or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Technical › Coupon Eligible Converter Box (CECB) › FCC says "Double Re-Scan" may add available received stations to CECBs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

FCC says "Double Re-Scan" may add available received stations to CECBs

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
FCC Pushing 'Double Re-scan'

Involves having consumers clear out their boxes' memories before re-scanning

(Scan first with antenna disconnected to clear memory, connect antenna scan again)

Quote:


By John Eggerton -- Broadcasting & Cable, 6/15/2009 1:09:28 PM MT
The FCC says some stations in Chicago and Philadelphia may have to apply for power boosts and are in discussions with stations there about their various technical issues, but that it is currently focused on consumer-based fixes for reception problems, including promoting what it is calling the double-rescan.

That is having consumers clear out their boxes' memories before re-scanning, a process the commission says is having success, particularly in Chicago. Our teams are beginning to put the word out on the technique, says FCC spokesman Rick Kaplan.

Kaplan says that some consumers who were having problems with both channel 2 and channel 7 in Chicago, for example, were having problems with their boxes because both those stations went from a high UHF to a low VHF channel. "There are some converter boxes that, if you just do a normal re-scan, they won't be able to replace the old digital channel with the new one. So, you actually just have to clear the box out."

He says that the double re-scan has worked "very well" in Chicago with channel 2. The FCC has a person from the D.C. office now in the market who says the call center has been able to resolve "about 90% of the calls that way, says Kaplan. He said L.A. has had success with the double re-scan as well, where according to field staffers there. 80%-90% of calls about KTLA reception have been resolved.

To double re-scan, says Kaplan, viewers need to unplug the antenna, then scan so it picks up nothing, then unplug the converter or DTV set, plug it back in, then rescan.

But for viewers still having trouble, says Kaplan, the FCC is talking with stations about possible long-term solutions from their end. If stations have to officially ask for more power, the FCC will take that seriously, he said. But that will also include figuring out who the boosted power might interfere with, and what dominoes that might trigger elsewhere.

"We want to figure out how to get it right," he says. "We don't want to rush, but don't want to delay, either." But while the commission is working with stations on their end, a process that won't be immediate if it involves adjusting power levels, the FCC "wants to make sure all consumer avenues are exhausted."

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/art...e_Re_scan_.php

I just advised someone to do this and it gained a low power station for them.
post #2 of 8
From the FCC

WASHINGTON, D.C – Consumers having difficulty receiving certain television
channels following the June 12 transition to digital TV should try these two tips for better
reception: “double rescanning”, and double-checking and relocating their antennas. Meanwhile,
local broadcasters are working to resolve those issues that originate with their signal.

Double Rescanning
Many consumers already know about the need to run the “scan” function on their digital
converter boxes or digital TV sets periodically following the June 12 digital TV transition.
Scanning searches for and “remembers” the available digital broadcast channels.
But in some cases where stations moved their digital frequencies on June 12, simple
scanning may not be enough. There is a procedure – sometimes called “double re-scanning” –
that can clear your box’s memory of saved channels. These earlier scans may have saved channel
information that is now incorrect.
There are five simple steps to a double re-scan for a converter box or digital TV, which
are as follows:
1. Disconnect the antenna from the box or digital TV
2. Re-scan the box or digital TV without the antenna connected. As with any scan
follow the on-screen instructions or owner’s manual for your device
3. Unplug the box or digital TV from the electrical outlet for at least one minute
4. Reconnect the antenna to the box or digital TV and plug the unit into the electrical
outlet.
5. Rescan the box or digital TV one more time.

Double Check & Relocate Your Antenna
You must have a “VHF/UHF antenna. “Rabbit ears,” rods, or other elements are needed
to pick up channels 2-13 (VHF), and a circle, bow-tie, or other element is needed to pick up
channels 14-51 (UHF). Some antennas marketed as HDTV antennas don’t perform well on VHF
channels; some antennas are VHF or UHF-only.
For the best reception of channels 2-6, extend the rods all the way out. For the best
reception of channels 7-13, reduce the length of the rods to 12-18 inches.

Location, Location, Location
The location of an indoor antenna is key. And one of the most popular spots for indoor
antennas – on top of the TV – may not be the best. Consumers having trouble with digital TV
reception should try moving their antennas to one of these locations:
• Near a window
• As high as possible
• Away from other electronic equipment, including computers, VCRs, DVD
players, converter boxes, and the television itself
• Change the direction the antenna is facing
• Rooftop antennas may be needed in some instances
Consumers may need to run the “scan” function again on their converter boxes after
moving the antenna
post #3 of 8
Why don't they also advise consumers to scan for channels at Midnight. I'm sure they would gain one or two more, then loose them during the morning, day, and evening periods.
post #4 of 8
The drawback for me is that some channels come in only occasionally, depending on the weather or whatever else; when such a channel is receivable, I rush around to every tuner in the house trying to get it added to the translation table.

A double rescan would undo all that and put me back at square one.  I'm getting WLS-DT just fine without it.
post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

The drawback for me is that some channels come in only occasionally, depending on the weather or whatever else; when such a channel is receivable, I rush around to every tuner in the house trying to get it added to the translation table.

A double rescan would undo all that and put me back at square one.* I'm getting WLS-DT just fine without it.

some CECB will let you add channels without scanning. if you know the real channel number then in a 'manual tuning' or 'edit channel' function in the setup menu you can add without any signal present.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post

some CECB will let you add channels without scanning. if you know the real channel number then in a 'manual tuning' or 'edit channel' function in the setup menu you can add without any signal present.

Yes, and some will let you delete a currently known channel.  If the tuner has those functions, the effect of double rescanning can be achieved on the channels where it's needed without wrecking the rest of the table.

However, I find such functions only in my CECBs and not in my television sets.  The TVs not only don't have a way to delete a channel from the scan table, but if the most recent scan reached the given channel number and found no ATSC signal there, some of them won't allow adding the station.  And let's not even open up the can of worms where the unmapped station's physical channel matches the virtual channel of a station already mapped.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post

some CECB will let you add channels without scanning. if you know the real channel number then in a 'manual tuning' or 'edit channel' function in the setup menu you can add without any signal present.

That's what caused the problems. I initially tried the "new channels" on my CECBs, to see what would happen when channels changed frequencies. The CECBs failed. They left the old, dead channels on the list. When I did a full channel scan, the problem was solved, but that wiped out the "reception only at night" channels. So now I am going to have to spend the time to reacquire those marginal channels.

I amazed the FCC, NTIA, NAB, etc. all failed to think of this eventuality when they wrote up the CECB standards.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpost View Post

some CECB will let you add channels without scanning. if you know the real channel number then in a 'manual tuning' or 'edit channel' function in the setup menu you can add without any signal present.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JNinCA View Post

That's what caused the problems. I initially tried the "new channels" on my CECBs, to see what would happen when channels changed frequencies. The CECBs failed. They left the old, dead channels on the list. When I did a full channel scan, the problem was solved, but that wiped out the "reception only at night" channels. So now I am going to have to spend the time to reacquire those marginal channels.

I amazed the FCC, NTIA, NAB, etc. all failed to think of this eventuality when they wrote up the CECB standards.


on some CECB when you do a 'add channel' scan it finds new real channel and links to a virtual channel, the virtual channel may be duplicated. you need to do 'edit channel' to delete the now obsolete real channel.

it isn't a failure of the CECB. the box can do total new scan. on those boxes that allow adding channel you can do an 'add channel scan' though it needs some interaction for you to tidy things up. it gives you a choice to let the box do the thinking totally or for you to interact with it. it gives you some control over the result, not a failure it is a feature.

you can add those hard to get stations with that manual tuning method.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Technical › Coupon Eligible Converter Box (CECB) › FCC says "Double Re-Scan" may add available received stations to CECBs