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Why convert m2ts to mkv? - Page 3

post #61 of 69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mummyscurse View Post

...I am having one huge problem, however. None of the commercial, "one click" reencoding programs seem to offer a feature that enables you to select the audio track among those several which may be offered in the .m2ts video file. The reencoding programs default the selection to the first of the audio tracks, which may or may not be the English track, or may be the track which has Director's comments, if available. Does anyone here know of an .m2ts capable reencoding program, which can reencode to .mkv, and which ALLOWS SELECTION OF THE AUDIO TRACK WANTED?

I, too am looking for a "one click" solution to converting M2TS to MKV. I found the following which does claim to allow you to select the audio file. Does anyone here have experience with this program?: http://www.icoolsoft.com/m2ts-converter/

Thanks!


Quote:
Originally Posted by msgohan View Post

Perhaps you should look up the definition of (re)mux/multiplex before you decide that someone's helpful suggestion is not what you're looking for...

I meant no offense. I've read this entire thread. txmuxer has been brought up several times. It obviously takes some know-how and several steps. I quoted Mummyscurse who was looking for a one-click solution. I was searching for such a solution as well. Hence the reason I used the term "converter".

I do appreciate your constructive input, though.
post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by taz291819 View Post

It's got to be the older laptop. I've made maybe 100 or so MKVs using this method, and never had audio sync issues.

bro, i stil cant figure out how to use eac3to... i've downloaded it but can u pls guide me step by step... i duno where to key in the command line..
btw, my m2ts is 1080i bd60
post #63 of 69
I thought this process was really easy; granted I was not doing anything fancy. Also, assumes that you have the Haali muxer installed.

I used eac3to like this:
eac3to.exe c:\\images\\movie c:\ emp\\movie.mkv

(c:\\images\\movie is the path the a blu-ray disc that I ripped)

The above created c:\ emp\\movie.mkv as well as some additional files with the audio, subtitles. The audio file had the extension .dts

The next thing I did was to run MKVMerge like this:
mkvmerge.exe -o finalmovie.mkv c:\ emp\\movie.mkv c:\ emp\\movieaudio.dts

The result was a MKV file called finalmovie.mkv which was had the audio stuck back into the container.

Smalldog
post #64 of 69
So, I have been trying to use tsMuxer to demux my m2ts files, and then using mkvmerge to create the mkv file. However, this is really not decreasing the size of the files, as the h264 video files are still rather large, and comparable to the 20+GB m2ts files I have. Am I missing something? I got the WD Livewire Powerline in hope of streaming my videos, but it wasn't working with my m2ts files, so I was hoping making them into mkv's might help. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks.
post #65 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by enron29 View Post

So, I have been trying to use tsMuxer to demux my m2ts files, and then using mkvmerge to create the mkv file. However, this is really not decreasing the size of the files, as the h264 video files are still rather large, and comparable to the 20+GB m2ts files I have. Am I missing something? I got the WD Livewire Powerline in hope of streaming my videos, but it wasn't working with my m2ts files, so I was hoping making them into mkv's might help. Let me know your thoughts. Thanks.

Neither tsmuxer or mkvmerge do any additional compression, so result files of the same size is expected. You'd have to use something like Handbrake to compress them further.

-Bill
post #66 of 69
New mkvmerge supports m2ts directly, so you don't need to demux them anymore. mkv uses less tech info - saves ~5% of disk space. One file, compact container, signed tracks, chapters etc. But don't try to put VC-1 interlaced into mkv.
post #67 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by CRT Dude View Post

Mkv has less overhead than m2ts so a 1:1 copy would be a little smaller.

I am testing converting my Blu-ray folder rips to mkv's to save space by getting rid of audio I don't need.

I was curious when I did a test and found a 37,137,524,736 byte m2ts file converted to a 34,373,169,725 byte MKV.

For the test I used all audio tracks. is MKV really 7% more effecient at packing the same data or did I do something wrong. I am testing with dvdfab blu-ray ripper with mkv.remux profile.
post #68 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by GGavin View Post

I am testing converting my Blu-ray folder rips to mkv's to save space by getting rid of audio I don't need.

I was curious when I did a test and found a 37,137,524,736 byte m2ts file converted to a 34,373,169,725 byte MKV.

For the test I used all audio tracks. is MKV really 7% more effecient at packing the same data or did I do something wrong. I am testing with dvdfab blu-ray ripper with mkv.remux profile.

Yes. It needs a LOT less headroom. Everything went fine.
post #69 of 69
Thanks.
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