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The "Official" Pioneer VSX-1019AH Owner's Thread - Page 87

post #2581 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaltmann View Post

My main issues are:
- When watching some SAT TV on a HD channel and I use AutoSurround,ACL or Digital, I can barely hear voice or not at all but can hear the music soundtrack and other effects (people walking, door closing etc.). It works with Stereo.
- When watching other HD channels, I can get voice if I crank it but it there is a lot of bass and the commercials are too loud.
- Some commercials work, some don't on the same channel.
- Sometimes when I change channels and a commercial is on, I get no sound unless I toggle the input.

I've tuned off KURO Link.
Check that Dolby Digital is turned on in the Directv box
Set the speakers to Large with SB No as suggested by polk.

Sounds like an issue with the soundbar, what speaker outputs are you using? Does the soundbar have a center channel input? Does it have a separate subwoofer input?

I'd say the soundbar plus AVR combination is not ideal, the AVR is designed to drive a 5.1 or 7.1 separate speaker system.

As for DirecTV, read back a few pages, you need to connect it via optical as the audio over HDMI doesn't work right in combination with the 1019.
post #2582 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by orntar View Post

After running the MCACC setup the sound seems to quieter than before? I think watching a DVD was around -30, now I’m at about -20 for the equivalent volume, is that normal?

And lastly, I have to put the tuner at about -50 to listen comfortably, which means cranking the volume with each component change. Is there some way to lower the reference volume of the tuner?

Yes after running MCACC its normal to have reduced volume, this is because the system sets 0dB to reference level at 75dBs. Keep in mind the AVR goes to +12dB so you've still got room to play with the volume.

As for question #2 I don't think there is a way to adjust output levels on a per-source-basis other then using a different MCACC memory preset after adjusting the individual speaker trim settings to adjust things. Unfortunately the only way to automate this is with a marco and Harmony remote. I really wish you could assign a MCACC memory to each source and have it called up automatically.

After thought: On page 71 of the manual it mentions the A.ATT feature when dealing with analog sources that are "too strong" but I don't think the internal tuner is considered such a source. Doesn't hurt to try hitting that button to see if it fixes the problem.
post #2583 of 5121
Hi
Been fooling around with this receiver for the last few weeks. I like it for the most part but it DOES definitely have some quirks.

Like not being able to adjust the EQ when music is playing. Hello!

Also, is it just me or is this thing a little weak in the bass section? One of the biggest reasons I got a 5.1 capable receiver was to listen to SACDs. Am I overlooking something with respect to the extremely limited tonal and processor possibilities with respect to the "multi channel inputs"? It seems as though you can't even access the SACD gain feature from the analog multiple inputs. What is up with that? Am I misunderstanding how to assign stuff here or was the engineer smoking his lunch? It seems as though you cannot access any of the base audio features from the multi analog input source and that includes many of the features that are tailor specific to SACD to begin with. (LFE, SACD Gain, Loudness, etc)

What am I doing wrong?

I have messed with the manual EQ settings and there is just not enough there to get my speakers to move. For an amp that is supposed to be 90 watts RMS per channel, my old Onkyo 50 watt RMS stereo receiver actually produced more bass "flat" than this amp with it's graphic EQ set to maximize bass. Odd.

Now I admitt that I am being hard on it because it sounds awesome with respect to it's "pure direct" DTS and Dolby HDMI features, but as far as those multi analog inputs are concerned, it's SEVERELY lacking in warmth and punch.
post #2584 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMII View Post

It should work the way I described: DVR analog in -> DVR analog out -> gaming chair in. As described on page 28 of the manual this is how you record off the DVR source.

Does the gaming chair have a volume control? Unlike Zone 2 output the DVR audio jacks have a fixed volume so this might explain why you get no sound from them.

Yes, it does have a volume control. What does that mean then? Also, I tried connecting the DVR outs to an external Sirius docking station that has Aux and Line in and didn't get the Wii sound through that speaker either. The docking station has its own volume control as well. Are you saying any component with its own audio control would not work this way? I had also tried the CD-R outs and this didn't work either. This is the last remaining piece of my setup I wanted to get working...thanks for your patience.
post #2585 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by variableloudness View Post

Like not being able to adjust the EQ when music is playing. Hello! For an amp that is supposed to be 90 watts RMS per channel, my old Onkyo 50 watt RMS stereo receiver actually produced more bass "flat" than this amp with it's graphic EQ set to maximize bass.

Agree with you regarding the EQ settings... it's really stupid (in fact almost pointless) to silence the source when making the adjustments.

FYI this AVR has been bench tested only does around 30 watts RMS with around 120 watts peak. Thus it's not a really good fit for music, especially if your not using a powered subwoofer.
post #2586 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlp2955 View Post

Yes, it does have a volume control. What does that mean then?

Turn UP the volume control on the chair. The DVR outputs are fixed and only provide a pass-thru signal at low levels (like a pre-amp). Depending on the level differences you might need to chair's volume WAY up in order to get acceptable results. The Zone 2 outputs on the other hand are variable thus you can turn them up using the AVR's remote. This might explain why Zone 2 works but DVR out is not working for you.
post #2587 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by hernanu View Post

1. These DefTechs are probably a good match for the receiver - is your speaker budget $1500 - $2000 or the overall budget? If it's the speaker budget, you can definitely do better.

2. The Vsx21 is a better receiver. The improvements may not be something you find useful, but it is better. a - Better amplifier section, ~100 watts per channel over the human hearing range (20Hz to 23KHz) at 0.1% distortion (I believe), Three zones vs. 2, better A/D & D/A converters for analog input and out, 7.1 audio pre-outs if you want to buy a separate amplifier and bypass your AVR's amplifiers. All of these are valuable IF YOU USE THEM.

I find that the 1019 is just fine for power; I get about 110db at my listening position, which is plenty loud for me. I don't need a third zone, as I am happy with two, and the pre-outs would be useful for a home theater, of if I had 4 ohm speakers, neither of which I use. The one thing I would like is a more powerful amp section, but that is more for the techno-geek in me than for real life sound improvement within my listening range - I don't try to blast my speakers, although I do play them loud.

3. If your budget for speakers is 1500-2K, we could recommend one set of speakers. If you are more in the DefTech procinema 60's range, then you might want to look at the Energy Take Classics (~$170 for just the 5.0 speakers and add this sub for ~225. Total is about 400 for a very good setup.

OK to clarify $1500-$2000 overall budget. to break it down further $500-800 for AVR ,$600-1200 for speakers and some money in there for speaker wire and connectors.thanks for the info.
post #2588 of 5121
over the christmas break, i finally had time to sit down and really enjoy the receiver. I've found direct mode to sound best for me. wow, Terminator:Salvation really gave this thing a workout, the fan seemed to be on during most of the movie, might be time for me to get an additional cooling fan! I'm really enjoying the purchase and am completely satisfied with everything it's cranked out! Thanks again for this great thread that made my decision easier. No problems, just nice to see some positive feedback every once in a while!
post #2589 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by variableloudness View Post

Hi
Been fooling around with this receiver for the last few weeks. I like it for the most part but it DOES definitely have some quirks.

Like not being able to adjust the EQ when music is playing. Hello!

It's a deliberate design choice. Pioneer does not intend MCACC to be used as a basic graphic equalizer to alter the sound to taste; it intends it to correct for inaccuracies caused by the room and speaker to produce a flat, accurate sound. They do make it possible to tweak EQ, but they don't encourage it.

I understand that some people disagree with Pioneer on this, but it has been their consistent philosophy for years.

Quote:


Also, is it just me or is this thing a little weak in the bass section? One of the biggest reasons I got a 5.1 capable receiver was to listen to SACDs. Am I overlooking something with respect to the extremely limited tonal and processor possibilities with respect to the "multi channel inputs"? It seems as though you can't even access the SACD gain feature from the analog multiple inputs. What is up with that? Am I misunderstanding how to assign stuff here or was the engineer smoking his lunch? It seems as though you cannot access any of the base audio features from the multi analog input source and that includes many of the features that are tailor specific to SACD to begin with. (LFE, SACD Gain, Loudness, etc)

What am I doing wrong?...

The multichannel analog inputs are not affected by MCACC, bass management or any other processing features of the receiver. They are straight through, so what you hear is the original source as it is affected by the room, speakers, and possibly the SACD player, but not the receiver. This is not unique to Pioneer. Multichannel analog inputs work this way on most receivers. That's why SACD players usually have some rudimentary controls to balance analog output. If you have a player that supports it, you will probably get better results using HDMI as that permits you to take advantage of the receiver's processing.
post #2590 of 5121
About the power on via infrared (or lack thereof, specifically)...

I found this http://www.avforums.com/forums/av-am...e-problem.html

A couple of guys said that bypassed their surge protector, plugged it right into the wall, and they had no more remote problems. I don't have many outlets, has any one tried this? Or have another work around?
post #2591 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by JMII View Post

...this AVR has been bench tested only does around 30 watts RMS with around 120 watts peak. Thus it's not a really good fit for music, especially if your not using a powered subwoofer.

That test has been challenged, but even accepting the finding at face value, it's more than adequate for most users. The reviewer have the receiver high marks, and did not suggest it was underpowered. With typical modern speakers, 30 watts into 5 channels will produce in the neighborhood of 104dB in most rooms. Even in stereo, it will produce ~100dB, more than enough to cause hearing loss in sustained listening. 120 watts peak would add another 6dB headroom.

To bring this into perspective, standard reference SPL is 85dB average with 105 dB peaks. Most people find this uncomfortable and listen at about 65-75dB average, with peaks 20dB higher.

Most setups require about 1 watt to reach average reference level, and most listeners use <0.1 watts with normal material. This chart can help show how much power is required with your speakers in your room.
post #2592 of 5121
Hey Guys, picked up this receiver recently, just set it up today with a Samsung Blu player, Shaw HD pvr Cable box and Panasonic VIERA plasma. I have the blu ray player and PVR hooked through the BD in and HDMI In 1 respectively, with the HDMI out going to the TV. Here's the problem: The audio quality is perfect, no issues at all, but the image itself is all distorted. Everything's running at 1080p and it is all noticeably HD, but the colours are looking over saturated and wavy. I tested each device by connecting them directly to the tv through HDMI and that was not the issue. Only possible problem I could estimate is a faulty HDMI cable, but even that seems far off.

Any idea what's going on?

Thanks,

Tim
post #2593 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaltmann View Post

I recently replace my Harmon AVR (which worked great until everything digital died) with the 1019AH. I'm a bit of a newbie with the ins and outs of HDMI and this thing has so many settings, I'm not sure where to start. I have the following setup:

Directv HD connected HDMI OUT -> AVR 1019AH HDMI IN1
Samsung 1080P7 DVD connected HDMI OUT -> AVR 1019AH BD IN
AVR 1019AH HDMI OUT -> Panny HDTV TH-58PZ800U HDMI IN
polkaudio SurroundBar + Sub

My main issues are:
- When watching some SAT TV on a HD channel and I use AutoSurround,ACL or Digital, I can barely hear voice or not at all but can hear the music soundtrack and other effects (people walking, door closing etc.). It works with Stereo.
- When watching other HD channels, I can get voice if I crank it but it there is a lot of bass and the commercials are too loud.
- Some commercials work, some don't on the same channel.
- Sometimes when I change channels and a commercial is on, I get no sound unless I toggle the input.

I've tuned off KURO Link.
Check that Dolby Digital is turned on in the Directv box
Set the speakers to Large with SB No as suggested by polk.

Not sure what else to do as the manual isn't very clear. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

There are a few other members who also have the 1019 and a Polk soundbar - Ex: This member who had a few questions. Long and short of it, a sound bar is going to be more limited than a full surround setup, but it still should give you good sound.

A couple of issues with this soundbar:

1. It has full 5.1 connections, which should be connected as you would any 5.1 setup. (Fronts, surrounds, center and sub).

2. The manual gives you the option of connecting the sub via the AVR's sub pre-out connection. It also notes an alternative connection in parallel with the fronts. I would recommend using the AVR's pre-out and not the Polk parallel connection, so the 1019 can manage Bass for you.

3. The sweet spot for a sound bar is smaller than for a true surround system. That means that if you move to the right or left a certain amount of distance, the sound attenuates.

4. Set those speakers to small. They are not large enough to pull off the large setting, and you want the sub to support the soundbar properly. The drivers are 3.5 at most (not sure which sound bar you have) and the frequency range is not low enough to mark them as large.

5. Set the Xover to 100.


I would move that sub to the sub pre-out, re-run MCACC, and maybe PM the other members who own sound bars to see if they have advice, they have had it for a while.
post #2594 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by eddysnake View Post

over the christmas break, i finally had time to sit down and really enjoy the receiver. I've found direct mode to sound best for me. wow, Terminator:Salvation really gave this thing a workout, the fan seemed to be on during most of the movie, might be time for me to get an additional cooling fan! I'm really enjoying the purchase and am completely satisfied with everything it's cranked out! Thanks again for this great thread that made my decision easier. No problems, just nice to see some positive feedback every once in a while!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfan424 View Post

It's a deliberate design choice. Pioneer does not intend MCACC to be used as a basic graphic equalizer to alter the sound to taste; it intends it to correct for inaccuracies caused by the room and speaker to produce a flat, accurate sound. They do make it possible to tweak EQ, but they don't encourage it.

Welcome back Macfan and eddy. I have been following this thread since quite some time, and had noticed you two missing since a few days. Hope you had a Merry Christmas and a great beginning to 2010.

Poor JMII and hernanu have been quite lonely answering many questions from many people (me included)
post #2595 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfan424 View Post

It's a deliberate design choice. Pioneer does not intend MCACC to be used as a basic graphic equalizer to alter the sound to taste; it intends it to correct for inaccuracies caused by the room and speaker to produce a flat, accurate sound. They do make it possible to tweak EQ, but they don't encourage it.

I understand that some people disagree with Pioneer on this, but it has been their consistent philosophy for years.

The multichannel analog inputs are not affected by MCACC, bass management or any other processing features of the receiver. They are straight through, so what you hear is the original source as it is affected by the room, speakers, and possibly the SACD player, but not the receiver. This is not unique to Pioneer. Multichannel analog inputs work this way on most receivers. That's why SACD players usually have some rudimentary controls to balance analog output. If you have a player that supports it, you will probably get better results using HDMI as that permits you to take advantage of the receiver's processing.

I really do want to thank you for your information. Are you telling me that although the multi channel inputs allow you to switch between M1 through M6, that the sound is unaffected by the EQ settings???? Please forgive me for being crude, but that's about as retarded as retarded gets. NO SACD player on the globe was intended to be output direct. If that was the case they would not recommend using a receiver to begin with. This is just an incredibly inept design on Pioneer's part. I am keeping the receiver as I like it for dvd/bd, but next to no commercial SACD players have HDMI SACD output. They support the video of many SACD players like Harmon Kardon's DVD 48, but the HDMI on most players that will play SACD does not support SACD audio. I know that the Oppo player does, but it's the only player under a grand that does and it's a single player.

To produce this receiver minus multi channel analog input processing is just plain DUMB. That's because 99% of SACD users utilize their multi channel analog outputs. Duh! Especially when you have LFE & SACD gain in the friggin thing to begin with. Utterly stupid.
post #2596 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by variableloudness View Post

are you telling me that although the multi channel inputs allow you to switch between M1 through M6, that the sound is unaffected by the EQ settings???? Please forgive me for being crude, but that's about as retarded as retarded gets. NO SACD player on the globe was intended to be output direct. If that was the case they would not recommend using a receiver to begin with. This is just an incredibly inept design on Pioneer's part.

I may be wrong, but I don't think this is uncommon across the boards for receivers. I know I experienced this problem with my Sony avr as well.
post #2597 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by variableloudness View Post

I really do want to thank you for your information. Are you telling me that although the multi channel inputs allow you to switch between M1 through M6, that the sound is unaffected by the EQ settings???? Please forgive me for being crude, but that's about as retarded as retarded gets. NO SACD player on the globe was intended to be output direct. If that was the case they would not recommend using a receiver to begin with. This is just an incredibly inept design on Pioneer's part. I am keeping the receiver as I like it for dvd/bd, but next to no commercial SACD players have HDMI SACD output. They support the video of many SACD players like Harmon Kardon's DVD 48, but the HDMI on most players that will play SACD does not support SACD audio. I know that the Oppo player does, but it's the only player under a grand that does and it's a single player.

To produce this receiver minus multi channel analog input processing is just plain DUMB. That's because 99% of SACD users utilize their multi channel analog outputs. Duh! Especially when you have LFE & SACD gain in the friggin thing to begin with. Utterly stupid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eddysnake View Post

I may be wrong, but I don't think this is uncommon across the boards for receivers. I know I experienced this problem with my Sony avr as well.

As eddysnake observed, this is pretty much standard design practice. It is not unique to Pioneer. The only thing most AVR's do with multichannel analog input is amplify the signal; the only control that affects them is the volume control. My understanding is that to do otherwise would at minimum involve adding additional multichannel A/D circuitry, which in turn would add to the cost for all buyers, even though only a tiny fraction of them use the analog inputs. {And this in turn would probably invoke the wrath of some would be "purists" who do not want additional circuitry in their signal path, so a multichannel bypass would probably have to be included, adding still more to the cost. )

No one said SACD players were meant to be used without amplification. However, nearly all of them were designed with rudimentary bass management and channel balancing circuits that concede that those features are not available from the receivers most users are likely to have.

You are right that SACD over HDMI is rare, in part because SACD became moribund before HDMI became widely used as an audio source by receivers (early HDMI receivers were just switchers). My Yamaha DVD-C961 changer does have this feature, as do all my Oppos. After living with a Sony player that only had analog multichannel SACD outputs, I made HDMI compatibility a "must have" for all future SACD player purchases, precisely because I was aware of the analog shortcomings of the vast majority of AVRs.
post #2598 of 5121
just started experiencing an intermittent issue while using the receiver.. it seems that randomly the volume will just spike to very loud without touching anything.. then if i hit either the volume up or down it goes back to the volume level it was at.. anyone ever experience this? it's happened twice this past week..

Thanks,
Chris
post #2599 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by xris2o0o View Post

just started experiencing an intermittent issue while using the receiver.. it seems that randomly the volume will just spike to very loud without touching anything.. then if i hit either the volume up or down it goes back to the volume level it was at.. anyone ever experience this? it's happened twice this past week..

Thanks,
Chris

If it's during commercials, it is a common problem. If not, if it is just random, then there is an issue with the AVR. Make sure anything external that can affect it is shut down, like Kuro link. Also narrow it down by seeing if it's a problem with a specific component, like a cable box.
post #2600 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Macfan424 View Post

As eddysnake observed, this is pretty much standard design practice. It is not unique to Pioneer. The only thing most AVR's do with multichannel analog input is amplify the signal; the only control that affects them is the volume control. My understanding is that to do otherwise would at minimum involve adding additional multichannel A/D circuitry, which in turn would add to the cost for all buyers, even though only a tiny fraction of them use the analog inputs. {And this in turn would probably invoke the wrath of some would be "purists" who do not want additional circuitry in their signal path, so a multichannel bypass would probably have to be included, adding still more to the cost. )

No one said SACD players were meant to be used without amplification. However, nearly all of them were designed with rudimentary bass management and channel balancing circuits that concede that those features are not available from the receivers most users are likely to have.

You are right that SACD over HDMI is rare, in part because SACD became moribund before HDMI became widely used as an audio source by receivers (early HDMI receivers were just switchers). My Yamaha DVD-C961 changer does have this feature, as do all my Oppos. After living with a Sony player that only had analog multichannel SACD outputs, I made HDMI compatibility a "must have" for all future SACD player purchases, precisely because I was aware of the analog shortcomings of the vast majority of AVRs.

Well, thanks for putting up with me. Things like these can be frustrating.

What you state concerning the analog multi channel inputs and extra expense with respect to mass manufacturing makes sense logically.

Can I ask you a few straight forward questions? You really seem to know your audio/video.

Are you certain that the 1019AH-k will correctly receive and interpret SACD via HDMI from the 500.00 Oppo?

The humble SACD player I have is way down there on CD player/changer list I'm sure. It's a Sony SCD-CE595. The only reason I have an SACD player is it's the only 5 disc player that Best Buy had when my 15 year old Yamaha 5 disc changer took a dump. I can't fool around when it comes to music. I HAVE to have my daily fix.

I remember sincerely loving the two channel SACD mixes that came through just the front analog channel outputs when I had the SACD player hooked up to my old Onkyo receiver. If I hook up the optical output of the Sony SACD changer to the input on the 1019AH-k, will I get that same 2channel mix through the optical output or is that an altogether different "CD only" signal that the SACD won't even play through no matter how I have the player configured? I would imagine that I could at least listen to my regular CDs via the optical connection with the "stereo" facilitation (digital processing) of the 1019 receiver, correct?

Sadly, I know that the CD market is dead as a door nail hence all the 1019's MP3 facilitation. Truth is, I'll probably never even pop the plug on the front of the 1019 unless I get brave enough to use the pink noise advanced auto
set up features that require the unit's mic. I just LOVE music and I love film too.

I will say this though. For a DVD/BD oriented receiver, the 1019AH-k kicks some major butt. It sounds tremendous. I honestly don't get what everyone is stating about the unit getting "hot" however. Mine runs genuinely cool for the most part. Watched Inglorious Bastards the other day from start to finish, The Dark Knight, etc. Never really gets "hot" that I am aware of. At least not yet.

Thanks again for bearing with me.
post #2601 of 5121
I'm returning an Onkyo SR-607 due to amount of heat it's developing in an enclosed cabinet.

I'm going to purchase the Pioneer 1019 and want to be sure I can connect my Satellite DVR and Bluray player via HDMI to the AVR and then one HDMI from the AVR to the TV. Afterwards, be able to put the AVR in standy mode and still be able ot watch the audio/video on the TV using the TV spreakers.

Is this HDMI pass through achievable with the Pioneer 1019? The Onkyo does this and I like the option.

Thx
post #2602 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elnino75 View Post

OK to clarify $1500-$2000 overall budget. to break it down further $500-800 for AVR ,$600-1200 for speakers and some money in there for speaker wire and connectors.thanks for the info.

Okkkkk......

Here's my Energy solution, since I'm mostly an Energy guy. 2 RC-10's @ $300, for your fronts. 2 RC-mini's for surrounds @ $200 for both. One RC-mini center for $170, leaves ~500 for a good sub - Hsu VTF-2 MK3 does just fine for $520.

Don't spend a lot for wire and connectors - Monoprice or Blue Jean cables are great providers.
post #2603 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by harley13 View Post

Is this HDMI pass through achievable with the Pioneer 1019? The Onkyo does this and I like the option.

The 1019 only works like this with other Pioneer equipment, like their Kuro line of HDTVs. Don't let the manual fool you, it has a "thru" option for HDMI, but it only works when the AVR is actually turned ON.
post #2604 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by hernanu View Post

Okkkkk......

Here's my Energy solution, since I'm mostly an Energy guy. 2 RC-10's @ $300, for your fronts. 2 RC-mini's for surrounds @ $200 for both. One RC-mini center for $170, leaves ~500 for a good sub - Hsu VTF-2 MK3 does just fine for $520.

Don't spend a lot for wire and connectors - Monoprice or Blue Jean cables are great providers.

Thanks for the input.
now to find a place to hear these speakers. BB doesn't have them LOL I'd have to drive a ways but could get to a Crutchfield.
I'm definitely going with your suggestion on the wires and connectors..they unbelievably over priced at the big box stores.
16AWG should do well correct. at least i don't have to buy any tools to wire up my system as i already have everything i need tool wise from my previous job.
post #2605 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elnino75 View Post

Thanks for the input.
now to find a place to hear these speakers. BB doesn't have them LOL I'd have to drive a ways but could get to a Crutchfield.
I'm definitely going with your suggestion on the wires and connectors..they unbelievably over priced at the big box stores.
16AWG should do well correct. at least i don't have to buy any tools to wire up my system as i already have everything i need tool wise from my previous job.

The drawback on these speakers is that like most direct sale speakers, they will be difficult to hear at a regular store. Most direct sellers, like Vann's where I found most of these prices, have a liberal return policy.

Their approach (along with many others) is to allow you to audition the speakers, and if they don't perform the way you want, to return them with minimal fuss. It's how they can offer 50% off speakers that are such high quality like the RC-10's (normally $600 / pair). I have bought a lot online, so it was not a problem for me, but I can see some reticence to do this.

If you go to the speakers forum, though, you'll find that reputable vendors like Vanns and wwstereo (speakers, etc) as well as monoprice (cables) are held in high regard for both their service and prices. The final argument for doing things this way rather than by going to BB is that speakers depend a lot on the dynamics of the room that they are going to perform in. Auditioning speakers in your own home rather than some idealized environment set up at a showroom may actually be a much better metric for how happy they will make you.

I'd hit the speakers forum for advice from some very knowledgeable people.
post #2606 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by variableloudness View Post

...Are you certain that the 1019AH-k will correctly receive and interpret SACD via HDMI from the 500.00 Oppo?

Well, I have a VSX-01 and SC-07, and they work beautifully with an assortment of Oppos, including the BDP-83. As far as I can tell from the manual, the 1019 works the same way with SACDs, so I'd say yes. You'll want to use Oppo's DSD output to activate your receiver's SACD gain function.

BTW, Oppo has semi-announced a new lower priced BD player (details in a couple of weeks or so). Apparently it will be a BD version of the DV-980, in which case it won't have the high end ABT video processing, but it would handle SACDs exactly like the BDP-83 (at a much lower cost).

Quote:


The humble SACD player I have is way down there on CD player/changer list I'm sure. It's a Sony SCD-CE595. The only reason I have an SACD player is it's the only 5 disc player that Best Buy had when my 15 year old Yamaha 5 disc changer took a dump. I can't fool around when it comes to music. I HAVE to have my daily fix.

I remember sincerely loving the two channel SACD mixes that came through just the front analog channel outputs when I had the SACD player hooked up to my old Onkyo receiver. If I hook up the optical output of the Sony SACD changer to the input on the 1019AH-k, will I get that same 2channel mix through the optical output or is that an altogether different "CD only" signal that the SACD won't even play through no matter how I have the player configured? I would imagine that I could at least listen to my regular CDs via the optical connection with the "stereo" facilitation (digital processing) of the 1019 receiver, correct?

You can't get SACD through optical, but there is nothing to stop you from using the CE595's front two analog outputs to your 1019's analog CD input for the 2-channel layer of your SACDs. That would also enable all of the 1019's processing if you want it. It's just bypassed for multichannel analog inputs. That's how I use my CE595 with my VSX-01.

Actually, I use a pair of splitters so I can play multichannel SACD's as well, but I don't often use the analog multichannel inputs often anymore since I moved my Oppo DV-981 into that setup. I much prefer using it's HDMI output.

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Sadly, I know that the CD market is dead as a door nail hence all the 1019's MP3 facilitation. Truth is, I'll probably never even pop the plug on the front of the 1019 unless I get brave enough to use the pink noise advanced auto set up features that require the unit's mic..

I can't imagine anyone who goes to the trouble of getting into SACD's these days listening to MP3's. Maybe it's only me, but I find them all but unlistenable through a sound system which is high enough in quality to reveal their flaws. Receivers try to improve them, but it's like SD TV, there is only so much that can be done with a low quality original. GIGO applies to both.

However, you will want to run MCACC. You haven't tapped your 1019's potential until you do.
post #2607 of 5121
Quote:
Originally Posted by hernanu View Post

...speakers depend a lot on the dynamics of the room that they are going to perform in. Auditioning speakers in your own home rather than some idealized environment set up at a showroom may actually be a much better metric for how happy they will make you...

QFT. Dealer demos are often very misleading, as speakers can sound very different at home. There are too many variables that cannot be accounted for. Listening to them in the environment in which they will be used is by far the best way to evaluate speakers.
post #2608 of 5121
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Originally Posted by harley13 View Post

I'm returning an Onkyo SR-607 due to amount of heat it's developing in an enclosed cabinet.

I'm going to purchase the Pioneer 1019 and want to be sure I can connect my Satellite DVR and Bluray player via HDMI to the AVR and then one HDMI from the AVR to the TV. Afterwards, be able to put the AVR in standy mode and still be able ot watch the audio/video on the TV using the TV spreakers.

Is this HDMI pass through achievable with the Pioneer 1019? The Onkyo does this and I like the option.

Thx

I'm really surprised by the number of times this question about being able to listen to the TV speakers came up in this thread. I just don't understand why someone will completely ignore all the things they can do with this AVR to tune the sound. I'm guessing in most cases the issue is with the dialog not being legible at low levels. The following features can help improve that and probably make it better than any TV on the market:
- ALC;
- Dialog enhancement;
- Midnight mode;
- DRC modes;
- Switching to DD Movie mode for stereo signal;
- Increasing the level of the center channel;
- Increasing the 1kHz, 2kHz, and 4kHz bands in the EQ;

These settings are either per input or can be saved in a memory and one can have a special memory for the case in point.

Another reason for this question can be that the AVR does not sound right for that purpose out of the box and the user finds these tweaks overwhelming to deal with.
post #2609 of 5121
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Originally Posted by Macfan424 View Post

Well, I have a VSX-01 and SC-07, and they work beautifully with an assortment of Oppos, including the BDP-83. As far as I can tell from the manual, the 1019 works the same way with SACDs, so I'd say yes. You'll want to use Oppo's DSD output to activate your receiver's SACD gain function.

I have the 1019 hooked up to an Oppo BDP-83 through an HDMI cable. When I stick in a Super Audio CD the "SACD" message is displayed on the front of the Pioneer, with "DSD" lit up above it.
post #2610 of 5121
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Originally Posted by eddysnake View Post

over the christmas break, i finally had time to sit down and really enjoy the receiver. I've found direct mode to sound best for me. wow, Terminator:Salvation really gave this thing a workout, the fan seemed to be on during most of the movie, might be time for me to get an additional cooling fan! I'm really enjoying the purchase and am completely satisfied with everything it's cranked out! Thanks again for this great thread that made my decision easier. No problems, just nice to see some positive feedback every once in a while!

I think heat may be part of my problem. After about two hours of operation the unit starts making a louder buzzing noise, like a power transformer. I'm guessing that it is a cooling problem.

My fan doesn't seem to ever come on. Is there a way to manually switch it on or is it automatically turned on when the unit is hot?

I could stick a separate fan on top of it but that seems sloppy.

It may just be a loose wire but I don't want to void my warranty by opening the unit up. It would stink to have to send it back because of a fan.
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