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Walls built but question on sound proofing around objects(pipes) and doors.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
So my walls have 5/8" fire-rated on one side(furnace room) and two 1/2" with green glue on the other side(theatre room) so there is no sound coming from the walls but the issue I have is the spaces that are still open and what to do with them. Without moving the pipes(no room in the budget) what's the best way to block sound from this area? Do they have some expanding foam I can use up here to fill the void? What about above this wall where the ceiling joist going perpendicular. Should I just cut drywall to the shape of each section and do them just like the walls?

The idea is to block the noise from the boiler and washer in dryer which will be in this side room from the main theatre room.
LL
LL
post #2 of 15
What are you doing for a ceiling ?
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by budk View Post

What are you doing for a ceiling ?

There is an existing drop ceiling....that I'm not allowed to remove*.

* or so she says.
post #4 of 15
Quick way to fix that...change it. The wrath only lasts for a season...I'd rather deal with that. She's not going to rip it down once you've got some drywall up.

I couldn't live with drop ceiling - defeats the entire purpose of what you are trying to do here.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdholmes View Post

Quick way to fix that...change it. The wrath only lasts for a season...I'd rather deal with that. She's not going to rip it down once you've got some drywall up.

I couldn't live with drop ceiling - defeats the entire purpose of what you are trying to do here.

That was going to be my next post, should I drywall the ceiling? Will pipes above like in the picture cause problems later if I drywall? Everyone I brought in to help with the construction has said I should keep the drop ceiling even though I feel to complete the look and feel I need to do drywall.
post #6 of 15
It looks like you could build a little soffit around them no problem.

I would for sure do the drywall. Is everything pretty new up there? Make sure it's all in good shape before covering it up. If something goes wrong later it isn't hard to cut the drywall in that area out, fix your problem and patch it over. But really, this shouldn't be a problem. We drywall over pipes on walls all the time, why should the ceiling be any different?
post #7 of 15
Soffit for pipes is a good idea. Drywall on ceiling also. Otherwise there's no sound isolation, and existing wall would have been built in vain.

You have pipes, wires, vents etc running through the rest of your house. No dropped ceilings there...
post #8 of 15
It is easier to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission.*







*and offerings of flowers, chocolate, shoes, purses will help prevent bodily injury..
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Come to think of it, I think all my of "friends" said to keep the drop ceiling because they knew they would be the drywall lift if I decided to go that route! ;-) The women doesn't want me to do it because she already thinks I've bitten off more than I can chew and sees the project(and budget) growing daily.
post #10 of 15
The point we are all making is that if you keep the drop ceiling then there is really little to be gained by building a soffit around the areas in question.

I had similar concerns and I realized that I could always cut a hole in the drywall and patch it if I have a problem down the road.
post #11 of 15
Tell it to her this way:

All the money that was invested in 5/8ths on the furnace side, double drywall and green glue on the theatre side (which was a significant investment) is wasted if you use a dropped ceiling.

It's not so much that you are adding to the budget but that you are making sure what has already been spent is not totally wasted.

If you keep the dropped ceiling you may as well take a sledgehammer to the rest of the walls...

She still may not like it, but as you can see from the resounding response it's fact.

Besides - drywall is cheap. It's also easy to do - I never did it before my family room project and I had no problem. If you run into any problems, as you know, there is lots of help on here.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Do I have to have double layers on the ceiling too or just a single 5/8" layer will work? Insulation or no?
post #13 of 15
Whatever your budget can fit - the more you can do the better, of course.

I will likely end up doing clips on my ceiling with insulation and one layer...

NOTE - I actually will be doing the double layer - I was trying to remember what Ted had advised in my email.
post #14 of 15
Please forgive me for saying this, but taking the time and money to install clips but leaving out the second layer of drywall is like sprinting to within 1' of the finish line.

The clips create a spring. We want the resonance to be as low as possible. So we want that spring we created to oscillate as slowly as possible. Mass (drywall) accomplishes this.

Drywall is so cheap and would do so much. Please don't omit it. You will likely regret it.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
What are clips?

Also, if I have recessed cans what's the best way to lower these enough to accommodate the extra drywall? Hanging one sheet is a pain, cutting two and hanging two over the entire ceiling...is a huge pain.


I'm also worried because the wood stove is in this room too and if I trap all the heat in with double layer drywall and insulation it will not only prevent the heat from going up to the second floor but it will make the media room hot as hell.
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