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Extending roof antenna to multiple tvs

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Our OTA reception of the digital signals is poor when using rabbit ears so I need to carry the signal the roof antenna gets for one tv to three more tvs for a total of four tvs. Here's my job plan; anything incorrect or dangerous? Note: all steps will be done without going on the roof.

1) Cut the roof antenna coax under the roof over-hang outside. Likely the coax is RG59 and not grounded as it's been unchanged since 1974.
2) Mount a four port amp/splitter under the roof over-hang.
3) Mount a four port grounding block under the roof over-hang.
4) Attach the grounding block wire to the grounding pipe mount used by the ISP broad band installer.
5) Create all necessary RG6 solid copper core cables and compress a F connector on the cut end of the roof antenna RG59 coax.
6) Connect the antenna coax to a grounding block port and run another coax from there to the amp/splitter antenna IN port.
7) Connect the coax cables from three of the TVs to the grounding block and run three coax to the amp/splitter OUT ports. All four ports on the grounding block have now been used.
8) Connect the last coax cable for the fourth TV directly to the amp/splitter and bypassing the grounding block. Connect the other end of the last coax cable to a power inserter in the fourth TV room. I'm doing this as this coax will provide power to the amp/splitter.
9) Connect the power inserter to the wall transformer and fourth television.

Thanks
post #2 of 7
I would think you would only have to ground the cable from the antenna, since they are all tied together, but grounding the other cables as well won't hurt.

What type of splitter/amp are you using? You need a low noise unit if you are in a weak signal area. It should be specified for OTA use.

Otherwise the steps seem correct.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
I was planning on the PCT-MA2-4P Drop Amplifer, 4 Way Pass Return with Power Inserter. The 8 and 4 port versions have good reviews on amazon. In regards to grounding all the coax, I thought it was required that all outdoor exposed coax needs to be grounded before coming into the house. Or are you saying that all of the coax would be grounded automatically at the amp if I ground the antenna? If I rely on just grounding the antenna before entering the amp, the amp could still be destroyed if lightening strikes one of the other coax cables?
post #4 of 7
The PCT-MA2-4P Drop Amplifer has a noise figure of 3.6dB which is a little higher than the <3dB typical of low noise designs especially designed for antenna amplification. But it should work okay if you have a reasonable good signal from your antenna.

All the cable grounds are connected through the outer shield, connector shell, and amp case so it isn't absolutely necessary to connect all cables to ground, but it could provide a little extra protection.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbestor View Post

3) Mount a four port grounding block under the roof over-hang.
4) Attach the grounding block wire to the grounding pipe mount used by the ISP broad band installer.

NEC 810.21 has requirements for grounding conductors. Is the pipe mount attached to a water pipe within 5ft of its point of entrance to the building ?

Also, NEC 810.15 requires grounding of the antenna mast.
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Ok so coax does not have to be grounded nearest where it enters the building but where the object it's grounded to enters the building. The ISP installer, TWC/RR, has their line grounded at a pipe coming out from behind an electrical meter and circuit breaker box. Is this alright? If not, there is a water pipe which our backyard hose is connected to just three feet over.

I'm now planning on going with an Electroline amp which happens to have a grounding point so the amp can be grounded. Will grounding the amp be sufficient for the antenna and coax cables connected to it?
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbestor View Post

Ok so coax does not have to be grounded nearest where it enters the building but where the object it's grounded to enters the building. The ISP installer, TWC/RR, has their line grounded at a pipe coming out from behind an electrical meter and circuit breaker box. Is this alright? If not, there is a water pipe which our backyard hose is connected to just three feet over.

I'm now planning on going with an Electroline amp which happens to have a grounding point so the amp can be grounded. Will grounding the amp be sufficient for the antenna and coax cables connected to it?

No, the amp is not sufficient for grounding the antenna mast and coax. It sounds like the TWC ground will work if the pipe you're referring to is an electrical conduit connecting the meter to the main breaker panel.

The coax grounding block must be near where the coax enters the building. Your local library may have a copy of the NEC. I would refer to it to make sure. I wouldn't use the water pipe.
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