle out and they'll increase content little by little at each time. I believe players , movies, and stations are going to be releasing from the summer to fourth quarter so there's still a bit of time to work out your 3d home theater plans. So, if you're patient, I believe many can sit out the initial launch and perhaps wait a little while for better pricing when 3d really explodes.

Baseball's 2010 Allstar game will be in 3D so that's something to look forward too. Plus Sony's own MLB videogame will also be in 3D according to Sony. They'd have to release the game during spring training therefore the long awaited firmware update should be released during that time.
post #4848 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaycoolJr View Post

So let me get one thing straight, before I ask a certain question. We are not, under any circumstance, allowed to talk about what we paid for our TV? Or ask what a good price for a particular set is? If not, what about private messages?

With the exception of certain threads (blu ray discs and player deals, etc.), the rule at AVS is to discuss MSRP only. With so many posts per day and only so many moderators, it's very hard to police (which is why pricing posts have appereared in this thread since May as someone mentioned), but it's against the rules to discuss pricing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Dangerous View Post

I could care less about what is "reference". My goal is to achieve the best quality overall.

A reference picture (where the colors are accurate, black levels are correct, shadow detail is correct, etc.) will achieve the best overall quality.
post #4849 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by claude4 View Post

I will be buying the WD-73837 soon and wanted to be QUITE CERTAIN that unlike my WD-65734, the WD-73837 will work properly if I connect up my source devices (FIOS box, Blu Ray player, XBOX360, etc.) using HDMI to my Marantz receiver and then connect 1 HDMI from the Marantz to the TV. Will the Mits deal with the Marantz AVR doing the HDMI switching? The WD-65734 did NOT like this at all and I had to plug my HDMI sources directly to the TV itself.

As long as the Marantz is HDCP complaint, that shouldn't be a problem. If it's not, then the problem in the Marantz, not the TV

Why do you want to do this? By using only a single HDMI input for all sources, you will need to have a single picture setting that you will use for all sources. If the sources aren't identical, then settings that may be perfect for one source will be incorrect for a different source.

The primary reason for running HDMI to a receiver, when the TV has enough inputs to handle all sources, is for the advanced audio codecs that require HDMI. Given your components, only the Blu-ray player utilizes advanced codecs.

I currently have my Blu-ray player going through my receiver via HDMI and my DirecTV receiver and HD DVD player connected directly to TV via HDMI and to the receiver via digital audio connections. I realize that the HD DVD player can utilize advanced codecs. But I would prefer to have the picture calibrated to the source and sacrifice on audio than use the advanced audio and sacrifice on the video (besides, I can't remember the last time that I watched an HD DVD).
post #4850 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Broderick View Post

Why do you want to do this?

My receiver is non-HDMI, so I can't do it, but if I could, I would. The slow start up time on these Mits and the inability to properly program a third party remote to be tuned to the correct input is a drag. I'd go with a single HDMI to the TV just to eliminate that issue.
post #4851 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbug View Post

Baseball's 2010 Allstar game will be in 3D so that's something to look forward too. Plus Sony's own MLB videogame will also be in 3D according to Sony. They'd have to release the game during spring training therefore the long awaited firmware update should be released during that time.

The firmware doesn't have to be released before the game, as long as the game has 3D built in. Just like the Avatar game.
post #4852 of 11224
Whoops... sorry to get everyone excited. I guess I should explain my hesitancy in embracing "reference" as described earlier in this thread, as a number of people have explained how ADV in low color temp (with the reddish whites) should be acceptable as-is. I tried several of the canned settings and many of them were too far in the warm zone. But... truth be told... I'm not an expert here... and the differences probably have everything to do with manufacturing variances and personal preference.

That being said, I don't have a meter and am only using Spears and Munsil's BluRay calibration DVD and the classic DVE DVD w/tricolor lenses. Generally I bounce between making an exhaustive comparison between several live detailed scenes and the official suggestions. What I have come up with looks terrific and is balanced across all of the color bar tests. It isn't a perfect method by any means but it is an easy way to achieve a consistently good picture if you don't have a meter. Anyone want to loan me one?

bspoogeferd's experience with brilliant/bright mode mirrors my own. The red color range gets blown out to an unacceptable extreme and seems to reduce depth as well. Can't make it work at all.

Part of my frustration is that this thread is a zillion pages long and I can't find the nitty gritty about compensating for the color warmth. Kipperman, your link is exactly what I was looking for... and confirmation that I probably need more equipment to go there. D'oh!

(perhaps I shouldn't have stated "ADV is crap" since I couldn't figure out how to get it looking right)
post #4853 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by taz291819 View Post

Hey guys, one of Samsungs 3D BD players will output the checkerboard method, should work 100% with the Mits, no converter needed.

http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/06/s...-and-thinness/

I saw that yesterday.. Thanks for posting (I am slammed at work).

That said, my fingers are still crossed that checkerboard will be an option on the PS3 as well...
post #4854 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by d3adpool View Post

you are comparing two different things, because blu ray will almost always look better than anything on satellite regardless of 1080i/p because blu ray allows much higher video bitrate. 720p blu ray would look better than your 1080i satellite.

Then you agree too that 1080p is better than 1080i AND that the naked eye can see the difference? And we are comparing two different things since that's what a comparison is all about. The apples oranges arguement doesn't apply since in this case, the 'look to the naked eye regardless of the source of the video' is the root question.
post #4855 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicholc2 View Post

Perfect color usually only affects the luminance of each primary or secondary. If you wish to fix the color coordinates, you need to use the ADV mode (or SM controls if you know what you're doing) and adjust rgb for each color.

What SM controls are you referring to?!?! It has been my understanding and experience that there are no SM settings that affect color coordinates in the '09 models. I hope I am wrong, though!
post #4856 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by GizmoSprocket View Post

I saw that yesterday.. Thanks for posting (I am slammed at work).

That said, my fingers are still crossed that checkerboard will be an option on the PS3 as well...

The only reason for Sony not to support checkerboard mode would be political. Technically it is trivial since 3D games on the PS3 already support the mode so the hardware isn't holding them back. Sony will make a decision based on economics. Is the money they would lose by potential PS3 buyers choosing another blu-ray player (say the Samsung) from owners of 3D-ready sets more than the money they would gain from current PS3 owners who would be willing to ditch their current display for a new (potentially Sony) display that supports the top-bottom display mode? If yes, they'll support it. For Samsung it was an easy decision. They have displays that use checkerboard mode (and it doesn't cost anything more to support on their player), so why not support it and keep the good will of their current 3D-ready display owners?

With all this talk about Blu-ray, I'm surprised that no one has thought about the fact that it would be trivial for Netflix, PSN Store, Xbox Marketplace (now Zune), or Vudu to support 3D video RIGHT NOW. While there aren't many displays out there, the number is non-zero and will only get larger. You'd think one or more of those services would do it just for bragging rights. Since a software update can be delivered with the movie download, they won't have most of the setup problems that people will have trying to get their display/blu-ray player/disc software all in alignment to play their first 3D movie. They can even have a downloadable preview to assure the consumer they have their tv and their glasses are supported and hooked up properly before the consumer has to spend a penny on content. Now wouldn't that be reassuring to Joe Consumer?
post #4857 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by bspoogeferd View Post

3) Additionally for those using the Brilliant settings...I had that turned on, but when watching Blu-Ray version of Harry Potter Half Blood Prince in 1080p from the Sony Blu-Ray player, the scene with Harry at Dumbledoors (sic) side on the ground right after when he fell off the tower and Harry came back to the tower with the crowd, there's some pixilating on Harry's face. Without the Brilliant setting and setting it to Normal or one of the lower settings, this affect goes away, but the movie is darker visually.
Just an FYI in case you have Brilliant set and see some pixilating.

I noticed this too on both Brilliant and Bright settings will watching Live Free or Die Hard off my cable box, but I wouldn't describe the effect as pixelating, but more of a reduction in the number of colors displayed, kind of like the difference between 16 and 32 bit color settings on a PC display.

In my case it's definitely not a color reduction, Harry's face (cheek actually) definitely has scattered dots in a pattern on it there for about 5 seconds before the scene shifts to something else. (as mentioned before this goes away when switched to Bright or one of the other settings like natural or something lower)

My Dish sometimes goes color reduction when the signal degrades in a snowstorm or the converter can't keep up with rapidly complex scenes, they (both cable and satellite) compress the beejesus out of the signals and the boxes have to decompress them before sending to the TV.

On the other hand, the 1080p Blu-Ray gives the most consistant signal I would think.

At first I was annoyed that the blu-ray disc or my player was messed up, but I started repeating the scene with different settings on the WD-73C9. In all I haven't had much time to play with the TV's settings like others on the forum...so I'm a nubie on those tweaks.
post #4858 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by tallen94 View Post

The only reason for Sony not to support checkerboard mode would be political. Technically it is trivial since 3D games on the PS3 already support the mode so the hardware isn't holding them back. Sony will make a decision based on economics. Is the money they would lose by potential PS3 buyers choosing another blu-ray player (say the Samsung) from owners of 3D-ready sets more than the money they would gain from current PS3 owners who would be willing to ditch their current display for a new (potentially Sony) display that supports the top-bottom display mode? If yes, they'll support it. For Samsung it was an easy decision. They have displays that use checkerboard mode (and it doesn't cost anything more to support on their player), so why not support it and keep the good will of their current 3D-ready display owners?

With all this talk about Blu-ray, I'm surprised that no one has thought about the fact that it would be trivial for Netflix, PSN Store, Xbox Marketplace (now Zune), or Vudu to support 3D video RIGHT NOW. While there aren't many displays out there, the number is non-zero and will only get larger. You'd think one or more of those services would do it just for bragging rights. Since a software update can be delivered with the movie download, they won't have most of the setup problems that people will have trying to get their display/blu-ray player/disc software all in alignment to play their first 3D movie. They can even have a downloadable preview to assure the consumer they have their tv and their glasses are supported and hooked up properly before the consumer has to spend a penny on content. Now wouldn't that be reassuring to Joe Consumer?

Actually, I've been doing some reading on the BD 3D spec. "Frame Packing" is a mandatory method of output. And from what I've been told, but not confirmed by anyone in the industry, "Frame Packing" includes 5 methods of 3D output, with Checkerboard being one of them.

If this is true, the PS3 will HAVE to output the checkerboard method, as will all BD 3D players. I just wish someone in the industry would confirm or deny.
post #4859 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by studtrooper View Post

I tried that, it doesn't really change anything. The Natural/ADV modes have a yellow/tan-ish tint that you can't get rid of.

I know what you mean about that yellowish tint.the only way to get rid of that is to change color temp to high.i dont know what its gonna take for people to understand that these sets look awful out of the box.anyone who has sharpedge off dfield imager off low color temp and natural setting and thinks there picture looks good,sit your tv next to a sony or pioneer kuro with those settings and be prepared to send the mitsubishi back.i had my mitsubishi calibrated and i had to call him back to fix some other issues with color that just dont look right.what i did to get the picture pop factor:color temp high dfield imager on sharpedge on contrast 63. on the oppo bdp-83 turned the contrast up 4 notches then after the calibration and these settings it would kick any sony hdtv to shame.stunning picture.sorry about the wall of text.lol!
post #4860 of 11224
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stew4msu View Post

My receiver is non-HDMI, so I can't do it, but if I could, I would. The slow start up time on these Mits and the inability to properly program a third party remote to be tuned to the correct input is a drag. I'd go with a single HDMI to the TV just to eliminate that issue.

I always turn the TV on and off with DirecTV playing. So it's really not an issue for me. Even when I want to turn the TV on to watch a Blu-ray disc, I will have to go put a disc in the player and wait for it to load. So pressing the Blu-ray activity on my Harmony remote, after the TV has turned on isn't a problem.

That having been said, when the HDMI 1 and HDMI 2 (DirecTV and Blu-ray) inputs were calibrated (using a signal generator and my Oppo Blu-ray player, playing Digital Video Essentials, respectively), the correct settings on the Mitusibishi were identical to one another (which really speaks to the accuracy of the Oppo).

So, in my case I'm not really gaining anything from using separate inputs for the DirecTV box and Blu-ray player (other than not having to try to squeeze behind the TV stand and having to rewire everything). But at the time that I bought the TV and connected everything, I didn't know that the result of the calibration would indicate that the output of the Oppo would be as accurate as it is.
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