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The LED Edge-Lit Samsung 6000/7000/8000 Vs. the Samsung B750 Definite Comparison  

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
Samsung's latest LCD TV lineups are being regarded as the best LCD TVs ever. Both the new edge-lit 6000/7000/8000 series and the B750 haven't had much of a comparison, though critics have seemed to like the B750 better, and many people have been assuming that the LED edge-lit lineup is better because of marketing and higher pricing. Based on CNET's reviews, the CCFL backlit B750 has a better black level (wasn't an insanely high black level supposed to be one of the benefits of an LED backlight?) and a much more uniform picture, and outperformed the edge-lit series in most other tests, while being on par in the rest. Notably, the B750 includes all of the features that the 8000 series, which costs about $1k more, has that the 6000 and 7000 series don't, minus the LED backlight. The LED edge-lit TVs are much thinner, and that is really the only thing that it has over the B750.

Post your experiences and comparisons of both TVs. Both seem to be leading the LCD TV market in terms of picture quality, but which one really is the best? The edge-lit LED lineup was supposed to be a big leap over CCFL backlit TVs like the B750, but critics have a different opinion.

CNET's LED edge-lit UN46B6000 review:
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-t...-33488069.html

CNET's LN52B750 review:
http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-t...rColumnArea1.1

"This set outperforms the company's edge-lit LED-based LCD displays in most areas, including black-level performance and picture uniformity, and produced a better picture than any other LCD we've tested, aside from last year's LED-backlit models that utilize local dimming."

Personally, now I'm not sure which TV to get.
post #2 of 39
An excellent well thought out post. The choice is really a lot like last year, with the exception that the B650 and B750 have even better performance: especially the improved black level.
The 6000/7000/8000's phony black-level is confirmed to be a step backward in picture quality.

There has been some confusion over dynamic contrast which needs clarification:
The traditional dynamic contrast setting is available from the menu and manipulates/expands the incoming data. During calibration these features are always disabled because they degrade the image quality. Notice that computer monitors have no such gimmicks. (It is up to the studio or mastering engineer to ensure the picture quality.)
In summary since the owner has disable control, there are no issues, just like there were with Dnie and edge enhancement.

The new type of dynamic contrast (used only in the 6000/7000/8000) varies the edge type LED backlight based upon the incoming signal. It is non-defeatable. In fact Samsung will neither confirm nor deny its existence. Someone needs to file a freedom-of-information request?
If you want to be in HD-Hell buy the 6000/7000/8000 and enable the traditional dynamic contrast in the menu. These two forms of heavy-handed gross picture manipulation combined must a sight to behold!

Cnet findings make a mockery and teach the harmful effects of advertising. Pay $1000 more for reduced performance. (Am I an idiot? )
post #3 of 39
I think there is a place for LED edge-lit displays in the market but its not at the high-end. The biggest wins with LED backlights come from zone-dimming and color purity/saturation. With edge-lighting, you trade off meaningful zone-dimming for panel thinness. Not a trade-off I want to make.
Over time, I expect edge-lit LED to take over the low-end of the LCD display business with RGB-cluster backlighting taking over the mid-range.
So if you want tomorrow's entry-level TV at today's mid-range prices, go for it. They do look very good. And you'll be the first kid on the block. Bragging rights cost, though.
post #4 of 39
"I think there is a place for LED edge-lit displays in the market but its not at the high-end."
This issue has is the number-one point of contention at AVS forum this year as Samsung and its dealers have marketed edge lit LED as the superior solution, worthy of a large price premium. Just look at the Sunday ads to confirm the deception.

Samsung calls its true local dimming (the real PQ advance but more costly to manufacture in the 950 and coming 9000 series) SmartLighting. They left the obvious name off their edge lit displays: DumbLighting.

Toshiba calls there dumb lighting DynaLight:
DynaLight™ Dynamic Back Light Control
Benefit: DynaLight™ monitors the brightness level of each video frame, and automatically adjusts the backlight intensity based on the image content.

Their new smart type is called FocaLight
FocaLight LED Backlight with Local Dimming
"Toshibas SV Series REGZA models also feature FocaLight LED Backlight with Local Dimming. Unlike simple edge LED, FocaLight offers a full LED matrix for better brightness uniformity. Even more important is that the Local Dimming system allows the LEDs to be controlled by zone, creating a significantly higher dynamic contrast ratio, where blacks are blacker without reducing the peak white brightness. The result is a new level of picture quality and depth that was not possible with standard (read dumb) backlight systems."

http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/news/new...asp?newsid=209

True local dimming also offers new backlight scanning technology which allows for clearer motion.

Significantly, the new Toshiba 55" true local dimming is priced way less than the inferior Samsung 6000/7000/8000 series. I look forward to viewing them at the warehouse clubs.

Note: Samsung game this year is manipulate the MSRP frequently rather than offering the perception of a steep discount. Remember the only relevant fact is the price you pay.
post #5 of 39
Samsung's LED marketing is definitely confusing a lot of people, including salespersons.
Your "smart" vs. "dumb" comparison needs some clarification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFiFun View Post

Toshiba calls there dumb lighting DynaLight:
DynaLight™ Dynamic Back Light Control
Benefit: DynaLight™ monitors the brightness level of each video frame, and automatically adjusts the backlight intensity based on the image content.

Dynalight can be turned off, so the user has a choice of having "dumb" or not.
Although there isn't any noticeable difference when it is on vs. off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFiFun View Post

Their new smart type is called FocaLight
FocaLight LED Backlight with Local Dimming.

Here you are comparing two different things.
If FocaLight (Backlit LED) is the smart type, then fluorescent would have been the dumb type.
DynaLight is not Toshiba's name for the backlight, Focalight is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFiFun View Post

True local dimming also offers new backlight scanning technology which allows for clearer motion.

Both the "smart" and "dumb" Toshiba backlights use backlight scanning technology to simulate 240Hz.
post #6 of 39
Thread Starter 
I haven't seen a B750 in person, but admittedly, the edge-lit LED TVs are the best TVs in the showrooms at the moment, at least at whatever settings they keep their TVs on. That is believable that it really is that good from reviews, but I'm not sure the B750 really is better because the B650 next to the 6000 series looked a lot worse. It might be, BestBuy didn't have the B750 on display last time that I was there.
post #7 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeper View Post

Samsung's LED marketing is definitely confusing a lot of people, including salespersons.

Here you are comparing two different things.
If FocaLight (Backlit LED) is the smart type, then fluorescent would have been the dumb type.

No, the context here is the two types of LED powered backlighting: edge and local dimming.
Whatever marketing term Toshiba has developed is irrelevant since it can be switched off. Samsung (in their arrogance,) provided no such capability even though the cost is zero (adding a menu item).
Only solid-state LED lighting can be switched on/off dynamically to change intensity between frames. The all-important limitation is that edge lit LED's are all switched on/off together. The is only one zone - the entire screen.
(Over in the the front projector dynamic iris pumping was exposed years ago. High-end projectors omit it. Except if you lag in technology, namely Sony. Now, even Home Theater comments that dynamic iris projectors lack punch in mixed-content scenes.)

True local dimming divides the screen up into scores or hundreds of zones which are largely independent of each other. One area of the screen can be 100% white while the other can simultaneously be true 0% black.
Edge lit LED displays, under the same circumstances may only be 70% white with its real native black level exposed. This deliberate picture distortion, would result in a picture that lacks real-world punch (like plasma?). Further 2,000,000:1 contrast ratios for edge-lit displays are misleading at best.

Traditional fluorescent intensity stays constant between frames and is outside the scope of this discussion. Except (both embarrassingly and humorously,) Cnet tested and rated the black level of B750 fluorescent display higher than the gimmick black level of the 6000/7000/8000. If Toshiba added some new gimmick feature (DynaLight), then shame on them.
My recommendation is either the B650 (if size is important), B750 or the new 9000 if you have the budget.
Who wants to bet that Consumer Reports will rate the improved B650 as best?
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFiFun View Post

Traditional fluorescent intensity stays constant between frames and is outside the scope of this discussion.

If fluorescent is outside the scope of this discussion, why is the thread title and OP a comparison between fluorescent and edge-lit models?
And why did you mention DynaLight, which is a particular type of a control for a fluorescent backlight.

You completely misunderstood that my main point was that your dumb to smart comparison was ill conceived.

So called dumb DynaLight = Trade name for a particular type of fluorescent backlight control.

So called smart FocalLight = Trade name for an LED backlight.

You were comparing a control feature to a backlight. Two different animals.
post #9 of 39
<<Cnet findings make a mockery and teach the harmful effects of advertising. Pay $1000 more for reduced performance. (Am I an idiot? )[/quote]

This is my first post on AVS, so I hope the partial quote I've chosen comes through as intended. I think the "harmful effects of advertising" can't be underestimated. Companies are often driven to create unnecessary "needs," and I wonder if "thinner" has become one of them. I also wonder how many people understand the compromises required in picture quality in order to get thinner and thinner sets---the advantage to which lies mainly in wall mounting (and best with internal cabling and wiring).

Yes indeed, what aficianado in his or her right mind would sacrifice quality for thinness? It's really the "look" that's being marketed. Sales people should help customers understand that this "look" involves compromise.

At least the shiny screen issue was a legitimate controversy, but sacrificing quality for thin screens seems to me beyond debate unless one has a specific requirement for a super-thin display.
post #10 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MICHAELSD View Post

I haven't seen a B750 in person, but admittedly, the edge-lit LED TVs are the best TVs in the showrooms at the moment, at least at whatever settings they keep their TVs on. That is believable that it really is that good from reviews, but I'm not sure the B750 really is better because the B650 next to the 6000 series looked a lot worse. It might be, BestBuy didn't have the B750 on display last time that I was there.

There is no comparison between a B650 and B750, the B750 is a huge leap in better PQ over the B650. Last Monday I was in an UE store and saw the B650, B750, and B7000 as well as many others. The B750, if you can deal with the highly reflective screen, had the best PQ of any HDTV they had under $5K. The B750 is the best HDTV Samsung currently has available as it doesn't have the viewing angle problems of the A950, but still has a "knock your socks off" picture. The B7000 was a bit better than the B650, but not even in the same quality class as the B750.

If you think "thin" will impress your friends more than top PQ, buy one of the over-priced Samsung Luxia series TVs. But, I hardily endorse the CNET reviews in this case.
post #11 of 39
seriously, people need to get over that "B750 is a huge leap over the B650"

It's the same freakin' tv with a slighter faster response and 240hz which doesn't improve ****. I'm not saying this to diss the B750, I almost bougth one myself if it wasn't so much more expensive than the B650 in my country, but the B650 will give you the same PQ.
post #12 of 39
this is not true, because the 750 uses a completely different panel type.
the 750 uses for example a 10bit panel, the 650 a 8bit panel.
not to mention native contrast.

so yes, it can be that the 750 has a better pq than the 650.
BUT
imho the 650 and the 6000/7000 share the same panels (except backlight)... so if this is true then the 750 and the 8000 will most likely also share the same panel.

the interesting comparisons would then be:
750 to 8000
650 to 6000/7000
this also shows how much you really have to pay for the extra thin tv ;-)
post #13 of 39
These panel-type's fly arround here all the time and IMO, don't always have credible sources. Most of the time it's " I've heard from ..."

Native contrast the same, it is not stated when you compare the spec's. Samsung site will say they both have ultra-contrast. Now it can be that there are some differences between these 2 ( contrast and 2 bit panel-difference) But if it were to give a significant difference in PQ samsung would have promoted it that way. I also believe that once you reach a certain contrast, in a certain panel-size, increasing it doesn't do ****. It's a bit like the Megapixel race in camera's. Purely for bragging, but PQ-wise, nothing extra. Also; on paper, the B6000 and B7000 series have much higher "ultra-contrast" ( 3.000.000:1 I believe ) but many people find the B750/B650 to be on par with them, which kinda shows how once a certain level is achieved, all benefits of increasing it are very small to nothing.

Instead they did not quote the difference and launched the B750 as the B650 with 240hz. That's it's "selling point". I conclude that they do have almost identical PQ since not one review has stated 240 as a good step up from 120hz, same happend with the Z4500 sony's.
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeper View Post

If fluorescent is outside the scope of this discussion, why is the thread title and OP a comparison between fluorescent and edge-lit models?
And why did you mention DynaLight, which is a particular type of a control for a fluorescent backlight.

You completely misunderstood that my main point was that your dumb to smart comparison was ill conceived.

You said about DynaLight:
"Although there isn't any noticeable difference when it is on vs. off."

We agree on this point: Technically speaking fluorescent lighting cannot be switched on and off fast enough to vary the lighting between frames. Therefore Dynalight in theory and practice is simply a made-up marketing term to have something new to advertise in response to Samsung's LED's. While this harmless placebo is a red-herring, it serves a purpose in making it difficult for the consumer to objectively decide which display to purchase. (The real purpose). It may be dumb and misleading propaganda, but it does no harm to the picture quality.
Samsung's DumbLighting LED is all to real and is being sold and priced as a high-end feature, when in fact the displays cost less to manufacture and offers inferior picture quality performance. This is leadership gone astray.

Samsung has made true advances in the improving the black level, contrast and motion clarity of the B650 and B750 series. There are a safe purchase with no gimmicks or downsides. I agree with Cnet and whole-heartly recommended them.
For the record I also compared the new Samsung 58" 860 plasma to the beloved Kuro. The 860 was brighter, naturally sharper and with better motion resolution. Both had comparable black levels. The Kuro had more accurate reds. With a MSRP of $3200 the 860 deserves serious consideration.
post #15 of 39
Two quick points.

The CE dimming feature IS defeatable, you just have to access the service menu to do it. It is not possible to disable it in any of the standard menu settings. Average Joe will not notice it and the afficianado will find out how to disable it so where is the real harm in it?

One selling point that is a genuine benefit that seems to be glossed over in these discussions is a much lower power usage to operate these edge lit LEDs and their "green" manufacturing. For people who care about such things this is a strong selling point and one that may trump all but the most glaring differences in picture quality.
post #16 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rikfrombelgium View Post

These panel-type's fly arround here all the time and IMO, don't always have credible sources. Most of the time it's " I've heard from ..."

Native contrast the same, it is not stated when you compare the spec's.

in fact the source i referred to was the service manual floating around somewhere in various forums (for the 650 and 750).
if you take the panel names from there and google you find the native specs.

the native contrast was never used on any spec page (its not the 100000:1 or whatever dynamic contrast they reach, but the native contrast of the panel isself without sw enhancements).

if you see the sony z5500, they do market the 10bit panel in the specs (and this is propably the same panel samsung uses...).

interesting enough, the native contrast of the s-pva b650's is (from the service manual numbers) a bit higher than the native contrast of the auo b750's. but i wonder if the 8-to-10-bit maybe makes a pq difference here.

also i just wanted to counter the post that the tvs are the same. they are definitely not the same because they use completely different panel "technology" aka panel types.
post #17 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiFiFun View Post

Cut.... Technically speaking fluorescent lighting cannot be switched on and off fast enough to vary the lighting between frames. Therefore Dynalight in theory and practice is simply a made-up marketing term to have something new to advertise in response to Samsung's LED's.

Apparently there is some confusion regarding the intended use of Toshiba picture controls.

I don't know what your source is for the above statement, but Toshiba thinks they can switch a fluorescent backlight on and off for each frame with ClearScan 240Hz.

Using your logic, that would seemingly make ClearScan 240Hz another "dumb" control, even though the user can choose to use it or not to improve the picture.

The previously discussed DynaLight's function isn't intended to switch the backlight on and off between frames as you suggested above.

Scanning florescent backlight explanation:
LL
post #18 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MICHAELSD View Post

I haven't seen a B750 in person, but admittedly, the edge-lit LED TVs are the best TVs in the showrooms at the moment, at least at whatever settings they keep their TVs on. That is believable that it really is that good from reviews, but I'm not sure the B750 really is better because the B650 next to the 6000 series looked a lot worse. It might be, BestBuy didn't have the B750 on display last time that I was there.

your impression is not far from the truth and same as mine. I have the B6000 and have seen the B750 many, many time with diff scree sizes and it's not much better than B650, only main diff is that it does not have the really ulgy design of the V shape. The B6000 is better and noticeably has deeper blacks.

But there are some intangible diff that is priceless. And that is when a family member or in-law you hate visits sees the B6000 and how razor thin it is and green smoke of envy is coming out his ears, you realize this puppy has more than made up for the price.
post #19 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoey67 View Post

But there are some intangible diff that is priceless. And that is when a family member or in-law you hate visits sees the B6000 and how razor thin it is and green smoke of envy is coming out his ears, you realize this puppy has more than made up for the price.

I thought is was "cardboard" thin? Now it's down to "razor"? It's getting thinner by the day. Pretty soon it will be too flimsy to support it's weight.

What happens when your hated family member's kids visit and bend it? Then who will output green smoke?
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjtorres View Post

I think there is a place for LED edge-lit displays in the market but its not at the high-end. The biggest wins with LED backlights come from zone-dimming and color purity/saturation. With edge-lighting, you trade off meaningful zone-dimming for panel thinness. Not a trade-off I want to make.
Over time, I expect edge-lit LED to take over the low-end of the LCD display business with RGB-cluster backlighting taking over the mid-range.
So if you want tomorrow's entry-level TV at today's mid-range prices, go for it. They do look very good. And you'll be the first kid on the block. Bragging rights cost, though.

To make that kind of statement, you have either never seen Luxia in person - or have some kind of personal bias. The picture quality on these sets is simply stunning. I'm not going to argue the case edge LED vs CCFL or vs local dimming. But to say they are not high end, you're way off
post #21 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by zoey67 View Post

your impression is not far from the truth and same as mine. I have the B6000 and have seen the B750 many, many time with diff scree sizes and it's not much better than B650, only main diff is that it does not have the really ulgy design of the V shape. The B6000 is better and noticeably has deeper blacks.

But there are some intangible diff that is priceless. And that is when a family member or in-law you hate visits sees the B6000 and how razor thin it is and green smoke of envy is coming out his ears, you realize this puppy has more than made up for the price.

As long as you can deal with the flashlights/cloudings on a Luxia (either your set doesn't have it or you watch it in bright ambiance or you don't care), then I'd say the Luxia is very cool.

For me, I had the Luxia and a B650 in the same room for sometime, and I return the Luxia. After calibrating both TV with DVE in the same room, I failed to see why people would claim that the Luxia has much better picture (or that of the B650 is a lot worse???). To me, the PQ is almost identical, except maybe the Luxia have slightly darker black, but less shadow detail.

I think the decision to buy a Luxia or B650/B750 depends on:
- how important is the coolness factor is to you?
- does flashlight/cloudings bother you?
- money (which wasn't an issue to me)

I was sad to return the Luxia, as it did have a very good "wow" factor. But I'm very happy with the B650 now. After owning the Luxia for a while, the unfortunate thing is, at times, my eye is still drawn to the corners of the B650 to look for flashlights (as on the Luxia). Good thing I don't see it anymore
post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by rikfrombelgium View Post

These panel-type's fly arround here all the time and IMO, don't always have credible sources. Most of the time it's " I've heard from ..."

Native contrast the same, it is not stated when you compare the spec's. Samsung site will say they both have ultra-contrast. Now it can be that there are some differences between these 2 ( contrast and 2 bit panel-difference) But if it were to give a significant difference in PQ samsung would have promoted it that way. I also believe that once you reach a certain contrast, in a certain panel-size, increasing it doesn't do ****. It's a bit like the Megapixel race in camera's. Purely for bragging, but PQ-wise, nothing extra. Also; on paper, the B6000 and B7000 series have much higher "ultra-contrast" ( 3.000.000:1 I believe ) but many people find the B750/B650 to be on par with them, which kinda shows how once a certain level is achieved, all benefits of increasing it are very small to nothing.

Instead they did not quote the difference and launched the B750 as the B650 with 240hz. That's it's "selling point". I conclude that they do have almost identical PQ since not one review has stated 240 as a good step up from 120hz, same happend with the Z4500 sony's.

Agree. I have seen the B750, B7100, B6000, B650 displayed side-by-side (in the order mentioned) at Frys many times showing the same video. I find it hard to believe of claims that the PQ of any of these TVs is "a lot" better than the others.

We should be happy that there are so many good choices for different prices, styles, colors, screen sizes, spec numbers, defects etc., just from Samsung alone.
post #23 of 39
agreed, the top of the line samsungs are really both stunning to look at as to watch. It's my second samsung now and no problems here. I've looked at the competition, including sony, (Z4500 and W5500 ) and they don't have the wow factor new samsungs have.
post #24 of 39
The bottom line is Samsung fooled a lot of you people. Samsung marketed the Luxia's as being super thin, this is why they were able to sucker punch many of you into spending for a high end TV. They know edge lit is a glorified CCFL TV but the thinness allowed them to market the coolness factor. Most people don't mount TV's, thinness is something most people could care less about, most new LCD's are thin enough. Notice the ads? They show the side view and how thin the TV is, but you really don't see Samsung pushing the edge lit feature. Edge lit compared to local dimming is like finding out Jessica Alba wants to date you until learning it was a mistake and it was really Jessica Tandy. The luxia's are not high end TV's, but if you people want to spend high end bucks, well, it's your money.
post #25 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lipcrkr View Post

The bottom line is Samsung fooled a lot of you people. Samsung marketed the Luxia's as being super thin, this is why they were able to sucker punch many of you into spending for a high end TV. They know edge lit is a glorified CCFL TV but the thinness allowed them to market the coolness factor. Most people don't mount TV's, thinness is something most people could care less about, most new LCD's are thin enough. Notice the ads? They show the side view and how thin the TV is, but you really don't see Samsung pushing the edge lit feature. Edge lit compared to local dimming is like finding out Jessica Alba wants to date you until learning it was a mistake and it was really Jessica Tandy. The luxia's are not high end TV's, but if you people want to spend high end bucks, well, it's your money.

It seems to be that Samsung has stopped using the “luxia” branding. What I see is focus on the 9 series, 8 Series 6 Series Etc. That said Samsung is pushing the thin angle. Samsung even made a special wall mount for the 6-8000 models. This will be a benefit to anyone seeking to hang their TV between the wall and the refrigerator. But seriously some people DO want thin and that’s their choice.

Samsung is also pushing the Eco Friendly angle. In fact on the 8000 home page I see them push Picture Quality, Depth and Power Consumption. Arguably Samsung does have other models with marginally better picture quality in the 2009 line up. Maybe in the long run LED over CCFL will pay off?

Could lead to lower power bills, Maybe even longer life of the TV?
post #26 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lipcrkr View Post

Edge lit compared to local dimming is like finding out Jessica Alba wants to date you until learning it was a mistake and it was really Jessica Tandy.

Haha... funny, and so true.

Local dimming sets (Samsung A950, Sony XBR8) make these edge-lit sets look pale by comparison. The only thing edge-lit has over local dimming is a thinner cabinet... and I'm happy to sacrifice a couple inches of depth to get better picture, better performance and better screen uniformity.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by happy nightmares View Post

Haha... funny, and so true.

Local dimming sets (Samsung A950, Sony XBR8) make these edge-lit sets look pale by comparison. The only thing edge-lit has over local dimming is a thinner cabinet... and I'm happy to sacrifice a couple inches of depth to get better picture, better performance and better screen uniformity.

Keep an eye on the new Toshiba 670 series. LD, 240hz scanner, 55", resolution +, deep lagoon panel, and a few hundred cheaper than the B6000. Also, if anyone wants a Samsung LED i recommend the 950 series. It's gone way down in price.
post #28 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by lipcrkr View Post

Keep an eye on the new Toshiba 670 series. LD, 240hz scanner, 55", resolution +, deep lagoon panel, and a few hundred cheaper than the B6000. Also, if anyone wants a Samsung LED i recommend the 950 series. It's gone way down in price.

If the Tosh 670U local zone dimming doesnt have the inherent problems that the edge lit LED Sammys have then Toshiba will definitely be a winner IMO.

Alot of folks are waitng on the 670U to be released:

http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/tacpasse...v670u_spec.pdf
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickbeam View Post

Two quick points.

The CE dimming feature IS defeatable, you just have to access the service menu to do it. It is not possible to disable it in any of the standard menu settings. Average Joe will not notice it and the afficianado will find out how to disable it so where is the real harm in it?

One selling point that is a genuine benefit that seems to be glossed over in these discussions is a much lower power usage to operate these edge lit LEDs and their "green" manufacturing. For people who care about such things this is a strong selling point and one that may trump all but the most glaring differences in picture quality.

This is one of the exact reasons why i got this set. The power savings is big for me. I would love to see a power usage comparison.
post #30 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by st_o_p View Post

To make that kind of statement, you have either never seen Luxia in person - or have some kind of personal bias.

Sorry, wrong on both counts.
I have no axe to grind.
And I *have* seen them; They are gorgeous.
Very pleasing to the eye.
But not worth the price; pleasing does not mean accurate.
This is not a product for the golden eyeball crowd; its a product for spec-sheet buyers. :-)

The whole point of this thread is that the technology is simply a move side-ways, replacing one uniform-brightness (more or less) light source with another and that Samsung itself makes better products at lower prices.

I truly believe that in a year or two, sidelight LED will be the LCD backlight of choice for entry-level displays and seen nowhere else.
This technology is just *not* worth the premium price.
I would not be surprised to see it drop drastically in price because it is inherently cheaper than the alternatives; they're just milking the early adopter market for all its worth before letting the technology settle in its proper level.

You're entitled to disagree but don't assume I'm biased; I'm not the guy that kicked your dog this morning. (But I saw who did it.)
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